CEO of the Year: Whole Foods Market vs. Lions Gate Entertainment

Following eight straight weeks of profiling top-notch CEOs, the time has officially come for you and other members of The Motley Fool community to decide who is the best CEO in 2012.

The methodology behind the voting is simple. Similar to an NCAA-style basketball bracket, the eight CEOs will be pitted into four match-ups that the community will have one week to vote on. Next week we'll release the results of the previous week's voting, and the remaining four CEOs will again be bracketed for voting. Voting will continue over the next couple of weeks until we have a winner, which will be unveiled at the beginning of December.

As you can see, the ball really is in your court and you do have a say in who merits the coveted title of The Motley Fool's chosen CEO of the year. Below the voting bracket I've included a quick synopsis of the match-up; however, I encourage you to revisit the nomination article for a more complete explanation of why that particular CEO was nominated for this award.

The delivery guys: Whole Foods Market  (Nasdaq: WFM  )  vs. Lions Gate Entertainment  (NYSE: LGF  )
This last match-up pits against each other two companies that delivered amazing results in the face of weak growth environments. On one side we have the Whole Foods co-CEO duo of John Mackey and Walter Robb, who have fended off rising food costs and delivered strong margins, all while taking good care of their employees and the community. In the other corner is Lions Gate's Jon Feltheimer, who helped negotiate the purchase of the Twilight franchise and brought the No. 3 highest-grossing movie to box office this year, The Hunger Games. Which one delivered the more impressive 2012 is up to you to decide.

Check back for results
Be sure to check out the other CEO match-ups at the links below, and check back next week when we unveil the results and highlight a new round of voting to whittle the field down even further.

It's hard to believe that a grocery store could book investors more than 30 times their initial investment, but that's just what Whole Foods has done for those who saw the organic trend coming some 20 years ago. However, it may not be too late to participate in the long-term growth of this organic foods powerhouse. In this brand-new premium report on the company, we walk through the key must-know items for every Whole Foods investor, including the main opportunities and threats facing the company. We're also providing a full year of regular analyst updates to go with it, so make sure to claim your copy today by clicking here.


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  • Report this Comment On November 16, 2012, at 5:33 PM, TotalFoolio wrote:

    Whole Foods has been wack as of late. They lowered minimum and maximum wages, put percentage based caps on raises, which are biased to those who are higher paid, and lowered the frequency of raises. This goes against the core value of teem members happiness and excellence. They do lots of good stuff too, charity, whole trade/fair trade etc. but they gotta look out for the people on the bottom. My vote's still for the Whole though.

  • Report this Comment On November 16, 2012, at 6:33 PM, greenbiz wrote:

    Actually totalfoolio, Whole Foods recently raised the raise cap to everyone! The frequency of raises used to be every 6 months years ago, but now it is once a year which is actually much better than most businesses. In the past few years WFM has also offered team members healthy eating initiatives and offered higher employee discounts based on health. Team members can also use their flexible spending account each year on acupuncture, massage, and alternative medicine. The PTO rate also increases the longer you work there. Pretty amazing!

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