Here's Why Tesla Motors Will Fall on Thursday

U.S. stocks rebounded on Wednesday, with the benchmark S&P 500 gaining 0.6%. Meanwhile, the narrower Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJINDICES: ^DJI  ) rose 0.7%, while the technology-heavy Nasdaq Composite Index (NASDAQINDEX: ^IXIC  ) fell 0.3%. Two high-profile growth stocks that weighed on the Nasdaq today: Tesla Motors (NASDAQ: TSLA  ) , which was down 3% in the run-up to this afternoon's release of its first-quarter results (see below) and Twitter (NYSE: TWTR  ) , which added a 4% decline to yesterday's 18% loss.

With regard to Twitter, the fact that there was no bounce today following such a sharp loss suggests that fundamental investors don't see value in the stock at current levels and will not step in to replace momentum traders, who have soured on the shares. As far as I'm concerned, their valuation doesn't look attractive; I think further price declines -- significant ones -- are likely. (Here's a more detailed version of my argument that Twitter's correction isn't over.)

Judging by the after-hours action in Tesla Motors' stock, investors aren't impressed with some aspect of today's first-quarter results announcement. On paper, it doesn't look like the reaction was related to what the company achieved in the first quarter:

  • The company beat Wall Street expectations on earnings per share, with $0.12 (adjusted) against a consensus estimate of $0.12, per the Thomson Reuters Financial Network. Revenues also came in ahead of expectations, at $713 million (adjusted) versus $699 million.
  • Drilling down to the sales floor, so to speak, deliveries of 6,457 Model S vehicles were squarely in the middle of the 6,200 to 6,600 range of analysts' estimates and slightly above Tesla's own forecast of 6,400. No complaints there, presumably.
  • Cash flow from operations was positive, at $61 million -- although free cash flow was negative $81 million, because of $141 million in capital expenditures.

In terms of outlook, CEO Elon Musk confidently states in the quarterly investor letter that Tesla is "pressing forward on a variety of initiatives to continue our growth in 2014 and beyond." Normally, I would heavily discount that sort of statement from a chief executive as, well, executive-speak, but Musk is not your garden-variety CEO. The number of fronts on which Tesla Motors is "pressing forward" is dizzying, including its retail expansion in Europe and China, the expansion of its store and Supercharger network in the U.S., the development of the Model X (due next year), and the construction of its battery "Gigafactory."

In all, the company reaffirmed its goal for non-GAAP automotive gross margin of 28% by the fourth quarter and its projection of capital expenditures in a range of $650 million to $850 million. (Note: "Non-GAAP" indicates that the gross margin metric Tesla Motors is tracking does not conform to generally accepted accounting procedures.)

Here's the rub
All of which leads to a pressing question: If both first-quarter results and the full year both look positive, why is the stock down nearly 8% in after-hours trading? I think it comes down to two factors that Tesla Motors shares with Twitter: A shift in sentiment toward high-profile growth names combined with an overvalued stock.

In that regard, I found one comment from a stock analyst that I think is particularly revealing: "[First quarter deliveries] beat, but not by as much as people expected them to beat. Overall these look like good results at a first glance." That's what Andrea James, an equity analyst with Dougherty & Co., told Bloomberg. (James rates Tesla a buy.) If a company beats, but expectations were for a higher "beat," did it really beat in the first place? In other words, the stock price before the earnings announcement was based on expectations that are higher than the published consensus forecasts.

As names such as Twitter and Tesla have been pummeled recently, investors have become more skeptical and are setting the bar higher if they are to support their high-flying valuations. Tesla Motors is an extraordinary company with a truly visionary CEO; however, that doesn't justify any price for the stock. At their current level, the shares continue to look overvalued to me, which suggests that tomorrow's (likely) drubbing won't be the last.

Beyond Tesla: Are you ready to profit from this $14.4 trillion revolution?
Every investor wants to get in on revolutionary ideas before they hit it big -- like buying PC maker Dell in the late 1980s, before the consumer computing boom, or purchasing stock in e-commerce pioneer Amazon.com in the late 1990s, when it was nothing more than an upstart online bookstore. The problem is, most investors don't understand the key to investing in hypergrowth markets. The real trick is to find a small-cap "pure play" and then watch as it grows in explosive fashion within its industry. Our expert team of equity analysts has identified one stock that's poised to produce rocket-ship returns with the next $14.4 trillion industry. Click here to get the full story in this eye-opening report.


Read/Post Comments (4) | Recommend This Article (5)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On May 07, 2014, at 9:31 PM, pipper0 wrote:

    I HAVE SEEN ALL THE NUMBERS AND READ ALL THE PROJECTIONS FOR THIS YEAR AND THE FUTURE. THINGS LOOKED BETTER IN THIS QUARTER, BUT STILL THE STOCK IS HAMMERED. THE SIMPLE FACT IS ELTON IS TOO MUCH FOR THE ANALISTS MUCH THE THE SAME AS THE PATRIOTS AND RED SOX. THEY CAN;T STAND SUCCESS.

    ADIOS

  • Report this Comment On May 08, 2014, at 2:51 AM, harkvasa wrote:

    TSLA is estimated to earn $4 per share for 2015 year. It is expected to grow around 35% per year over the next 5 years. So, I would put a value of 35 times 4 or approx. $140 per share in Dec 2015. That would put current discounted value at around $110 per share. So, I will wait till it gets to that level, before, I buy TSLA for my portfolio.

    At current price of $185 per share, it is too risky to hold for long term.

  • Report this Comment On May 08, 2014, at 7:54 AM, Pietrocco wrote:

    Alex,

    FINALLY a balanced un-hyped analysis of Tesla from TMF.

    Cudos to you!

    P.S. What is your valuation of the company? And can you show how you reach that level?

  • Report this Comment On May 09, 2014, at 8:49 AM, TMFAleph1 wrote:

    Hi Petrocco,

    Thanks for your comment. Here is a first-rate discussion of Tesla Motors' valuation from NYU's own valuation guru, Aswath Damodaran:

    http://aswathdamodaran.blogspot.com/2014/03/return-to-firing...

Add your comment.

Sponsored Links

Leaked: Apple's Next Smart Device
(Warning, it may shock you)
The secret is out... experts are predicting 458 million of these types of devices will be sold per year. 1 hyper-growth company stands to rake in maximum profit - and it's NOT Apple. Show me Apple's new smart gizmo!

DocumentId: 2948646, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 9/16/2014 7:28:41 AM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...


Advertisement