Netflix Wants to Get You Arrested Next Year

Details are starting to trickle in about Netflix's (Nasdaq: NFLX  ) revival of Arrested Development that will stream exclusively through the video service next year.

Series creator Mitch Hurwitz, Netflix content chief Ted Sarandos, and several members of the Arrested Development cast took to the stage on Tuesday in a Netflix-sponsored event during the National Association of Broadcasters convention.

We already knew that the series would air next year, but here are some new tidbits that were revealed:

  • All 10 episodes of what will be the fourth season of the cult favorite will be made available at the same time, just as Netflix did with Lilyhammer -- its first original series -- two months ago.
  • The original plan was to have each episode offer a storyline for a single show character, but the series will now be more in line with the earlier episodes.
  • Hurwitz has not ruled out following this up with a fifth and sixth season, and confirmed that CBS' (NYSE: CBS  ) Showtime did try to acquire the show, but Hurwitz finally went with Netflix.

Netflix is really doing it. The company is really taking on Showtime and Time Warner's (NYSE: TWX  ) HBO with an impressive slate of original content.

Sarandos didn't reveal any viewership metrics for Lilyhammer, but he did say that a second season was in the works.

There will be even more excitement for this summer's House of Cards, headed up by David Fincher and Kevin Spacey. A recent addition is Hemlock Grove -- a horror series directed by Hostel creator Eli Roth -- that will have a 13-episode run early next year. Arrested Development will then be the fourth original content series, and that's if nothing happens between now and then.

You never know. Talented content creators that either can't get the funds they need or the directorial freedom they crave may begin flocking to Netflix the way that Howard Stern, Opie & Anthony, and other terrestrial radio renegades gravitated to Sirius XM Radio (Nasdaq: SIRI  ) . 

Sirius XM has it easier, of course. It really just has to stand out against the restrictive and regulated nature of traditional AM and FM radio. Of course it's going to draw the magnetic stars that color outside the lines. Netflix competes against HBO and Showtime that have far looser standards and programming restrictions than over-the-air networks.

Netflix can be the next great premium channel, and the first built entirely on streaming. And unlike Showtime and HBO, folks won't have to shell out big bucks to a costly cable or satellite television to make it possible.

Stream on
Motley Fool co-founder David Gardner has been a fan of Netflix as a disruptor for nearly a decade, but there's a new rule-breaking mutlibagger that's getting him excited about these days. Learn more in a free report that you can check out right now.

Motley Fool newsletter services have recommended buying shares of Netflix. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days.

Longtime Fool contributor Rick Munarriz has been a Netflix subscriber and shareholder since 2002. He does not own shares in any of the other stocks in this story. Rick is also part of the Rule Breakers newsletter research team, seeking out tomorrow's ultimate growth stocks a day early.


Read/Post Comments (8) | Recommend This Article (8)

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  • Report this Comment On April 19, 2012, at 12:53 PM, johnny2406 wrote:

    I just wonder why The Motley Fool trying to lure in the investors to invest in a dead company such as Netflix. What is even worse that the members and followers of Fool's are being deliberately mislead. Last year before Netflix fell to the ground it was promoted to be the biggest thing ever, another Dell another Apple... Now everyone knows that Netflix is struggling for survival yet Motley Fool is labeling it as a good investment.

    So I would like to know is it in the interest of The Motley Fool to fool investors or it is just single publishers such as Rick Aristotle Munarriz that lost their sanity but are allowed to mislead your memebers?

  • Report this Comment On April 19, 2012, at 1:01 PM, Risky88 wrote:

    struggling to survive? They have over 23 million signed up, the numbers they lost last year have already been gained plus some. With netflix expanding into canada and europe along with at least 100 million adults in the united states and a very good percentage with internet. Not to mention 600 million people live in europe.

    Yeah looks like its really dieing and theres no room for growth at all.

    Sure looks like the next blockbuster if ya ask me.

  • Report this Comment On April 19, 2012, at 1:22 PM, johnny2406 wrote:

    Really 23 million signed up, and what is the US population? Isn't it 312 million? So that is a real success... I guess we forgot about HBO's and other who own the entire market share. To get the facts right the population of Europe is 750 million not 600, positive? No not really because everyone owns satellite or cable and Netflix will spend millions only to try to spin the wheel.

    The revenue is inflated and the subscription data is exaggerated with growing competition, very bright future right?

    if this is a personal preference of a column writers and denial of the facts then I do not mind but if The Motley Fool stand behind this fading investment propagating false direction then we have a problem.

  • Report this Comment On April 19, 2012, at 1:44 PM, Risky88 wrote:

    you just proved my point even more.nflx literally penetrated a market that has been owned by satelite and cable for tens of years before netflix even existed. Its called a growing company,yeah the population is 312 million I was talking about adults and the fact is they havent even touched Europe yet, the fact is they are still expanding here in the united states. you think apple just magically started selling 30 million iphones over night? Even Dish which is a satellite company is getting into this business because they see the growth potential. This company wouldnt be a potential take over target if everyone thought it was doomed or dead as you put it. Go look at the charts of the growth of subscribers from start to finish, thats pretty impressive.

    I dont stand for these writers

    this is just logic

  • Report this Comment On April 19, 2012, at 2:07 PM, nhalden wrote:

    I'll believe AR when I see it. Many of the actors are doing other projects and or are Stars now.

    Jason Bateman has had a surge in his career, The kid from Superbad, etc...

    Plus AR is dated. This is a 7 year old show. Many shows since have come and gone that were inspired by AR and in many areas did better that it did.

    It's like "let's bring back Friends" - Why when you have basically the same show in "How I Met Your Mother". PLus the Friends cast don't want to come back...those that might aren't enough.

    NF passed on Terra Nova due to budget issues..how much do you think hireing the actors for AD will be? It may not be the $4M Episode that TN was estimated to be but it won't be cheap.

    In my opinion it's not going to happen...and frankly even if it did...SO WHAT..WHO CARES...it's certainly NOT a flagship series anyway. THAT WHY IT WAS CANCELLED.

  • Report this Comment On April 19, 2012, at 2:13 PM, johnny2406 wrote:

    Yes I proved the point that Neflix started something everyone believed is going to be the next thing just like Blockbusters and now following identical path. If Apple had 23 million phones sold it would have been already filing for bankruptcy, if Verizon or T-Mobile had 23 million subscribers it would have been already dead. So where is the point?

    Europe is not as gullible as you think, when everyone was texting in Europe from kids to adults US subscribers were making phone calls even though cell phones came from US. Now everyone discovered sms in US wow...

    I agree Neflix is going to take over the world where Dish, HBO's and other will go out of business and and switch over to Netflix. And yes all Fool's members should be notified of this in advance.

    Until then we will see if Netflix shares will hit $300 or $40. In the mean time The Motley Fool will continue to support the Netflix rapid growth propaganda and get everyone on sinking boat. Incidentally I wonder how many are still licking the wounds after Motly Fool propelled investors into buing Netflix at $300 last summer...

  • Report this Comment On April 19, 2012, at 6:06 PM, TMFBreakerRick wrote:

    Johnny, if your point is that Netflix is far away from $300, you win. However, Netflix today is also far away from $62 where it was just six months ago.

    Reading your post makes it seem as if I -- and others around Fooldom -- were down on Netflix until it hit $305 one glorious day in July -- and we all went bullish at the worst possible time. No. I've been generally bullish on NFLX since shortly after it went public in 2002. I blasted the rate hike in July at a time when the market was marching toward new highs because analysts disconnected with consumers. I've been wrong at times, of course. However, it has paid off to be bullish on Netflix since it bottomed out in Oct-Nov of last year.

    And 23.6 million homes -- and growing -- is now larger than any cable provider. Netflix had a horrendous Q3 last year. It did. It's recovering now.

  • Report this Comment On April 20, 2012, at 12:58 AM, MusiCali wrote:

    they originally recommended nflx at $20.

    They don't give sell signals unless something has changed fundamentally with their original thesis.

    the bought bidu at 20 ( or less), amzn at 3.

    Do you think they would have caught even close to that whole ride if they tried to time their stocks and get out at what they believed to be a top?

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