McDonald's Secret Plan: To Serve Breakfast All Day

Will the nation's biggest fast food chain start serving breakfast all day? According to Motley Fool contributor John Maxfield, there's at least one reason to believe so.

Mar 9, 2014 at 8:45AM


Here's a conspiracy theory about McDonald's (NYSE:MCD) that may turn out to be true: I believe the fast food giant is secretly working on plans to begin serving breakfast all day.

This isn't just a random guess. In fact, I'm not even the first person to bring it up over the past few weeks. At the end of February, the Associated Press published a piece titled "McDonald's eyes longer breakfast hours."

The article was based on a handful of cryptic quotes from the head of McDonald's domestic operations, Jeff Stratton. "We know, as an example, that breakfast on the weekend cut off at 10:30 doesn't go very well," Stratton said in an interview.


But when asked to provide details, he deferred. "Well, we're just beginning," he said. "We're just taking a look at it."

So, here's the question: Is McDonald's just "taking a look," as Stratton seems to suggest, or could there be something more to this?

I believe it's the latter. And I say so for one reason.

In the past, logistics have been the most commonly cited issue holding McDonald's back from extending its breakfast hours. Specifically, its kitchens are designed in such a way that breakfast and lunch items can't be prepared simultaneously.

This may seem odd, but it's important to remember that everything McDonald's does, from how its restaurants are laid out to the structure of its supply chain, is organized to maximize efficiency. As a result, if frying hash browns interferes with preparing French fries, then something's gotta give.

But -- and here's where this transforms from a conspiracy theory into a reasonable suspicion -- McDonald's is pouring millions of dollars into removing the logistical roadblock.

At a McDonald's investor day four months ago, a number of executives discussed the chain's decision to scale back its reimagining of restaurants in favor of "prioritizing some investments in our kitchens to deliver enhanced service capabilities and menu choices to our customers."


Among other things, these investments include new assembly tables that will be installed in the kitchens of all restaurants by 2014, the purpose of which is to offer "greater customization by accommodating more ingredients" and to "improve overall speed of service."

This is all very fine and well, of course, but it also presents McDonald's with the opportunity to make the structural changes necessary to accommodate dual meal services.

And why would it not?

If it's true that McDonald's has "long entertained the idea of serving breakfast throughout the day," as the Associated Press reported, then this would be the perfect opportunity to make that possible.

All of this remains conjecture, of course. But with Taco Bell entering the national breakfast scene and rumors that quick-service chains such as Chipotle Mexican Grill could soon do so as well, neither customers nor investors should be surprised if McDonald's moves to defend its morning fast-food fiefdom by all means necessary -- even if that entails serving sausage biscuits at noon in the place of Big Macs.

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John Maxfield has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool recommends and owns shares of McDonald's. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

A Financial Plan on an Index Card

Keeping it simple.

Aug 7, 2015 at 11:26AM

Two years ago, University of Chicago professor Harold Pollack wrote his entire financial plan on an index card.

It blew up. People loved the idea. Financial advice is often intentionally complicated. Obscurity lets advisors charge higher fees. But the most important parts are painfully simple. Here's how Pollack put it:

The card came out of chat I had regarding what I view as the financial industry's basic dilemma: The best investment advice fits on an index card. A commenter asked for the actual index card. Although I was originally speaking in metaphor, I grabbed a pen and one of my daughter's note cards, scribbled this out in maybe three minutes, snapped a picture with my iPhone, and the rest was history.

More advisors and investors caught onto the idea and started writing their own financial plans on a single index card.

I love the exercise, because it makes you think about what's important and forces you to be succinct.

So, here's my index-card financial plan:


Everything else is details. 

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