With $40 Trillion on the Line in the Energy Market, Here's Where You Should Invest

Despite a slowdown in energy consumption in the developed parts of the world, it's still going to take massive investments to meet our energy needs.

Jun 7, 2014 at 5:51PM

For us to meet the worlds need for energy over the next several decades, were going to need to invest mountains of money. According to the IEA, it will take more than $40 trillion to satisfy our energy demands between now and 2035, and the majority of that is going to be spent on developing the massive oil and gas fields that still exist in both Russia and the OPEC nations. Many of these parts of the world have already gotten started. Core Laboratories (NYSE:CLB) recently announced that it had performed over 1,000 core samples in the Middle East last quarter alone, and the major services companies like Halliburton (NYSE:HAL) and Schlumberger (NYSE:SLB) are seeing huge upticks in revenue. 

This cold be just the tip of the iceberg, though. Find out who are the companies that are going to see the biggest benefit from this impending tidal wave of investment by tuning into the video below.

The 1 company that could actually tear the oil market away from Russia and OPEC
Oil production from places all over the world is changing the dynamics of the oil market. Much of that movement has been thanks to major strides in oil and gas drilling technology, and one behind-the-scenes energy giant is at the epicenter of this movement. Warren Buffett is so confident in this company's can't-live-without-it business model, he just loaded up on 8.8 million shares. An exclusive, brand-new Motley Fool report reveals the company we're calling OPEC's Worst Nightmare. Just click here to uncover the name of this industry-leading stock.

Joel South owns shares of Core Laboratories and Schlumberger. Tyler Crowe owns shares of Core Laboratories. You can follow them on Twitter @TMFEnergy and @TylerCroweFool, respectively.

The Motley Fool recommends Core Laboratories and Halliburton. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

A Financial Plan on an Index Card

Keeping it simple.

Aug 7, 2015 at 11:26AM

Two years ago, University of Chicago professor Harold Pollack wrote his entire financial plan on an index card.

It blew up. People loved the idea. Financial advice is often intentionally complicated. Obscurity lets advisors charge higher fees. But the most important parts are painfully simple. Here's how Pollack put it:

The card came out of chat I had regarding what I view as the financial industry's basic dilemma: The best investment advice fits on an index card. A commenter asked for the actual index card. Although I was originally speaking in metaphor, I grabbed a pen and one of my daughter's note cards, scribbled this out in maybe three minutes, snapped a picture with my iPhone, and the rest was history.

More advisors and investors caught onto the idea and started writing their own financial plans on a single index card.

I love the exercise, because it makes you think about what's important and forces you to be succinct.

So, here's my index-card financial plan:


Everything else is details. 

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