Why Royal Caribbean Is Sending Its Coolest Ship to China

When Royal Caribbean's new top-of-the-line ship, Quantum of the Seas, arrives at its home port of Shanghai in May 2015, it will be the first time a Western cruise line has sent its newest ship to a Chinese city. The splashiest new vessels typically ply North American and European waters, catering to what have traditionally been the biggest markets for leisure cruises. But Royal Caribbean International (NYSE: RCL  ) Chairman and CEO Richard Fain said his company believes the Chinese cruise market -- already the fastest-growing in the world -- is positioned for unprecedented continuing growth.

Quantum of the Seas. Royal Caribbean International

Fain spoke to The Motley Fool about Royal Caribbean's plans for China, starting with the deployment of Quantum after a winter run of Caribbean cruises from New York City. Quantum is a huge boat laden with over-the-top features such as indoor skydiving and 18 restaurants. "We've had our newer and larger ships out there [to China]," Fain said, "but this is the first time anybody's even contemplated bringing a new ship, never mind a new ship as exciting and innovative as Quantum."

It's not that the North American market is fading. In fact, it's doing well, which is why Royal Caribbean plans to send other new boats to New York after Quantum ships out. But China is in a class by itself, due to the confluence of population, economics, and location.

"The middle class in China is simply exploding. Everybody knows that intellectually, but when you really see what an impact that makes, it's very powerful," Fain said. The company already has two ships successfully home-ported in Shanghai. "We've been growing in China at 40-plus percent per annum recently. We're fortunate that not only is the middle class growing, but almost all that growth is happening along the coast line, where the big cities are. We couldn't have a better demographic transformation to work in."

Perhaps the best analogy for the market potential of China's new middle class is the late 20th-century heyday of the 76-million-strong Baby Boomer generation here in the U.S. -- except that the scale of China's new consumer culture is much larger. "A lot of companies in the United States got tremendous benefits from the Baby Boomer demographic transformation. The transformation of the middle class in China makes the Baby Boomer generation pale," Fain said.

Within the next 10 years, economists project 630 million mostly urban middle-class Chinese, more than eight times the number of American Baby Boomers. According to McKinsey & Company, by 2022 the middle class will make up 75% of China's urban population, compared to 4% in 2000.

Because middle-class spending power is relatively new in China, its markets aren't saturated or suffering from consumer ennui. Like young American Boomers before them, today's middle-class Chinese have an appetite for designer goods and new, upscale experiences—like indoor skydiving on a luxury cruise to Korea or Japan.

Quantum's RipCord by iFly skydiving feature. Royal Caribbean International.

"You have a market that is hungry for this sort of thing," Fain said. To that end, Royal Caribbean is pulling out all the stops. "We're not going to put surplus capacity there. We're going to put our biggest and our best. Typically you don't want to devote your biggest and your best to a new market, but the Chinese are willing to pay for that."

Royal Caribbean is not the only cruise line adding capacity in Shanghai. Carnival's (NYSE: CCL  ) Sapphire Princess is in the middle of a four-month season there, and in the spring the company will home port its Greco-Roman-themed Costa Serena, which features a huge Turkish spa and a Grand Prix racing simulator, in Shanghai as well. That move will give Carnival a total of four ships based in China.

Fain said Royal Caribbean hasn't detailed what comes next in China, but "we think [Quantum] will do extremely well. We expect to continue to grow." It's clear that if China's middle-class growth stays on track, the rising tide could lift a lot of boats.

Your credit card may soon be completely worthless
The plastic in your wallet is about to go the way of the typewriter, the VCR, and the 8-track tape player. When it does, a handful of investors could stand to get very rich. You can join them -- but you must act now. An eye-opening new presentation reveals the full story on why your credit card is about to be worthless -- and highlights one little-known company sitting at the epicenter of an earth-shaking movement that could hand early investors the kind of profits we haven't seen since the dot-com days. Click here to watch this stunning video.


Read/Post Comments (3) | Recommend This Article (4)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On August 12, 2014, at 5:57 PM, ochairman wrote:

    This is great. We have cruised on Royal

    Caribbean and Celebrity a few times. Wonderful

    vacations!!!!!! First class all the way. I just hope

    there wont be too many China haters going to

    China.

  • Report this Comment On August 12, 2014, at 8:33 PM, snagglepussy wrote:

    Been on a cruise to Shanghai (Costa). Royal Caribbean will have a headache in filling crew positions.

    They smoke everywhere, toss cigarette butts (and spit) anywhere, need a mop to clean up a table at the buffet, they talk a 80 decibels at all times of the day and night and have no concept of civility.

    I was aghast at the way they cut in line when a fresh tray of an item that people were waiting for arrived at the buffet table. They loaded their plates to overfilling and bumped and shoved their way back out. Then I saw that half of that food was uneaten when they left.

    Do you think they tip?

  • Report this Comment On August 13, 2014, at 1:21 PM, CommonJoe wrote:

    As a loyal Crown and Annchor member of RCCL, I find it funny that they would send it to Chna. While it is an expanding market, this ship was promised to the NY and eastern seaboard market as a replacement vessel to Explorer of the Seas. All of the marketing was targeted and designed for that specific market. I wrote the RCCL board and was told much the same reason as explained in the article, but I reminded them like you stated that the US market is not falling off, in fact it is expanding and this ship would enhance that expansion. Now RCCL has made a considerable amount of people and Crown and Anchor members mad. I was told that the next Quantum class ship (Anthem of the Seas) will come to the NY market, yet eveything I read states it will port in South Hampton England and serve the European market. If true this is another example of RCCL being. disingeniune They need to remember the market base that put them there.

Add your comment.

Sponsored Links

Leaked: Apple's Next Smart Device
(Warning, it may shock you)
The secret is out... experts are predicting 458 million of these types of devices will be sold per year. 1 hyper-growth company stands to rake in maximum profit - and it's NOT Apple. Show me Apple's new smart gizmo!

DocumentId: 3065247, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 11/25/2014 11:25:53 PM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...


Advertisement