50 Things You Should Feel Great About

There are no jobs. Washington is a mess. Greece is nearly bankrupt. Italy isn't far behind. North Dakota is flooded. Arizona is an inferno. Oil is nearly $100 a barrel. Forty Mexicans were killed by drug violence in one day last week. This guy fell to his death catching a baseball in Texas as his six-year-old son looked on.

Welcome to 2011. And welcome to the 24-hour news cycle. It lives on this stuff.

Good news is out there -- you just have to look for it. In the spirit of optimism, here are 50 things you should feel good about.

50. Biomedical gerontologist Aubrey de Grey thinks the first person to live to see their 150th birthday is already born. Medical technology is awesome.

49. The average American spends less than half as much of their income on food today as they did in the 1940s. No one ever talks about long-term food deflation.

48. Stock returns only look awful if you use the dot-com bubble as a starting point. Since 1995, the Dow has returned about 11% per year (including dividends). That's a healthy return by any standard.

47. Mark Zuckerberg has made over $3,400 per minute of Facebook's existence. Capitalism is alive and well.

46. A cancer-stricken man from Eritrea just received an artificially grown trachea derived from his own cells. More awesome medical technology at work.

45. Bad news: 68% of Americans think the country is on the wrong track. Positive spin: The exact same percentage felt that way in 1991. Pessimism is nothing new.

44. Part of the reason Medicare and Social Security are money pits is because people are living much longer than expected. I can think of worse problems.

43. The U.K.'s economic dominance fell sometime in the late nineteenth century, but for the most part, it's been a nice place to live ever since.

42. Many fear the U.S. economy will end up like Japan. Next time you hear that, remember that unemployment in Japan hasn't been above 5.6% in the past 20 years.

41. MIT just created solar cells that can be printed on paper or other fabric.

40. If you're reading this article, you're part of the 30% of the world with Internet access. 70% of the planet would love to be in your shoes.

39. Nine percent of American households are millionaires. It's not just the very top who are doing well.

38. GDP per capita in the United States is 12 times higher than it is in China. Remember that next time someone mentions how domineering China's economy is.

37. 9.2% of the population is unemployed, or 16.4% if you count those who've given up looking. Positive spin: 83% of the country is gainfully employed.

36. Overall cancer death rates in the U.S. fell more than 1.5% per year from 2001-2007. Falling cancer death rates have saved nearly 1 million Americans over the past two decades.

35. 2010 was a record year for both patent applications and patent grants. Innovation is nowhere near dead.

34. Today's personal savings rate is six times higher than it was in 2005.

33. American households' debt load is now the lowest since the early 1990s.

32. Life expectancy for someone born today is eight years longer than someone born in 1960.

31. Three years ago, many thought Ford (NYSE: F  ) was toast. Today, it's profitable and growing, all without a bailout. Smart management still wins.

30. One of corporate America's biggest challenges right now is what to do with record amounts of cash. Nice problem to have.

29. TARP will cost taxpayers an amount that rounds to zero in the grand scheme of things.

28. 115 stocks in the S&P 500 are within 10% of their all-time highs.

27. Retirement savings are nearing an all-time high.

26. A BMW plant in South Carolina gets two-thirds of its power from methane siphoned off a nearby trash dump.

25. Even in inflation-adjusted terms, the U.S. is exporting more stuff than ever before.

24. Real manufacturing output is 75% higher than it was in the 1970s.

23. Some of the best universities, including MIT and Harvard, are putting video lectures of entire courses online for free.

22. Some think the U.S. has a 200-year supply of coal. If they're only fractionally right, you and I never have to worry about turning the lights on.

21. In 1900, 44% of all American jobs were in farming. Think about that: Almost half of all ingenuity was devoted to eating.

20. Ten years ago, cell phone technology consisted of a calculator and game called Snake. Today you can watch full-length movies, file your taxes, get driving directions, and watch live TV on a phone half the size and a fraction of the price.

19. Nearly 30% of Americans over age 25 have a bachelor's degree. In the 1960s, that figure was less than 10%.

18. Unemployment fell by 60% from 1933-1936, and by 35% from 1982-1984. Once a recovery finds its footing, the rebound is usually swift.

17. Average gas prices today are lower than they were three years ago.

16. The average American now retires at age 62. One hundred years ago, the average American died at age 51.

15. As a percentage of GDP, the federal government was in substantially more debt after World War II than it is today.

14. Almost all news on the Internet is free -- even the really good stuff.

13. You had to be rich to get on an airplane in 1950.

12. In the U.S. and Europe, death by stroke has fallen 70% since the 1950s.

11. As a percentage of income, housing hasn't been this cheap in over a decade.

10. Before 1975, it could cost thousands of dollars in commissions to buy or sell stock. Today, it costs somewhere between nothing and $10.

9. In the early 1970s, an influential study using a computer model called World3 predicted the world would exhaust all known supplies of oil and natural gas by 1992. Dire predictions are nothing new.

8. Last year's payroll tax cut will save the average household $1,000 this year.

7. "Five years have seldom passed away in which some book or pamphlet has not been published pretending to demonstrate that the wealth of the nation was fast declining ... manufactures decaying, and trade undone." Adam Smith wrote that ... in 1775. Again, pessimism is nothing new.

6. The home ownership rate is plunging. Most of those who never should have owned a home in the first place no longer do.

5. New home construction is now one-third the trend rate of household formation. Nothing bodes better for an eventual housing rebound.

4. Traffic deaths per 100,000 people have fallen by half since the late 1960s.

3. If you've owned stocks since early 2009, you've enjoyed one of the biggest bull markets in history.

2. Dollar weakness is a matter of perception. The U.S. Dollar Index today isn't far from where it was in the late 1970s.

1. Only 4% of humans get to live in America. Odds are, you're one of them.

Check back every Tuesday and Friday for Morgan Housel's columns on finance and economics.

Fool contributor Morgan Housel doesn't own shares in any of the companies mentioned in this article. Follow him on Twitter @TMFHousel. The Motley Fool owns shares of Ford Motor. Motley Fool newsletter services have recommended buying shares of Ford Motor. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


Read/Post Comments (52) | Recommend This Article (277)

Comments from our Foolish Readers

Help us keep this a respectfully Foolish area! This is a place for our readers to discuss, debate, and learn more about the Foolish investing topic you read about above. Help us keep it clean and safe. If you believe a comment is abusive or otherwise violates our Fool's Rules, please report it via the Report this Comment Report this Comment icon found on every comment.

  • Report this Comment On July 15, 2011, at 11:56 AM, TMFKopp wrote:

    Great work Morgan, I feel better already!

    Matt

  • Report this Comment On July 15, 2011, at 4:22 PM, midnightmoney wrote:

    51. Progress on another front: NY is normal enough to have legalised gay marriage. I feel good about that.

  • Report this Comment On July 15, 2011, at 4:31 PM, StevesStox wrote:

    I really enjoyed your positive article and agree that there is too much 24/7 doom and gloom out there. However...

    In fairness, you should report the fact that...

    Healthcare has never been as cost prohibitive in this country's history as it is right now..

    The US now incarcerates the most people per capita of all countries in the world outside of Russia...

    The wealthiest 1% control more of this country's overall wealth than they have at any point in the last 100 years..

    I could go on, but you get the point.

  • Report this Comment On July 15, 2011, at 4:40 PM, catoismymotor wrote:

    #52 - Cato has never been seriously harmed by the puff adder that lives beneath his refrigerator.

  • Report this Comment On July 15, 2011, at 4:42 PM, shoemaker17 wrote:

    40. If you're reading this article, you're part of the 30% of the world with Internet access. 70% of the planet would love to be in your shoes(which they made, BTW).

  • Report this Comment On July 15, 2011, at 4:43 PM, TMFHousel wrote:

    ^ Brilliant.

  • Report this Comment On July 15, 2011, at 4:46 PM, shoemaker17 wrote:

    hopefully the fool is still around in 20 years where No. 17 is:

    Last year, the poorest 20% of the world has to wait 2 hours to charge their jetpacks. Back in 2011, they didn't even have jetpacks!

  • Report this Comment On July 15, 2011, at 7:02 PM, Thaeger wrote:

    #54(?): According to some Mayan analysts, problems such as poverty, hunger, lousy 80's movie remakes, disease, trying to find a parking spot downtown, war, and a hundred other societal ills will essentially be solved in the next 18 months.

  • Report this Comment On July 15, 2011, at 7:36 PM, sailrmac wrote:

    #55 I'm on vacation next week. Hiking, biking sailing, beautiful moutains, etc. all whiel getting paid for it. :)

  • Report this Comment On July 15, 2011, at 10:11 PM, maiday2000 wrote:

    Not to rain on your parade of happiness, but #37 is factually wrong, unless you count being retired as being employed. The labor force participation rate is only 64.1% and falling. Technically, less tan 50% of the people in this country actually "work."

  • Report this Comment On July 15, 2011, at 10:34 PM, wrenchbender57 wrote:

    OK Maiday, Morgan should have said that 83% of those that can and want to work have jobs. Picky, picky! I think most of us know what he meant. And I know that some think those statistics are a bit off. But, that is what most economists are using right now.

  • Report this Comment On July 16, 2011, at 1:02 AM, bordereiver wrote:

    Fantastic! After listening to and watching fear mongers try to scare us (apparently sells well) it was great to read your list.

  • Report this Comment On July 16, 2011, at 3:19 AM, einzling44 wrote:

    Interesting, unexpected and funny.

    Thank You

  • Report this Comment On July 16, 2011, at 6:34 AM, TMFMarlowe wrote:

    Great piece, Morgan.

    John

  • Report this Comment On July 16, 2011, at 10:05 AM, michaelmar wrote:

    # 44- the reason that Social Security & Medicare are money pits is because the politicians do not want to adjust the program to account for the fact that people are living longer. See # 16- most people never collected Social Security or Medicare- they died first.

  • Report this Comment On July 16, 2011, at 12:01 PM, wrenchbender57 wrote:

    I agree with bordereiver. Bad new sells so that is what we get most of the time. Good in a way as that tends to put some stocks on sale now and then. But it is also depressing. Great to see the good side of the news. Thanks Morgan!

  • Report this Comment On July 16, 2011, at 12:33 PM, wrenchbender57 wrote:

    Re: Percent of population in the US that works vs total population. 2000 census shows almost 40% of the population that is either too young to work or at retirement age. I could not find the 2010 census info. If someone else can would appreciate the link.

    Anyway, that leaves about 60% of folks that are available to work. Taking out some disabled, looking for work, etc. not too difficult to see how it could be possible that about 50% of the total population is actually working. Doesn't look all that dire to me.

  • Report this Comment On July 16, 2011, at 1:08 PM, wrenchbender57 wrote:

    Regarding Michaelmar's comment: People that contributed and died before collecting is offset by folks in the early system that retired and collected far more than they contributed, disabled folks that get SSI payments and survivor benefits that are being paid.

  • Report this Comment On July 16, 2011, at 1:43 PM, deckdawg wrote:

    I appreciate the optimism. Here's two more I've posted before:

    Americans own 52T dollars in assets. 18T of those are owned by folks over 65. So, the assets we leave behind should more than outweigh the Federal debt we leave behind.

    The SS Trust fund might be an imaginary fiction, but the government does have a substantial amount of real savings tucked away in the form of deferred taxes on IRA & 401K accounts. A lot of folks living in retirement for 30 years will be paying taxes at close to the same rate as when they were working. (I suspect that quite a few Fools that have invested wisely & live modestly will actually pay more in taxes once past the age of 70 than when they were working).

  • Report this Comment On July 16, 2011, at 1:47 PM, TMFRhino wrote:

    "2010 was a record year for both patent applications and patent grants. Innovation is nowhere near dead."

    Although, you could argue some of the patents they're allowing will stifle innovation.... Hence why every other tech article is about some patent dispute from allowing patents on overly vague ideas.

    As always, enjoyed the article!

    -Eric

  • Report this Comment On July 16, 2011, at 3:55 PM, rhbarca wrote:

    And don't forget:

    Summer, Buddy Holly, the working folly

    Good Golly Miss Molly, and boats

    Hammersmith Palais, the Bolshoi Ballet

    Jump back in the alley add nanny goats...

    AND ROCK AND ROLL!

  • Report this Comment On July 16, 2011, at 5:06 PM, TMFBent wrote:

    Morgan, you know it's unpatriotic not to complain constantly.

  • Report this Comment On July 16, 2011, at 6:39 PM, SwampBull wrote:

    What is that smell? It is unfamiliar... not dank politics... not doomsday pessimism... not economic or psychological depression...

    Oh, it's a breath of fresh air! How wonderful! Why even watch cable news when the world around us is so much more beautiful than the pain and suffering seen on TV? Why grow fat and miserable watching a jaded broadcaster belittle society? Why not go outside, ride a bike, read a book, work hard, spend time with family and friends?

    The information age has an insidious poison of over-exposure which disconnects us and arouses fear that we are not capable of meeting the challenges of tomorrow. While researching stocks and browsing articles is a fine way to spend some time, do not forget that family and people are what really matter. Watch out for friends or family who wall off as technology addicts. We are not on this planet to stare at our phones and televisions between meals, after a long day of work at the computer. Enjoy life!

  • Report this Comment On July 17, 2011, at 5:49 PM, Mliaom wrote:

    Love this article. We need more of these now some one please show this to Tea Party.

  • Report this Comment On July 18, 2011, at 1:01 AM, hbofbyu wrote:

    83 percent of all U.S. stocks are in the hands of 1 percent of the people.

    An all time record of over 40 million Americans are now on food stamps.

    In 2010 the U.S. government issued almost as much new debt as the rest of the governments of the world combined.

    43 percent of Americans have less than $10,000 saved up for retirement.

    For the first time in U.S. history, banks own a greater share of residential housing net worth in the United States than all individual Americans put together.

    In 1950, the ratio of the average executive’s paycheck to the average worker’s paycheck was about 30-to-1. Since 2000, that ratio has exploded to between 300- and 500-to-one.

    The bottom 50 percent of income earners in the U.S. now collectively own less than 1 percent of the nation’s wealth.

    Between 2002 and 2007 two-thirds of income increases in the U.S. went to the wealthiest 1% of all Americans.

    Approximately 21 percent of all children in the United States are living below the poverty line in 2010—the highest rate in 20 years.

    1 in every 31 adult persons is either in jail or prison or on parole or probation. 1 in 9 Black men between the ages of 20-34 are in prison.

    There are now over 1 million members of criminal gangs inside the country and growing. These 1 million gang members are responsible for approx. 80% of the crimes committed in the United States each year.

    For the second year in a row, the U.S. military has lost more troops to suicide than it has to combat in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    In 2001 Osama Bin-Laden killed 3,ooo Americans. 5,700 have died and 34,000 seriously injured since to kill Osama bin-Laden.

  • Report this Comment On July 18, 2011, at 4:41 AM, KurtEng wrote:

    The article was worth reading just for the Adam Smith quote. Great.

  • Report this Comment On July 18, 2011, at 7:05 AM, Ellen1920 wrote:

    "16. The average American now retires at age 62. One hundred years ago, the average American died at age 51."

    Who is this average American? And what makes her so average? Do all average Americans retire at 62, or just that one? I think you meant "In America, the average age of retirement is 62".

  • Report this Comment On July 18, 2011, at 7:14 AM, Ellen1920 wrote:

    #56a. The apartment we own is finally rented, after too many months of much-needed renovations (it had knob and tube wiring). $$ in!

    #56b. I got a little inheritance and put it right into a CD for 6 months while I read the Fool and learn what to do with it and how. $$ for later.

    #56c. Going to the lake for a week! $$ out and bliss in.

  • Report this Comment On July 18, 2011, at 12:19 PM, XMFAlaska wrote:

    Love it. Thanks for the perspective.

  • Report this Comment On July 18, 2011, at 12:20 PM, foolishmatthias wrote:

    Wonderful positive article about many not-so-little things that should matter to us.

    However, I strongly disagree with #2... Dollar weakness "is only a perception" if you're the typical American staying at home and caring about export/import of goods. As a traveller and someone who once dreamed of retiring to somewhere in the Mediterranean, Dollar weakness is not just a perception but a real loss of foreign-currency purchasing power. I used to pay some 80-odd US cents per Euro, now it's above $1.40, and I wouldn't be surprised to see it climb even higher despite the challenges of the Euro zone, mainly due to the US' debt struggles. It doesn't look much better westward, where I used to get 110+ Yen per Dollar just a few years ago and now have to do with 30%-or-so less.

  • Report this Comment On July 18, 2011, at 12:43 PM, 123spot wrote:

    Thanks, Morgan. It's a beautiful day and the pool feels great. Everybody, find one quickly! Gratitude for all I have, prayer for all to share in the blessings we enjoy.

  • Report this Comment On July 18, 2011, at 3:05 PM, mtf00l wrote:

    hbofbyu,

    Thanks for the balance.

  • Report this Comment On July 19, 2011, at 3:51 AM, MichaelDSimms wrote:

    You are wrong about #49, plenty of Farmers talk about this. Many of the points made are somewhat valid of course their are always the other sides of each point. Such as #43 unless you were English.

    And #16 of course is the main reason we are running huge deficits.

  • Report this Comment On July 20, 2011, at 9:35 AM, MyDonkey wrote:

    As an antidote to the above article, try this one:

    http://cluborlov.blogspot.com/2010/11/americathe-grim-truth....

  • Report this Comment On July 20, 2011, at 11:57 PM, mcintorb wrote:

    On July 18, 2011, at 7:05 AM, Ellen1920 wrote:

    "16. The average American now retires at age 62. One hundred years ago, the average American died at age 51."

    Who is this average American? And what makes her so average? Do all average Americans retire at 62, or just that one? I think you meant "In America, the average age of retirement is 62".

    Ellen, the avergae American is an hermaphrodite.

  • Report this Comment On July 21, 2011, at 6:43 PM, rgon1969 wrote:

    There is more to life than your portfolio. Even in death, we (a lot of people anyhow) can know peace.

  • Report this Comment On July 22, 2011, at 9:01 AM, BillGoff wrote:

    And if we can survive this clearly socialist, muslim sypathizing,anti free market presidency, there might yet be hope for the future. Two terms of this, and all bets are off.

  • Report this Comment On July 22, 2011, at 9:41 AM, catoismymotor wrote:

    Muslim sympathizing?

    Please understand that I am not a fan of how the Obama Whitehouse does most things. But I have to ask if you are putting placing the collective culture of North Africa, Middle East and Southwestern Asia under the umbrella of *muslim* -or- are you taking a "us verses them" appraoch due to theological differences?

    So much harm has been done politically, physicaly and psycologically since 09/11/01. I don't mind it if he wishes to extend olive branches and mend fences by being culturally sensitive. For example: The way he had OBL burried at sea *may* have been the spoon full of sugar that helped the news of his death go down easier (with lessened blowback).

  • Report this Comment On July 22, 2011, at 1:53 PM, rdwicker wrote:

    Once again you crushed it!

    Look at this response... Well Done!

  • Report this Comment On July 22, 2011, at 2:14 PM, vanstock wrote:

    I am not happy about #49. We spend much less on food because it is all so processed and far worse for us. We traded price for quality.

  • Report this Comment On July 22, 2011, at 2:16 PM, masterN17 wrote:

    Re #49 - Quality of food has drastically decreased as more genetically modified crops with negative long-term health effects are introduced into the supply. Health care costs have eaten into and beyond savings produced by reduction in food cost and quality. Organic and natural food production practices remain at the same relative cost levels as food traditionally has for the past century.

    :(

  • Report this Comment On July 22, 2011, at 2:18 PM, TMFHousel wrote:

    <<Organic and natural food production practices remain at the same relative cost levels as food traditionally has for the past century.>>

    I find that totally implausible and would love to see your evidence.

  • Report this Comment On July 22, 2011, at 2:20 PM, TMFHousel wrote:

    <<We traded price for quality.>>

    More notably, we traded manual labor for a tractor. The decrease in food prices over time has been driven by farm productivity.

  • Report this Comment On July 22, 2011, at 2:25 PM, TMFHousel wrote:

    The CPI's metric for food and vegetable prices has grown half as fast disposable income per capita over the past half century.

    http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/data/A229RC0.txt

    http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/data/CUSR0000SAF113.txt

    Thanks for the comments, everyone.

  • Report this Comment On July 22, 2011, at 2:42 PM, bretco wrote:

    Morgan,

    You should do a similar article at least once a month if not once a week. Thank You !!

  • Report this Comment On October 31, 2012, at 6:33 PM, Melaschasm wrote:

    "For the first time in U.S. history, banks own a greater share of residential housing net worth in the United States than all individual Americans put together."

    This is not even close to being true. Individuals still own much more than 50% of residential housing, and poor people are more likely to rent than wealthy people.

    Plus much of the residential rental market is owned by businesses which are not banks, further reducing bank ownership levels. I am not convinced that bank ownership levels exceed 10%, but if they do, it is not by much.

  • Report this Comment On October 31, 2012, at 6:40 PM, TMFMorgan wrote:

    <<This is not even close to being true. Individuals still own much more than 50% of residential housing>>

    Nope:

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-1H14wLdNCQw/UFs_lQZ4wuI/AAAAAAAART...

  • Report this Comment On October 31, 2012, at 8:23 PM, daliya wrote:

    If Obamma gets in perhaps a little redisribution of wealth would make it ok to live in usa. its not terrible not to be rich. ou have less junk in the house. You have 3 tee shirts instead of 30 and one sofa instead of 3 and one in the garage . An older car insted of 3 new ones anda smaller pot belly if you cut down on eating gout and junk food. food. If we all tighten our belts together there will be enough for all .How about nationizing health care and forgo those nive insurance companies and frg the banks and nationize banks that wold help us all as well.

  • Report this Comment On October 31, 2012, at 8:27 PM, daliya wrote:

    sorry about the miss spelling above.If

    Obamma gets in perhaps a little redisribution of wealth would make it ok to live in usa. Its not terrible not to be rich. You have less junk in the house. You have 3 tee shirts instead of 30 and one sofa instead of 3 and the one in the garage . An older car instead of 3 new ones and a smaller pot belly if you cut down on eating out and junk food. food. If we all tighten our belts together there will be enough for all .How about nationilizing health care and forgoing those nice insurance companies and forgo the banks and nationalize banks that would help us all as well.

    There will still be enough capiitalism to keep the greedy ones happy. They could still build junk houses that wash away on the wind and sell food that makes people sick. Lots of ways for capitalists to expoit the ignorance of people and sell them garbage and make money .

  • Report this Comment On November 02, 2012, at 11:34 PM, jrbrain wrote:

    Some think the U.S. has a 200-year supply of coal. If they're only fractionally right, you and I never have to worry about turning the lights on.

    This sounds like great fortune, unless you live in close proximity to a coal fired plant and have to breathe the fumes and particulates. If you don't live close to one of these plants, I Invite you to observe for your self the impacts of coal fired plants on the atmosphere.

    First drive south from Cortez Colorado towards Shiprock, New Mexico and observe the air pollution from the Four Corners and San Juan Generating stations to the southeast; both are coal fired plants.

    While you are in the vicinity, drive downwind of one of these stations and go for an afternoon hike while you breathing the fumes.

    Then go west to Lees Ferry below Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River just above the Grand Canyon and hike to the east up the Spencer trail to the top of the bluff, look for the sickening green pollution emanating from coal fired Navajo Generation Station.

    The contrast in air quality is stunning if you happen to make these observations on a fall or winter day where the unpolluted atmosphere is so clear you can see mountain ranges more than 100 miles away with no intervening haze. To see the filth emanating from these plants on such days is heart breaking.

    Finally, the next time you are flying across the country note the lack of a brown layer of smog while at cruising elevation across much of the Midwest and the West, then notice a thickening brown layer as you approach any major metropolitan area or the East Coast in general. Every time you fly somewhere, look for this brown layer and see how far out you start to notice this brown layer of pollution. I think it will be a rare flight where you do not see it.

    After making these observations for your self, perhaps you too will ask the question that begs to be answered: How much can we change the atmospheric chemistry with our emissions before we see significant impacts to our climate, ecosystems, human health, and quality of life?

  • Report this Comment On November 06, 2012, at 3:41 PM, kydderr wrote:

    this should have been "updated" for 2012!!!!!!!!!

  • Report this Comment On January 30, 2014, at 8:03 PM, ronjohnson4056 wrote:

    Some of these things I'm supposed to feel good about, aren't making me feel so good. How is the fact that Zuckerberg has made more money than he knows what to do with make me feel good. I work hard every day and I'm still just making enough to get by. -Ron Johnson | http://www.bbgreens.net

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