Recs

15

Avoid Sure Losses With These Investments

Don't let it get away!

Keep track of the stocks that matter to you.

Help yourself with the Fool's FREE and easy new watchlist service today.

After a long and strong bull market that has some talking about bubbles, retreating to the apparent safety of less risky investments may seem like a smart move. But in today's market environment, you're running out of options to both play things safe and preserve the purchasing power of your hard-earned money.

Locking in losses is not something most people can afford. Later in this article, I'll point you toward some investing ideas that can help you fight the risks that plague your portfolio, rather than simply accepting losses as inevitable.

Is inflation back?
A report from Bloomberg yesterday pointed out an uncomfortable truth for conservative investors sticking to fixed-income markets: Many so-called "safe" investments are actually guaranteeing investors that they'll lose some of the purchasing power of their savings to inflation. With the average five-year CD rate at 1.7%, savers aren't earning enough to make up for the impact of inflation, which has run at more than 3% during the past year. Even by going to top-paying banks like the banking divisions of Discover Financial (NYSE: DFS  ) and AIG (NYSE: AIG  ) , which are willing to pay higher rates in order to attract much-wanted capital from customers, you still can't come close to matching inflation, let alone beating it.

CDs aren't the only low-risk investment that isn't cutting the mustard lately. As Bill Gross tweeted earlier this week, five-year Treasuries yielding in the 1.7% to 1.8% range won't stand up to inflation and provide positive real returns. And it couldn't be clearer than with the Treasury's inflation-indexed TIPS, where five-year maturities carry a current negative real interest rate of -0.34% -- guaranteeing a loss in inflation-adjusted terms.

Two strategies to deal with inflation
Unfortunately, the recent uptick in inflation doesn't look like it will be disappearing anytime soon. Even as commodities have come crashing down over the past month, some key components in personal budgets have remained stubbornly high. Despite concerns about potential demand destruction, oil prices are hovering around the $100 level.

And even with the sharp correction in the high-flying silver market, prices are only back in line with their longer-term uptrend. That puts wind in the sails of shareholders in both bullion ETFs such as Sprott Physical Silver (NYSE: PSLV  ) and silver-related companies such as Silver Wheaton (NYSE: SLW  ) , which believe that precious metals are the only pure inflation hedge against inevitable monetary devaluation.

But others believe that precious metals could collapse a lot further from here. That's why a combination of two strategies might leave you in the best position to avoid inflation.

1. Hold cash.
If five-year CDs paying 2% can't beat inflation, then short-term savings accounts paying 1% certainly can't. But the rationale behind holding cash isn't about current yield but rather about having dry powder ready to capitalize on future opportunities. Especially if you believe that the stock market has come too far too fast lately, ramping up cash levels with your eyes on making smarter purchases in the near future makes plenty of sense.

2. Get cheap stocks with good dividends.
The other strategy is one that many Fools are following right now: picking dividend-paying stocks that are stable enough to hold up well even if the stock market turns south.

Some examples of such companies include Procter & Gamble (NYSE: PG  ) and PepsiCo (NYSE: PEP  ) . Both of those companies have recently shrunk package sizes in response to higher input costs. Those moves will help preserve margins and demonstrate the pricing power that top-branded blue-chips have over less popular competitors.

Yet you can find high dividends even in areas you might not expect. Intel (Nasdaq: INTC  ) , for instance, has an above-3% yield despite the overall trend of tech stocks paying little or nothing in dividends. It's also among the many big-name tech companies with cheap valuations below that of the overall market.

Be a winner
Investing isn't about sure things. You have to take some risk to earn decent returns. But rather than locking in a guaranteed loss, you'll do much better finding alternatives that give you a fighting chance to make real money in the long run.

Learn the basics of financial planning in our 13 Steps to Investing Foolishly. It'll get you on track to a great financial plan in no time.

Tune in every Monday and Wednesday for Dan's columns on retirement, investing, and personal finance.

Fool contributor Dan Caplinger is sad to see his old CDs maturing. He doesn't own shares of the companies mentioned in this article. The Motley Fool owns shares of PepsiCo and Intel and has bought calls on Intel. Motley Fool newsletter services have recommended buying shares of Intel, Discover Financial Services, Procter & Gamble, and PepsiCo, along with creating diagonal call positions on Intel and PepsiCo. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Fool's disclosure policy is a sure winner.


Read/Post Comments (3) | Recommend This Article (15)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On May 25, 2011, at 6:55 PM, EGTalbot wrote:

    Hold cash, maybe, but not all in USD. Why not diversify your cash a bit? FXF, FXC, FXA (which pays a nice dividend too) so if the bottom keeps falling out of the dollar, you may have a little protection. It's actually less risky than holding all cash in USD, though you could argue that some of the minor risks inherent with ETFs counter that.

  • Report this Comment On May 29, 2011, at 7:44 AM, Samfund wrote:

    Very good article. I am keeping plenty of cash for dry powder and the rest is in blue chips with good dividend yields including Intel....http://seekingalpha.com/article/263207-4-underperforming-blu...

  • Report this Comment On May 31, 2011, at 10:50 AM, Joulesh wrote:

    Intel is too risky. Pepsi and P&G are over-valued. If you want a safe place to park some money and earn nice dividends: Wallyworld! I am long WMT!

Add your comment.

Sponsored Links

Leaked: Apple's Next Smart Device
(Warning, it may shock you)
The secret is out... experts are predicting 458 million of these types of devices will be sold per year. 1 hyper-growth company stands to rake in maximum profit - and it's NOT Apple. Show me Apple's new smart gizmo!

DocumentId: 1499508, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 10/31/2014 2:34:16 PM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...

Dan Caplinger
TMFGalagan

Dan Caplinger has been a contract writer for the Motley Fool since 2006. As the Fool's Director of Investment Planning, Dan oversees much of the personal-finance and investment-planning content published daily on Fool.com. With a background as an estate-planning attorney and independent financial consultant, Dan's articles are based on more than 20 years of experience from all angles of the financial world.

Today's Market

updated Moments ago Sponsored by:
DOW 17,360.98 165.56 0.96%
S&P 500 2,013.54 18.89 0.95%
NASD 4,626.19 60.06 1.32%

Create My Watchlist

Go to My Watchlist

You don't seem to be following any stocks yet!

Better investing starts with a watchlist. Now you can create a personalized watchlist and get immediate access to the personalized information you need to make successful investing decisions.

Data delayed up to 5 minutes

Related Tickers

10/31/2014 2:18 PM
INTC $33.85 Up +1.27 +3.90%
Intel CAPS Rating: ****
PEP $96.02 Up +0.37 +0.39%
PepsiCo CAPS Rating: ****
PG $87.18 Up +0.24 +0.28%
Procter & Gamble CAPS Rating: ****
AIG $53.31 Up +0.38 +0.72%
American Internati… CAPS Rating: ****
DFS $63.80 Up +0.96 +1.52%
Discover Financial… CAPS Rating: ****
PSLV.DL2 $0.00 Down +0.00 +0.00%
SPROTT PHYSICAL SI… CAPS Rating: ***
SLW $17.49 Down -0.40 -2.24%
Silver Wheaton Cor… CAPS Rating: ****

Advertisement