This Mortgage REIT Will Soon Dwarf Annaly

When it comes to double-digit returns, it's hard to beat the mortgage REIT sector, particularly since Federal Reserve actions since the financial crisis have kept short-term interest rates at historic lows. The shining example of this type of real estate investment trust is Annaly Capital (NYSE: NLY  ) , the original investor in mortgage-backed securities insured by government sponsored entities such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

Annaly has built its reputation on stellar yields produced by a savvy management team, building the business from its inception in 1997 to a company with a market capitalization of $15 billion and assets topping $133 billion. But there's a relative newcomer that seems intent on knocking Annaly off of its throne: American Capital Agency (NASDAQ: AGNC  ) .

A great year for mortgage REITs
American Capital Agency went public in 2008, a year that saw other mREITs such as Hatteras Financial  (NYSE: HTS  ) , and Armour Residential  (NYSE: ARR  ) enter the territory as well. Groundbreaker Annaly had shown that the carry trade could be lucrative, and the ultra-low short-term interest rate environment created a perfect climate for new companies to enter the playing field.

Both Hatteras and Armour have been successful, but American Capital Agency, under the guidance of Gary Kain, has seen explosive growth in its short life. While Hatteras' market cap sits at less than $3 billion and Armour's is under $2.5 billion, American Capital Agency sports a $13 billion capitalization. Annaly's current market cap is $15 billion, showing that American Capital is hot on its heels and could overtake the venerable mREIT in short order.

Too big, too fast?
American Capital Agency has accrued nearly as much in assets as Annaly, too. At the end of 2012, the trusts held approximately $100.5 billion, and $133.5 billion, consecutively, and it looks like Annaly may lose its premier spot sooner rather than later: American Capital Agency held a mere $58 billion in assets at the end of 2011, meaning that it nearly doubled its asset base in one year's time. How did it accomplish this?

Most of the credit for the trust's growth and success belongs to Kain, a shrewd manager who cut his teeth overseeing billions of dollars in assets at Freddie Mac. When Kain took over the reins at American Capital Agency in 2009, the company had only $2 billion in assets. Kain began building it up to its current robust level by taking advantage of lucrative financing opportunities, and using the insights gained at his former employment to reinvest in and grow the company.

Certainly, the exponential growth experienced by American Capital Agency is unusual, but there seems to be no cause for alarm. The trust still pays out a hefty $1.25 quarterly dividend, even as it approaches the girth of Annaly -- something that other mREITs must envy. As American Capital Agency continues its inexorable rise, its investors are no doubt happy to go along for the ride.

There's no question Annaly Capital's double-digit dividend is eye-catching. But can investors count on that payout sticking around? With the Federal Reserve keeping interest rates at historically low levels, Annaly has had to scramble to defend its bottom line. In The Motley Fool's premium research report on Annaly, senior analysts Ilan Moscovitz and Matt Koppenheffer uncover the key challenges the company faces and divulge three reasons investors may consider buying it. Simply click here now to claim your copy today!


Read/Post Comments (1) | Recommend This Article (10)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On April 11, 2013, at 10:14 AM, Kerry73 wrote:

    Neither the author nor Kain are known to me, but unless my memory fails me Mr. Kain was working at Freddie Mac handling billions when the American public had to rescue Freddie from oblivion.

    As a result of that knowledge, I'm going to have to rethink my position with AGNC. Of course, it does somewhat explain how AGNC's explosive growth has come about.

    Long AGNC & NLY

Add your comment.

Sponsored Links

Leaked: Apple's Next Smart Device
(Warning, it may shock you)
The secret is out... experts are predicting 458 million of these types of devices will be sold per year. 1 hyper-growth company stands to rake in maximum profit - and it's NOT Apple. Show me Apple's new smart gizmo!

DocumentId: 2355651, ~/Articles/ArticleHandler.aspx, 8/21/2014 3:07:18 AM

Report This Comment

Use this area to report a comment that you believe is in violation of the community guidelines. Our team will review the entry and take any appropriate action.

Sending report...


Advertisement