In case you haven't noticed, tech powerhouses Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) and Google (NASDAQ:GOOG) (NASDAQ:GOOGL) don't exactly get along these days.

While Apple is widely credited with creating the mainstream smartphone market, Google wasn't far behind, having launched Android a year later. Android's perceived "copying" of some of Apple's software elements led, among other things, to Apple CEO Steve Jobs threatening to go "thermonuclear" on Google.

However, more broadly, the launch of Android set off an arms race between Apple and Google that would eventually lead to Android growing into the go-to software option for smartphones and tablets the world over. Things really haven't been the same between the two ever since.

Google steals Apple's crown again
For the past several years, the power of Apple's brand has outshone that of Google. It has consistently ranked as the world's most valuable brand among most major surveys of brand strength, until now. And as you might have already guessed, the title has been stolen by archnemesis Google, according to one source.

In the video below, tech and telecom specialist Andrew Tonner discusses the recent survey and what it means for investors in both Apple and Google.

Apple may best Google with its next smart device
Apple recently recruited a secret-development Dream Team to guarantee its newest smart device was kept hidden from the public for as long as possible. But the secret is out... and some early viewers are even claiming its everyday impact could trump the iPod, iPhone, AND the iPad. In fact, ABI Research predicts 485 million of these type of devices will be sold per year. But one small company makes this gadget possible. And its stock price has nearly unlimited room to run for early in-the-know investors. To be one of them, and see Apple's newest smart gizmo, just click here!

Andrew Tonner owns shares of Apple. The Motley Fool recommends and owns shares of Apple and Google (A and C shares). Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.