Why Darden Restaurants Needs to Sell Olive Garden Now

Darden Restaurants (NYSE: DRI  ) revealed its fourth-quarter and full-year fiscal 2014 earnings last Friday. The results mirrored the past several quarters as both Olive Garden's and Red Lobster's poor performance dragged down the company overall.

Despite the casual dining industry growing more competitive each quarter as a whole, several other restaurant companies like Bloomin' Brands (NASDAQ: BLMN  ) and The Cheesecake Factory (NASDAQ: CAKE  ) have been able to maintain or improve on their sales numbers.

Even though Darden Restaurants sold Red Lobster last month, Olive Garden still presents a big problem for the company. In fact, there are many reasons Olive Garden needs to be sold sooner rather than later.

Source: Olive Garden.

Earnings show Olive Garden is still hurting Darden Restaurants
During the fourth quarter, Darden Restaurants saw revenues of $2.32 billion, which were short of expectations of $2.33 billion, but above the $2.30 billion in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2013. However, $666.2 million of fourth-quarter revenues was drive by discontinued operations, mostly in Red Lobster. Overall, net income plunged 35% to $86.5 million.

For the year, net income fell 30.5% to $286.2 million, even though revenues rose 2.4% to $8.76 billion.

The story recently, however, has been same-store sales for Darden Restaurants. Looking at 2014 overall, same-store sales grew 2.7% and 1.6% for LongHorn Steakhouse and the Specialty Restaurant Group, respectively. In contrast, same-store sales for Olive Garden and Red Lobster fell 3.4% and 6%, respectively.

By comparison, same-store sales for Bloomin' Brands were flat despite a 1.6% drop in traffic. In its most recent quarter, The Cheesecake Factory saw same-store sales increase 0.9% despite bad winter weather. Both companies saw their net incomes fall moderately last quarter while revenues rose 6% and 4%, respectively.

Bloomin' Brands and The Cheesecake Factory dealt with the same obstacles Darden Restaurants faced last quarter, including bad weather, increases in commodity prices like beef, and an increasingly competitive environment. Yet, Darden Restaurants performed a lot worse. This is because Olive Garden is still a big cloud over Darden Restaurants.

Why Darden Restaurants needs to sell Olive Garden now
With now 837 locations, if Olive Garden wasn't too big of the Darden Restaurants pie before the Red Lobster sale, it certainly is now.

In fact, if we look at Darden Restaurants' portfolio purely in terms of total revenues, Olive Garden may soon account for just under 60% in total revenues. Even if we factor in recent trends regarding same-store sales, Olive Garden will still account for over half of Darden Restaurants' revenues for the next several years.

Credit: Darden Restaurants' annual financial data.

This introduces another problem -- same-store sales. Olive Garden has not shown any clear signs of a turnaround. Same-store sales for March, April, and May were -4.4%, -2.6%, and -3.3%, respectively.

Yet, Darden Restaurants again reiterated during its conference call last Friday its plans to invest in Olive Garden.

In what management calls a "brand renaissance," near-term plans for Olive Garden include an expanded menu with customization options, despite the desire to simplify operations and recipes. New PIastra grills are supposed to improve the quality and consistency of grilled items. Money is also set aside for new service training for the staff.

Additionally, a partnership with Ziosk will introduce tabletop tablets to begin testing in August. This is at the same time that Olive Garden's new online ordering system is to be completed.

Finally, new plate ware and ongoing remodeling goals are in process. This alone counters not only the recent investments in the new online ordering system, but the fact that management stated that the take-out business is now 8% of total sales for Olive Garden, and growing 10% annually.

Just some of the investments going into Olive Garden's "brand renaissance."  Source: Darden Restaurants.

Lastly, Italian restaurant industry trends show that the segment is currently in the mature phase of its life cycle. Through 2018, it is expected that the segment will increase at an annualized rate of just 1.1%. Carrabba's Italian Grill has been the worst performer of Bloomin' Brands. Despite contributing 17% of last fiscal year's sales, the Italian concept recently saw same-store sales fall 1.8%.

Even The Cheesecake Factory has hedged against Italian entrees for its restaurant concepts by offering a diversified menu. The Grand Lux Café was originally conceived to be mainly Italian, French, and Austrian. However, its menu has become more eclectic and offers a little of everything today.

The biggest reason to sell Olive Garden
Consistency is the biggest problem when it comes to Olive Garden and the other six existing brands within Darden Restaurants. Five of the six brands were created in 1990 or after. LongHorn Steakhouse was actually formed in 1981, a year before Olive Garden. However, the brand has consistently outperformed its segment.

Even Darden Restaurants admitted in a presentation earlier this year that four of the five brands within the Specialty Restaurant Group were aimed at Generation X customers. The Capital Grille instead targets higher-income customers.

Nevertheless, there is a good chance that inconsistency between Olive Garden and the other brands has led to some cannibalization of customers choosing one of the other six restaurants over Olive Garden, differentiation and customer targeting issues, and massive marketing investments annually.

While synergies may be a possibility within the other six restaurants, at this point, Olive Garden just seems too different to make sense for Darden Restaurants going forward.

What Darden Restaurants should look like to maximize profits and growth. Source: Darden Restaurants.

Bottom line
One could say that Olive Garden is the Achilles Heel of Darden Restaurants. However, its size makes it more of the heart of the overall company.

Instead, LongHorn Steakhouse should be the heart of the company going forward in order to take more market share away from companies like Bloomin' Brands.

The Specialty Restaurant Group needs to be the future. This is because based on recent earnings, these are the types of restaurants customers are willing to spend money in. This is especially highlighted when we consider the fact that visits to midscale and casual dining restaurants dropped last quarter on a year-over-year basis by 4% and 2%, respectively.

Leaked: Apple's next smart device (warning, it may shock you)
Apple recently recruited a secret-development "dream team" to guarantee its newest smart device was kept hidden from the public for as long as possible. But the secret is out, and some early viewers are claiming its everyday impact could trump the iPod, iPhone, and the iPad. In fact, ABI Research predicts 485 million of this type of device will be sold per year. But one small company makes Apple's gadget possible. And its stock price has nearly unlimited room to run for early in-the-know investors. To be one of them, and see Apple's newest smart gizmo, just click here!


Read/Post Comments (4) | Recommend This Article (2)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On June 24, 2014, at 10:38 PM, Taz wrote:

    As long as a restaurant is halfway decent and clean the decor doesn't mean squat to me. I rate it entirely on the food and service. And in that respect I will not set foot in a Darden restaurant again, ever.

    I used to be a fan of Red Lobster until they changed their menu and raised their prices inconsistent with their menu. If I want that kind of food now I go to Joe's Crab Shack.

    I am not a big fan of Italian (or what passes for it) food and Olive Garden never met my barest expectations. A family member worked there for a time and that was enough to convince me never to eat there again.

    The Cheesecake Factory is terrible on all fronts. Service, noise and unhealthy food. I've been there one time. They will never get another chance.

    Rather than eat at big chains I prefer the local mom & pop restaurants. The food is better as are the prices and if by chance the food isn't up to par you can usually talk directly to management or the cook.

    Darden is neither a good eating or investing experience.

  • Report this Comment On June 24, 2014, at 11:32 PM, mikecart1 wrote:

    Hi Taz,

    Thanks for the reply. I agree about food being the most important. Olive Garden seems to have changed their menu to the point where many items don't follow the same themes the restaurant intended to have a decade ago.

    I agree about Cheesecake Factory not being healthy. I remember seeing that it was voted the worst regarding calorie per entree recently.

  • Report this Comment On June 24, 2014, at 11:58 PM, SuntanIronMan wrote:

    A place called the Cheesecake Factory not healthy? Whaaaaaa? Shocking!!! Haha.

  • Report this Comment On June 25, 2014, at 7:01 PM, anisqoyo wrote:

    Mike:

    So Bloomin Brands can reinvent their stores but that's not possible with Olive Garden? If they sell Olive Garden, what do they do with the cash? Do they distribute it to their shareholders and become a much smaller company, with fewer employees, and then leave their current facilities? Or, do they go on a buying spree and try to integrate a whole lot of smaller companies under the Darden umbrella? I don't know that the restaurant business is conducive to that kind of business model. Finding growth vehicles like Olive Garden has been for Darden over the years ain't easy.

    Finally, there is no such thing as healthy foods and unhealthy foods. There exists, however, healthy and unhealthy diets. Eating at the Cheesecake Factory is not unhealthy. That's nonsense. If you want food that tastes good, and offers enough variety to keep everyone in the party happy, you're going to need to have some caloric content in your recipes. CCF offers over 200 menu items, and anyone who has worked in restaurants understands how difficult it can be consistently executing such a menu. But the CCF does it in exceptional fashion, unless people waiting two hours to eat there somehow translates into bad food and service. Right.

    Whether or not you eat in a CCF or an Olive Garden, if you are not happy with the food or service, I promise you that you can speak with a manager about it and that they will bend over backwards to correct the problem and make you happy.

Add your comment.

Sponsored Links

Leaked: Apple's Next Smart Device
(Warning, it may shock you)
The secret is out... experts are predicting 458 million of these types of devices will be sold per year. 1 hyper-growth company stands to rake in maximum profit - and it's NOT Apple. Show me Apple's new smart gizmo!

DocumentId: 3003553, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 8/21/2014 3:06:54 AM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...


Advertisement