Who Wins if ‘Godzilla’ Becomes a Kaiju-Sized Hit?

Three Fools discuss whether the “King of All Monsters” has the stomping power to deliver at the box office.

May 4, 2014 at 7:56AM

Gz Film Detail Main Poster

Godzilla stomps into U.S. theaters on May 16. Credit: Legendary Pictures.

Lost amid the hype for The Amazing Spider-Man 2 and X-Men: Days of Future Past, Legendary Pictures and Time Warner (NYSE:TWX) have Godzilla roaring his way into theaters on May 16. Can the "King of All  Monsters" deliver?

Host Ellen Bowman puts this question to analysts Nathan Alderman and Tim Beyers in this week's episode of 1-Up On Wall Street, The Motley Fool's web show in which we talk about the big-money names behind your favorite movies, toys, video games, comics, and more.

Tim says that initial reaction to Godzilla appears to be positive. The movie's style also seems to recall the slow and terrifying reveal of director Gareth Edwards' Monsters, an independent movie that vastly out-earned its modest budget. Vulture quotes Edwards as saying he was also influenced by Jurassic Park, which holds off showing the biggest dinosaurs till more than an hour into the movie.

How that will play with audiences is impossible to know at this point. But initial tracking says we can expect a $60 million debut and $500 million to $600 million in worldwide grosses by the time the movie ends its run in theaters. An impressive -- and likely profitable -- performance if those numbers hold, Tim says.

Nathan says that Warner investors shouldn't expect a massive hit. Last summer's giant monsters vs. giant robots epic, Pacific Rim, had trouble appealing to American audiences. Foreign moviegoers helped push the movie's overall tally to better than $400 million in grosses, yet that probably wasn't enough to produce profits after accounting for marketing, distribution, and revenue sharing with theater operators.

The good news? Legendary CEO Thomas Tull has said that any sequel would likely stay with Warner, which opens the possibility of a genre-building series wherein the worlds of Godzilla and Pacific Rim combine into a glorious panoply of giant monsters and giant robots facing off in theaters regularly.

Now it's your turn to weigh in using the comments box below. What do you expect from Godzilla? Can it win at the box office despite heavy competition from Marvel superheroes? Click the video to watch as Ellen puts Nathan and Tim on the spot, and then be sure to follow us on Twitter for more segments and regular geek news updates!

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Ellen Bowman owns shares of Apple and Netflix. Nathan Alderman owns shares of Apple. Tim Beyers owns shares of Apple, Google (A and C class), Netflix, and Time Warner. The Motley Fool recommends Apple, Google (A and C shares), and Netflix. The Motley Fool owns shares of Apple, Google (A and C class), and Netflix. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

4 in 5 Americans Are Ignoring Buffett's Warning

Don't be one of them.

Jun 12, 2015 at 5:01PM

Admitting fear is difficult.

So you can imagine how shocked I was to find out Warren Buffett recently told a select number of investors about the cutting-edge technology that's keeping him awake at night.

This past May, The Motley Fool sent 8 of its best stock analysts to Omaha, Nebraska to attend the Berkshire Hathaway annual shareholder meeting. CEO Warren Buffett and Vice Chairman Charlie Munger fielded questions for nearly 6 hours.
The catch was: Attendees weren't allowed to record any of it. No audio. No video. 

Our team of analysts wrote down every single word Buffett and Munger uttered. Over 16,000 words. But only two words stood out to me as I read the detailed transcript of the event: "Real threat."

That's how Buffett responded when asked about this emerging market that is already expected to be worth more than $2 trillion in the U.S. alone. Google has already put some of its best engineers behind the technology powering this trend. 

The amazing thing is, while Buffett may be nervous, the rest of us can invest in this new industry BEFORE the old money realizes what hit them.

KPMG advises we're "on the cusp of revolutionary change" coming much "sooner than you think."

Even one legendary MIT professor had to recant his position that the technology was "beyond the capability of computer science." (He recently confessed to The Wall Street Journal that he's now a believer and amazed "how quickly this technology caught on.")

Yet according to one J.D. Power and Associates survey, only 1 in 5 Americans are even interested in this technology, much less ready to invest in it. Needless to say, you haven't missed your window of opportunity. 

Think about how many amazing technologies you've watched soar to new heights while you kick yourself thinking, "I knew about that technology before everyone was talking about it, but I just sat on my hands." 

Don't let that happen again. This time, it should be your family telling you, "I can't believe you knew about and invested in that technology so early on."

That's why I hope you take just a few minutes to access the exclusive research our team of analysts has put together on this industry and the one stock positioned to capitalize on this major shift.

Click here to learn about this incredible technology before Buffett stops being scared and starts buying!

David Hanson owns shares of Berkshire Hathaway and American Express. The Motley Fool recommends and owns shares of Berkshire Hathaway, Google, and Coca-Cola.We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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