A spiffy-drop is when a stock drops more dollars per share in a single day than you paid in your own cost per share. It is the opposite of a spiffy-pop. This term was coined in the Motley Fool Rule Breakers community, as an elegant mot juste complementary to the Rule Breaker invention of spiffy-pop. 

So for example, if originally you paid $10.15 a share for your shares of Xerox, and then on some horrible future day Xerox stock drops $10.16, you have just suffered an ignoble spiffy-drop. It's probably worth pointing out that a spiffy-drop usually only happens to an investment that has done well. The ancient Norse saying that "it takes a spiffy-pop to eventually make a spiffy-drop" is more often true than not.

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