Boeing (NYSE:BA) released its latest report on airplane orders received -- and canceled -- through mid-May 2014 on Thursday. There were no new orders or cancellations noted since last week.

To date this year, the aerospace giant has booked:

  • 339 "gross" orders for various flavors of its 737 regional airliner
  • four orders for the 777 airliner
  • one 747 order
  • one 787 order

No new orders have been booked since Boeing last updated its order book a week ago. Nor have there been any new cancellations reported in the past seven days.

Since our look at Boeing's progress at the end of April, however, there have been some changes. Specifically, the company has added three new 737 orders from Turkmenistan Airlines, and one or more unidentified customer(s) appears to have switched out orders for seven 737 Next Generation aircraft, substituting requests for seven more modern (and more expensive, at least at list price) 737 MAX models instead.

Boeing's order book is not entirely clear on such order substitutions, and actually reflects only seven 737 orders canceled, with seven more orders placed. But as Boeing has explained, "if there are an equal number of orders and cancellations, it is almost always an NG to MAX conversion."

Net result: Boeing still has 345 gross plane orders booked to date. Subtracting 54 cancellations from that total, it's left with a net gain of 291 new plane orders so far this year -- which is still twice as many net orders as Airbus has booked.

Boeing announced Tuesday that it had lined up a deal to sell 50 737 aircraft, including Next-Generation 737s and 737 MAXs, to a subsidiary of China's Juneyao Airlines. The company said the orders would be posted to the orders and deliveries page "once all contingencies are cleared."

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