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First Industrial Realty Trust Inc (NYSE:FR)
Q4 2020 Earnings Call
Feb 11, 2021, 11:00 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good Morning. My name is Shea and I will be the conference operator today. At this time, I would like to welcome everyone to the First Industrial 4Q and Full Year '20 Results Conference Call. [Operator Instructions] Thank you.

At this time, I would like to turn the conference over to Art Harmon. Please go ahead.

Arthur Harmon -- Vice President-Investor Relations and Marketing

Thank you, Shea. Hello everybody and welcome to our call.

Before we discuss our fourth quarter and full year 2020 results as well as 2021 guidance, let me remind everyone that our call may include forward-looking statements as defined by federal securities laws. These statements are based on management's expectations, plans and estimates of our prospects. Today's statements may be time-sensitive and accurate only as of today's date, Thursday, February 11th, 2021. We assume no obligation to update our statements or the other information we provide. Actual results may differ materially from our forward-looking statements and factors which could cause this are described in our 10-K and other SEC filings.

You can find a reconciliation of non-GAAP financial measures discussed in today's call in our supplemental report and our earnings release. The supplemental report, earnings release and our SEC filings are available at firstindustrial.com under the Investors tab.

Our call will begin with remarks by Peter Baccile, our President and Chief Executive Officer; and Scott Musil, our Chief Financial Officer, after which we'll open it up for your questions. Also on the call today are Jojo Yap, our Chief Investment Officer; Peter Schultz, Executive Vice President; Chris Schneider, Senior Vice President of Operations; and Bob Walter, Senior Vice President of Capital Markets and Asset Management.

Now, let me turn the call over to Peter.

Peter E. Baccile -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Art. And thank you all for joining us. We hope you're doing well and staying healthy. 2020 was a year unlike any other and one which we would each like to put in our very distant memory. Notwithstanding the turmoil, fear and uncertain operating environment, the FR team remain focused, executed the plan and performed admirably generating outstanding results for shareholders. Our portfolio performance was strong. We maintained high occupancy levels, grew cash rents and collected over 99% of build rents, more on that in a moment.

We capped off 2020 with an excellent fourth quarter. We delivered year-end occupancy of 95.7%, up 70 basis points from the guidance midpoint provided on our third quarter call. This was driven primarily by leasing at our developments and one of our replacement tenants in Southern California taking occupancy earlier than anticipated.

For the full year, we grew cash rental rates 13.5%, which is the second highest in our company's history, just behind the 13.9% growth we achieved in 2019. These metrics reflect consistently strong tenant demand for high-quality logistics space. In our markets, we're seeing well located and highly functional space being absorbed by e-commerce and other traditional users and their efforts to optimize supply chain. The positive fourth quarter leasing statistics nationally are consistent with our own experience as CBRE's preliminary figure for net absorption is 104 million square feet, the highest quarterly result in the last four years and exceeding the 69 million square feet of 4Q completions. For the full year, net absorption was 224 million square feet, 15% higher than 2019. Completions were 265 million square feet, an increase of 10% over 2019.

In 2021, we expect to capitalize on our current land holdings as well as new acquisitions to generate more growth and value creation. We're also focused on making progress in realizing the three-year cash flow growth opportunity we laid out for you at our Investor Day this past November. I'm pleased to say we're off to a strong start as we've signed leases for approximately 54% of our 2021 rollovers and a cash rental rate increase of approximately 13%. This early performance is consistent with the 10% to 14% increase we expect on our new and renewal leasing for the full year 2021. Our expirations for the balance of 2021 are fairly granular with our largest remaining rollover now a 400,000 square footer where the tenant is expected to vacate in May.

I'd like to highlight several big leasing wins and some of our developments. As evidence of the strength of the South Florida market, we're pleased to announce we have signed a long-term lease for 100% of the three-building First Cypress Creek Commerce Center with a single e-commerce tenant. This project totals 377,000 square feet and the lease commenced right at completion on February 1st. Our total investment is $37.1 million and our first year stabilized cash yield is 6.6%.

In the Inland Empire at our First Redwood project, we signed and commenced leases for both the 358,000 and the 72,000 square foot facilities in the fourth quarter. And just this week, we fully leased the remaining 44,000 square foot building. Given our own experience and the strong market dynamics reflected in CBRE's fourth quarter update report, which shows the Inland Empire vacancy rate at 1.9%. We're excited to be readying our next start in that market, which I will discuss shortly.

Also in the fourth quarter in Dallas, we signed two leases at First Park 121 to bring a pair of buildings there to 100% occupancy. The first was for the remaining 101,000 square feet at the 434,000 square foot Building E and the second was a 25,000 square foot expansion at Building B. Each of these leases is a reflection of the continued strong demand for high-quality logistics space and the effort and talent of our leasing teams across the country.

Turning to new development starts. We've broken ground PV 303 Building C in Phoenix on our wholly owned site. This 548,000 square foot cross-dock facility is our fourth speculative development in this highly sought after size range since 2017. Each of our prior projects in this market was fully leased at or near completion. Total investment for this new development is approximately $42.6 million with a targeted cash yield of 6.6%.

Turning now to the new project in the Inland Empire I referenced. We are planning to break ground in the coming weeks on First Wilson I, a 303,000 square foot facility in the I-215 corridor of the Inland Empire. This is a $30.2 million development with a targeted completion at the end of December and a projected cash yield of 6.3%.

Lastly, we will be starting a 500,000 square foot development in Nashville known as First Rockdale IV. The site is located within a park where we have successfully developed buildings over the years. Tennessee was among the fastest growing states in the US during 2020 and Nashville is its largest city. We've seen increased absorption and leasing activity for large distribution centers in this sub-market and are excited about this opportunity. Total investment is approximately $26.8 million with a targeted cash yield of 7.2%.

Summing up our development activity in 2020, we placed in service 10 buildings totaling 2.5 million square feet with an estimated investment of $222 million. These assets are 79% leased at an estimated cash yield of 7.2% upon full lease up. This represents an expected overall margin of 58% to 68%, which is about a $1 per share of NAV.

One additional item of note regarding our highly successful JV in Phoenix. As we discussed on our third quarter call, we successfully leased the 644,000 square foot spec building at PV 303 to a single tenant. Upon completion in the fourth quarter, we negotiated the acquisition of our partners' interest in the building, reflecting a total purchase price of $42.6 million, which is net of our $5.2 million share of the joint venture's gain on sale and incentive fee.

Moving now to dispositions. During the quarter, we sold 15 properties for $97.1 million at an in-place cap rate of approximately 6.4%. In 2020, excluding the previously reported purchase option related sale in Phoenix, we sold 1.9 million square feet for a total of $153.4 million, essentially at the midpoint of our target sales guidance range for the year. For 2021, our guidance for sales is $100 million to $150 million.

In the coming weeks, we anticipate selling a 664,000 square foot building in Houston at a sales price of approximately $42 million. Given its very high probability of closing, we are including the impact of this sale in 2021 guidance. Aside from the first quarter sale I just mentioned, we expect the majority of the remaining 2021 sales to be back-end loaded. Based upon our strong 2020 performance and 2021 outlook, which Scott will discuss shortly, our Board of Directors has declared a dividend of $0.27 per share for the first quarter of 2021. This is a $1.08 per share annualized, which equates to an 8% increase from 2020. This dividend level represents a payout ratio of approximately 69% of our anticipated AFFO for 2021 as defined in our supplemental.

To wrap it up, we had an excellent quarter to end the year on a high note. We're very excited about the strength of our platform and our future development pipeline, both of which position us well to benefit from continued strong fundamentals in the industrial market and to take advantage of the growth opportunities that are to come in 2021.

With that, let me turn it over to Scott.

Scott Musil -- Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Peter. Let me recap our results. NAREIT funds from operations were $0.44 per fully diluted share compared to $0.45 per share in 4Q 2019. For the full year, NAREIT FFO per share was $1.84 versus $1.74 in 2019. I remind you that our full year 2020 includes income related to the final settlement of two insurance claims for damaged properties recognized in prior quarters. This was partially offset by a restructuring charge in costs related to the accelerated vesting of equity awards for retirement eligible employees. Excluding the impact of approximately $0.04 per share related to these items, 2020 FFO per share was $1.80.

Now a quick update on our collection experience. We have collected 99% of the 2020 monthly rental billings every month since April. And effectively it would be 100% if we factored in reserves. We are also pleased to announce all tenants with deferral agreements and paid back those obligations in full and we currently have no other agreements outstanding.

In another bit of good news, we have closure on one of our last tenants on the watchlist that we discussed in our last call. This tenant occupied a 137,000 square foot building in the Chino submarket of the Inland Empire West and vacated on December 31st. Due to the great work of our Southern California team, we were able to lease 100% of the building on a long-term basis with only one month of downtime at a cash rental rate increase of 28%. In the fourth quarter, we also wrote off the $1.1 million of cash in straight-line rent receivable related to this tenant. In doing so, we have taken care of the last material accounts receivable exposure related to our COVID-related watchlist.

Summarizing our outstanding leasing volume during the quarter, we commenced approximately 4.4 million square feet of leases. Of these, 700,000 square feet were new, 1.6 million square feet were renewals and 2.1 million square feet were for developments and acquisitions with lease up. Tenant retention by square footage was 80.6%. For the quarter, same-store NOI growth on a cash basis, excluding termination fees, was 1.3% helped by an increase in rental rates on new and renewal leasing and rental rate bumps embedded in our leases, partially offset by lower average occupancy and an increase in free rent.

For the full year 2020, cash same-store NOI growth before lease termination fees was 4.4%. Cash rental rates for the quarter were up 10.4% overall with renewals up 8.6% and new leasing 12.8%. On a straight-line basis, overall rental rates were up 25.5% with renewals increasing 25.9% and new leasing up 25.1%. For the year, cash rental rates were up 13.5%, which as Peter mentioned is the second highest in the company's history. On a straight-line basis, they were up 29.7%.

Now on to a few balance sheet metrics. At December 31st, our net debt plus preferred stock to adjusted EBITDA is 4.8 times and the weighted average maturity of our unsecured notes, term loans and secured financings was 6.3 years with a weighted average interest rate at 3.7%.

Moving on to our 2021 initial guidance per our earnings release last evening. Our guidance range for NAREIT FFO is $1.85 to $1.95 per share with a midpoint of $1.90. Key assumptions for guidance are as follows; quarter end average in-service occupancy for the year of 95.5% to 96.5%; our cash bad debt expense assumption for 2021 is $2 million, consistent with last year's pre-pandemic assumption. Same-store NOI growth on a cash basis before termination fees of 3% to 4%. We expect our G&A expense to approximate $33 million to $34 million. Guidance includes the anticipated 2021 costs related to our completed and under-construction developments at December 31st, plus the expected first quarter groundbreakings of First Park PV 303 Building C, First Rockdale IV and First Wilson I.

In total, for the full year 2021, we expect to capitalize about $0.05 per share of interest related to these developments. Guidance reflects the impact from the $42 million sale in Houston, expected to close in the first quarter that Peter discussed, which could be as much as $0.02 per share of FFO impact in 2021 depending on redeployment of the anticipated proceeds. The guidance also reflects the expected pay off of $58 million of secured debt in the third quarter with an interest rate of 4.85%.

Other than previously discussed, our guidance does not reflect the impact of any other future sales, acquisitions or new development starts, the impact of any future debt issuances, debt repurchases or repayments and guidance also excludes the potential issuance of equity.

Let me turn it back over to Peter.

Peter E. Baccile -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Scott. Before we open it up to questions, let me congratulate our team for their outstanding performance in 2020. It was the kind of year that is impossible to prepare for. There is no training for how to manage the business through a pandemic, especially one accompanied by social and political unrest not seen in decades. The true leaders emerged during a crisis and when they have managed well and the crisis has passed, to most it may not have felt like a crisis at all. This is what we experienced within our company across every role in every region. So thank you team FR for your commitment and dedication. I couldn't be more proud to work with such a talented group of people nor more excited about the opportunities ahead.

With that, we will now move to the question-and-answer portion of our call. We ask that you please limit your questions to one plus a follow-up and then you're welcome to get back in the queue. So, operator, please open it up for questions.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

Thank you, sir. [Operator Instructions] The first question will come from Craig Mailman with KeyBanc Capital Markets. Please go ahead.

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Hey. Good morning, guys. Nice job on the development leasing in 4Q and to-date. And I'm just kind of curious as you guys derisked the pipeline here. I know you don't necessarily put numbers on starts, but as you're looking at the land bank and demand across your markets, what do you think a decent bogie could be on where you could be from a development start level this year?

Peter E. Baccile -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Hey, Craig, it's Peter. I'll -- as you pointed out, we don't give guidance on starts. But as you know, we can, with the land that we own, build about 13 million square feet. We can build a lot more also on our JV land. And there is no reason that you should think that our development volumes won't go back to pre-pandemic levels. Obviously last year we had a downtime of about six months where we suspended new starts, we got delayed on another project located in Philadelphia. So we're excited about the markets right now. There is a lot of demand, it's broad-based. We also think that 2021, you're going to see a lot more capital expenditure into the business environment and we are very pro -- we're very positive on 2021 outlook.

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Okay. That's helpful. And just, Scott, from a capital perspective, just with the cadence of potential spend here in the development pipeline and disposition proceeds coming in, I mean, do you guys feel good about where you are? I know you have no equity in the plan, but would you prefer to kind of use debt here in the near-term to bridge any gap or would you guys, with where the stock is trading, could equity be ultimately in the plan?

Scott Musil -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, Craig, it's Scott. Equity could be in the plan, but we're sitting on about $135 million of cash as we stand today. Our line of credit is undrawn, so we have a full $725 million and our leverage is at about 4.8 times. So we're in pretty good shape. But as you know, we've had issued equity in past if we see future investments that we really like and we like the stock price, equity is on the table for something like that. And if you looked at the equity we've issued probably since 2015, which was more for growth spec development, we're really happy about the development margins we earned on those investments. So, even though we look in good shape as we stand today, equity is a possibility, it just depends on what our investment growth is.

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Okay. And can I slip one more in there? Just on the loans you have come in due this year, kind of what's timing expected on potentially the $200 million kind of what would the plan be from a refinancing?

Scott Musil -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. The $200 million was a term loan that we refinanced last July during the pandemic. The spread popped up to 150 basis points that comes due this July. The bank market has gotten a lot better since then. We probably could shave off about 50 basis points in total spread on that. So we are looking at the bank market to refinance that. And Craig, we also have our line of credit coming due in October of this year. And if we did something with the term loan, we would package them together. On the $58 million of secured debt that we can pay off in July, we'll probably use excess cash for line of credit borrowings to pay that off.

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Great. Thanks.

Operator

The next question will come from Rob Stevenson with Janney. Please go ahead.

Rob Stevenson -- Janney Montgomery Scott -- Analyst

Hi. Good morning, guys. Can you talk a little bit about, to any extent, the issue surrounding the shipping container capacity issues have impacted your tenants and/or the demand for increased expansion space in port markets like Southern Cal?

Johannson Yap -- Chief Investment Officer

Sure. Hi, this is Jojo. Yes, there is congestion in the Port of LA, Port of Long Beach, a lot of it has to do with the amount of goods coming into the port, but also because of the efficiencies in the port right now, given labor issues and then COVID-related process. I would put that as number one because of the COVID practice that's been extending, slowing down the throughput from the container. Now, the actual amount that has come into the port has increased year-over-year, but not meaningful enough to really significantly affect the market. The market in itself is already good, positive absorption in SoCal and the marginal impact with that year-over-year, if you look at the port container throughput, it is about 5% now.

It lagged first in the year, in the second quarter it was negative, but then the second half of the year it caught up as much as 15% to 20%. So, net-net, year-over-year were about 5% up. So overall, our view is that when COVID reduces, I think the flow will come in quicker and it will be back to normal with slightly more than inflationary adjusted growth year-over-year in terms of container volume.

Rob Stevenson -- Janney Montgomery Scott -- Analyst

And how is that impacting your desire to develop in the Inland Empire land parcels, etc, in the near-term?

Johannson Yap -- Chief Investment Officer

Sure. It has actually increased because of what's happening now is that the take-up that the tenants want is actually increasing, because they cannot accurately estimate the amount of goods they're getting because of delay. They're actually ordering more. So rather than just-in-time inventory, it's really a severe case just in case. So that's why, actually in the last six months, spaces has been leasing a little bit quicker because of that just in case mentality of the tenants. They don't want to lose that sale and they're stocking up more.

Rob Stevenson -- Janney Montgomery Scott -- Analyst

Okay. And then, the other one for me is, how significant is the land purchase machine today for you guys? I mean, you guys did a decent job at increasing your usable land position year-over-year and over the last couple of years, assuming it's getting harder and harder to find developable land at prices that make sense for you guys, but how is that process going and what that pipeline look like for you guys?

Johannson Yap -- Chief Investment Officer

Yeah. The pipelines are actually pretty robust. We're making a great many unsolicited offers on a weekly basis across the country in the higher barrier markets, which is where we're focusing our new investments. It's definitely getting more difficult. Land values, as you know, have gone up significantly and continue to rise. The good news is, in those markets where land is appreciating, the most rapidly, the rents are growing the quickest as well. So, it justifies the timetable for getting entitlements is not shortening for sure. So basically what that means is. we got to have a lot more balls in the air to keep that volume going because we're going to win a lower percentage of those opportunities. But right now the team is doing a great job fielding a lot of new opportunities.

Rob Stevenson -- Janney Montgomery Scott -- Analyst

Okay. Thanks, guys. Appreciate it.

Operator

The next question will come from Dave Rodgers with Baird. Please go ahead.

Dave Rodgers -- Baird -- Analyst

Yeah. Good morning, guys. Something in the press release, I think it was based in the same-store NOI comment for the fourth quarter, talked about higher free rent. So, I guess, maybe just expand upon the leasing economics that you were seeing, that drove that comment and maybe whether you're seeing any of that in the development pipeline in driving some of this activity?

Christopher Schneider -- Senior Vice President, Operations and Chief Information Officer

Yeah, Dave, this is Chris. In general, on the lease free rent concessions, we're not seeing really any changes there. We're still usually giving about half a month free rent for year term in the lease. So, the changes in the free rent from quarter-to-quarter have to do just really with the free rent burning off on some deals, development deals, but as far as overall concessions, we're not seeing much change in that.

Dave Rodgers -- Baird -- Analyst

Okay, fair enough. On those development deals, how much of that or when did those all commence? I mean, did those all commence essentially with signing or do you have some delayed starts on that activity?

Christopher Schneider -- Senior Vice President, Operations and Chief Information Officer

Which development? Are you -- Dave, are you asking the $100 million that we've announced?

Dave Rodgers -- Baird -- Analyst

Yeah, yeah. The 1.2 million square feet or so that you said in the press release last night, most of which I think was fourth quarter signings. I guess I was just kind of make sure that those were signings for where the immediate starts or how does that stagger?

Christopher Schneider -- Senior Vice President, Operations and Chief Information Officer

Yes. Yeah, they're immediate starts because there is not a significant amount [Indecipherable] and some of them were taken as is.

Dave Rodgers -- Baird -- Analyst

Okay.

Christopher Schneider -- Senior Vice President, Operations and Chief Information Officer

So, I'd say, most of them were in 2020 First Cypress Creek Commerce Center that's February of this year.

Dave Rodgers -- Baird -- Analyst

Okay. Thanks for that. Scott, since you look up on the bad debt side, I think you gave guidance and maybe was part of the same-store of $2 million for bad debt, which was I think consistent with the expectation for '20 or what you delivered in '20. But why did you not expect that number to come down? Is that just kind of an overly cautious number or is there something more specific in that?

Scott Musil -- Chief Financial Officer

Nothing more specific. Our assumption on bad debt, Dave, is basically we look at the 26-year history of the company, which is about 50 basis points of total revenues and that's how we get the $2 million. Last year, we incurred about $1.8 million of cash bad debt expense. So, we're hoping we can beat that $2 million number that's in our guidance.

Dave Rodgers -- Baird -- Analyst

That's helpful. Lastly, are you guys seeing more short-term lease activity? I heard a little bit about that early in the earnings season, but kind of what your experience has been with that? Yeah. Dave, this is Chris again. Not really. If you look at what was in place at 12/31 between our month-to-month tenants and our short-term tenants, it's about 200,000 square feet, so pretty low. Okay, great. Thank you.

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Your next response will come from Ki Bin Kim with Truist. Please go ahead.

Ki Bin Kim -- Truist -- Analyst

Thanks and good afternoon, everyone. Can you just talk about how some of your conversations with your tenants have evolved over time and what are their biggest pain points today and things being asked for?

Peter E. Baccile -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Kim, it's Peter, I couldn't hear the last part of your questions.

Ki Bin Kim -- Truist -- Analyst

So, your biggest pain points and things that they are asking for today, if that's changed at all over the past couple of quarters?

Peter E. Baccile -- President and Chief Executive Officer

I wouldn't say substantially. We continue to see an increased level of confidence from our tenants. A lot of the deals that we're seeing continued to be expansions. And as Jojo remarked a couple of minutes ago, the shift from just in time to just in case in terms of inventory, we're seeing lease terms lengthen as you saw in some of our information in the subs. So I would say, in general, it continues to be positive. Jojo?

Johannson Yap -- Chief Investment Officer

Not much change. Again, over -- it's been happening already, Ki Bin, for a year or two. The food-related companies are more active, medical related are more active, the home related also are more active, the 3PLs in e-commerce has always been active. So, I guess, if there is a change, it's a little bit more of a broader type. More industries are actually coming into because of the change to the supply chain. But in terms of their ask, in terms of leasing and functionality buildings, no change.

Ki Bin Kim -- Truist -- Analyst

Got it. And can you just talk about the R&D flex segment of your business. There is a little bit of an occupancy decline, I'm not sure if that's just transitory and some of the pockets of vacancy, there is not much thankfully, but, look, some pockets of vacancy like in markets like Seattle or Baltimore?

Christopher Schneider -- Senior Vice President, Operations and Chief Information Officer

Ki Bin, I'll take the first part, this is Chris. The R&D flex is pretty -- small part of our portfolio. I think it's about 2% to net rents. The one -- the drop in occupancy is really just one space. So obviously we're marketing that space, but that's really where that's from.

Ki Bin Kim -- Truist -- Analyst

Ki Bin, it's Peter. Relative to Baltimore, the occupancy level there is really a function of our vacancy at the former Pier 1 space, leasing that space will take occupancy in that market to 98.4% and we're seeing some activity on that space now, but nothing to report. And then, Jojo can touch on Seattle?

Johannson Yap -- Chief Investment Officer

Well, Seattle, currently there is only one space about 64,000 square feet and our portfolio is slightly over 4,000. So it's really only one vacancy and it's kind of skews the numbers in terms of occupancy. It's a good space. We just haven't found the right tenant for it yet.

Ki Bin Kim -- Truist -- Analyst

Got it. Thank you, guys.

Operator

The next question will come from Michael Carroll with RBC Capital Markets. Please go ahead.

Michael Carroll -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

Yeah, thanks. I guess, Peter, in your comments, I think you make a comment that there is a large lease expiration in May of about 400,000 square feet where you expect the tenant will move out. Can you provide some details on that, maybe what their current rental rate is and where that asset is located?

Peter E. Baccile -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Jojo, you want to take that?

Johannson Yap -- Chief Investment Officer

Yeah. So it's in Kansas city, very good quality property. The tenant has basically told us that they will leave and property is again good comparable to competition, but in terms of income, we've factored our downtime of 12 months, so it doesn't affect the numbers for this year.

Michael Carroll -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

Okay. Then where is rents on that asset relative to market?

Johannson Yap -- Chief Investment Officer

That we don't disclose for competitive reasons. We will report to you what happens there when we lease it.

Michael Carroll -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

Okay, great. And then, I guess, last question, I know that last call they were two challenged tenants that were highlighted. And I believe that you announced the resolution to one of those. Did I miss the resolution to the second tenant, I guess, what was going on there?

Scott Musil -- Chief Financial Officer

Hey, Mike. It's Scott. Yeah, the one tenant is, I think 45,000 square feet in the South Bay market is Southern California, that tenant is paid up in current at this point in time. So we're in good shape.

Michael Carroll -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

Okay, great. Thanks, Scott.

Operator

The next question will come from Vince Tibone with Green Street. Please go ahead.

Vince Tibone -- Green Street -- Analyst

Hi. Good morning. As you think about potential dispositions for the year, could you see an opportunity for a portfolio deal or the way to accelerate your target market mix, given the desire many institutions to increase their industrial exposure and scale?

Peter E. Baccile -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Hey, Vince. Yeah, we've looked at that. And what you -- what we've seen in the marketplace is, we're able to maximize value by selling literally one-off assets. The buyers of these assets tend to be about 30% go to users. And as you know, users or a little less price sensitive, so we are able to maximize value there. Another group of buyers would be the 1031 buyers who are also more focused on time then may be paying that extra buck a foot. So we like those buyers.

They're also being acquired by local and semi-regional money managers and high net worth families. And given that that buyer group is really focused on the smaller transaction, they're not really going to be interested in a few hundred million dollar portfolio. And they're really the ones that are going to pay the highest values than what we've experienced so far. So that's why we really haven't gone out with the portfolios.

Vince Tibone -- Green Street -- Analyst

Makes sense. Now, thank you for that. And one more from me. In 2020, I'm curious, how much did leasing spread and market rent growth differ between bulk, light industrial and flex properties in your portfolio?

Christopher Schneider -- Senior Vice President, Operations and Chief Information Officer

Yeah, this is Chris. If you look at across [Phonetic], it's pretty broad-based across all the different types. I would say that actually R&D flex was a little bit higher as far as the spreads, but it was pretty broad based across all the property types.

Vince Tibone -- Green Street -- Analyst

Okay. Thank you.

Operator

The next question will come from Caitlin Burrows with Goldman Sachs. Please go ahead.

Caitlin Burrows -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Hi. Good morning. Tenant retention on renewals was about 81% in the fourth quarter, which is similar to the full year level. So I was wondering if you could just talk about how you think about what's the right level is? And then also when tenants choose not to renew what are some of the reasons, does it come down to rents or is it just expanding or decreasing the amount of space that they need?

Peter E. Baccile -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Hey, Caitlin. Well, typically when we have a tenant that doesn't renew, it's because they need additional space. And given our high occupancy levels, we don't have any more space to give them. So, clearly it's in our interest to retain tenants, it costs about 4 times as much to release the space as it does to roll the space. And obviously that factors into our desire to push rents as much as we can.

I would say this, in a really good market like we have now, retention is almost more of an outcome than a target. Obviously in a very weak market, you want to retain and so retention is more of your target than you want that to happen, you want that to be the outcome. So, we're really working all the spaces as vigorously as we can to maximize value. And that's a combination of a lot of factors, as I've said, including rent growth and the cost to release.

Caitlin Burrows -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Got it. And then, maybe on the dividend, as you guys talked about how you raised that 8% in the quarter, which is higher than both the FFO growth in 2020 and the guidance for 2021, and I know that you've also talked about, there were some acceleration of capex in 2020, so pull forward some expected spends. So, I guess, what drove the decision to increase the payout ratio rather than retain more cash to reinvest?

Scott Musil -- Chief Financial Officer

Hey, Caitlin, it's Scott. We grew the dividend by 8% as we said in the press release. We grow our dividend as we grow our cash flow. As we laid out at the Investor Day in November, we think we have an opportunity to grow cash flow of 9% a year for the next three years. So that's in line with that. As far as the payout ratio was concerned, it went up a couple of percentage points, so nothing material. And we're still in the 60% level, which we're very happy with.

Caitlin Burrows -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Okay. Thanks.

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Your next response is from Mike Mueller with JPMorgan. Please go ahead.

Mike Mueller -- JPMorgan -- Analyst

Thanks. How does the 54% of the 2021 leases that you've addressed compare to the progress that you had last year?

Christopher Schneider -- Senior Vice President, Operations and Chief Information Officer

Yeah, this is Chris. Actually last year, I think you're right about 59%. Historically, last two or three years, we've been right around that 50% to 60% as far as once taken over by the earnings call. So pretty consistent.

Mike Mueller -- JPMorgan -- Analyst

Got it. Okay. And then, looking at the developments that were placed into service, there were a couple of assets in Texas that had fairly low leasing levels, was just curious in terms of -- can you give us some color on progress there?

Johannson Yap -- Chief Investment Officer

Sure. Hi, this is Jojo. Let's start with Dallas First Park 121. So we built three buildings there. We almost pre-leased the largest building and then we completely leased the second building, so we're left with one. Rough occupancy of the park is about 70s -- a little bit over 70% and so that's a multi-tenant building. We're getting inquiries that's in the Northwest part of Dallas, one of the best pieces of real estate there in terms of that size range. So we're going to increase and we're pretty optimistic we can lease the rest. But overall, we're very pleased with the performance of the park.

Now, moving on to Houston, that's Grand Parkway, now that's been a slower project. In Houston -- last year, Houston had very good absorption of about 11 -- net absorption of 11 million square feet, but it also had about 16 plus million of new deliveries. If you look at Houston, the most delivered part or market -- submarket with the most supply was the north part, and Northwest was second. Now our project is in Katy, is part of the Northwest submarket, a little bit west. So there is a little bit more space there that tenants can choose from. So, we're competing with some space. But again, that project has freeway frontage, just off State Highway 99, really nice project. So over time will lease it slowly but surely.

Mike Mueller -- JPMorgan -- Analyst

Got it. Okay, thank you.

Operator

The next question is from Sumit Sharma with Scotiabank. Please go ahead.

Sumit Sharma -- Scotiabank -- Analyst

Hey. Good morning, guys. Great quarter. I had a follow-up actually on a bad debt question that was asked a few minutes ago. I think Rob had asked this around the level of bad debts. I think you calculated it to around 40 basis points or 45 basis points based on 2020 revs. And I'm wondering -- and I understand the point -- your point about the 26-year average, but I'm trying to understand whether your higher end or lower end contemplate different levels of bad debt or is it consistent across both the SS NOI ranges?

Scott Musil -- Chief Financial Officer

I'm sorry. Could you repeat the last half of that, Sumit? I didn't get that -- you kind of broke up a little bit.

Sumit Sharma -- Scotiabank -- Analyst

I'm so sorry. What I was asking was, the bad debt is -- is that the same level that's contemplated in both your higher and lower end of the ranges? So, does that 45 -- 40 to 50 basis points of bad debt, does that change between go up to like 30 basis points or is it just consistent across your SS NOI range?

Scott Musil -- Chief Financial Officer

That will impact the same-store NOI range. So to the extent that our bad debt expense comes in lower, and I'll give it as an example, if you look from 2015 to 2019, our bad debt expense on average was $500,000 a year, that was pre-pandemic. So, if we were able to achieve that same level of bad debt expense in 2021, we would pick up another 50 basis points on our same-store, all other things being equal. So that would increase our midpoint from 3.5% up to 4%. I think that's what you were asking.

Sumit Sharma -- Scotiabank -- Analyst

Got it. Yeah, that's what I was asking. I was wondering whether the 4% range includes that -- implicitly calls out that assumption or not. And I think the bottom line bias was that -- does that 4% become 4.5% because of the bad debt or is that already reflected in your assumption? I think you addressed that.

Scott Musil -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. If we do better than the $2 million, we should do better than the midpoint of our same-store guidance all things being equal, correct.

Sumit Sharma -- Scotiabank -- Analyst

Got it. Thank you so much. I appreciate the response to the one key question I know. Let me ask you something more fun. One of your peers has mentioned that they're able to drive rent growth 100 to 200 basis points in markets -- above the market, in some markets where we have density, which is defined as 20 or more assets in a 5-mile radius. I'm not saying this, they said this.

So, I thought if he was asking you, given your density, I think you guys are pretty concentrated in the Riverside sub-market in the Inland Empire and then in the Southwest or Arlington area in Dallas, those are the two spots of my work had sort of showed me. So just trying to understand whether you've seen the ability to push rents higher than the market in areas of high density of your own assets?

Peter E. Baccile -- President and Chief Executive Officer

I'll start out with this and then pass it over to Jojo for his thoughts. But first of all, remember there is 17 billion or so square feet of industrial in the United States. If you look at each sponsor, owner, entity owns, nobody owns an overwhelming percentage of that. So it's not like the major mall business where if you own the two best malls in each town, you can effectively dictate the tenants. Our markets aren't really like that. So, we think that the overall demand is so strong, whether it's from e-commerce or more traditional users that we're going to be able to continue to grow rents at a very high rate and it's the offering too that matters significantly, the functionality, the quality of the functionality of the asset, the location of the asset, more so than who might own how many assets within a 5-mile or 10-mile radius. Jojo?

Johannson Yap -- Chief Investment Officer

Yeah. Not much more to add to what Peter said, except that we as -- that's why as a company, we focus, we prioritize more infill product because when you have more in-built properties, you have less supply, and then you can raise rents higher than the average market, if you may, in certain markets. And I can confirm, Sumit, that the Arlington, we just -- in general, it's a great Southwest market, it's a good market and we like Arlington. In fact we have product in Arlington. And the reason we invested there too is because it's quite infill and we feel that the overall in Arlington -- maybe this is your question that you can raise rents higher than if you are in South Dallas. And the reason is South Dallas is not infill and you get more product there, so confirming your thesis.

Sumit Sharma -- Scotiabank -- Analyst

Well, it's not the thesis, it's the hypothesis, but thanks for that data. I think it's more -- I think your points about market control and not being like malls is actually more -- adds more clarity to it, but your infill point I get and I appreciate. I guess, one last one really quick, contractual escalators and new leases, what are they averaging at and are you seeing any creep above the 3% range?

Christopher Schneider -- Senior Vice President, Operations and Chief Information Officer

Yeah. Overall -- this is Chris. Our overall portfolio is about 2.8%, that's on an annualized basis. And that's about 98% of all of our long-term leases. Certainly some of the actual increases we're seeing 3%-plus, we are seeing that. Peter and Jojo can comment a little bit more with what they're seeing here.

Johannson Yap -- Chief Investment Officer

Yeah, we're you're seeing the opportunity to push those rental increases on leases that are generally in the three-year plus or minus range whereas five or seven or 10, three is probably the upper limit.

Sumit Sharma -- Scotiabank -- Analyst

Alright. Thank you, gentlemen, for indulging me.

Peter E. Baccile -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

The next question is from Jay Kornreich with SMBC. Please go ahead.

Jay Kornreich -- SMBC -- Analyst

Hi. Thanks for taking the question. I guess, as you guys consider the risk that major cities may take a long time to return to pre-pandemic levels, does this inform you from a geographic perspective to consider future investments more in Sunbelt and less gateway markets?

Peter E. Baccile -- President and Chief Executive Officer

We certainly track movement of people, that's one of the reasons we're very intrigued by Nashville right now and Tennessee being sixth fastest growing state in the country. When you look around and see how certain municipalities are being managed, we pay attention to that. That will matter over the long-term. And people talk about California losing population. I think you have to remember that not only do people move up, but they move in. So looking at the net numbers, you'd find that the population reduction isn't huge relative to their nearly 40 million person population. So, really what we're focused on is consumption zones and movements that might change or alter or move those consumption zones. And you're really not seeing any big trends that would cause us to shift our focus away from the markets that we're focused on today.

Jay Kornreich -- SMBC -- Analyst

Okay. I appreciate that. That's it from me.

Operator

The next question is a follow-up from Ki Bin Kim with Truist. Please go ahead.

Ki Bin Kim -- Truist -- Analyst

Thanks. Just going back to the balance sheet. I think I missed some of the color you gave, Scott. But what would the kind of all-in rate and duration be for the debt you're looking to raise this year?

Scott Musil -- Chief Financial Officer

So we go over the expirations. We have a $200 million term loan that comes due in July. We have an option to extend it, but the spread on that loan is pretty high, it's 150 basis points because we entered into that loan during COVID. We think in today's market, we can refinance it 50 basis points inside of that rate, so 50 bps inside of that $200 million. And then the line of credit, we currently pay 110 basis points on that. We think we can knock another 10 bps off the line of credit. So those are basically the two expirations we have this year. And then, again, we've got the $58 million mortgage loan we're paying off, but we've got plenty of excess cash, we have line of credit, we can use to pay that off and that's at a rate of 4.85%.

Ki Bin Kim -- Truist -- Analyst

Okay, got it. Now, is there something that that investors are looking for or asking for you guys to perhaps move into a different bracket of credit spreads, whether that be issuing more unsecured bonds or, I mean, you've already grown your portfolio over time, so I'm not sure it sizes a factor or not, but is there a thing that you can do or that investors are asking for that can maybe help you save it on interest cost going forward?

Scott Musil -- Chief Financial Officer

So, Ki Bin, I would say a couple of things. One is, if we get a rating upgrade to BBB plus or BAA1, that definitely impacts our spread. Our credit statistics off the chart is good. I think when you read the rating agency reports, they want to see a larger scale size of the company. They don't give us exactly what that number is, but it's probably over $1 billion or more of growth in the total value of the company. So that would definitely help.

I would say, from a public -- unsecured bond issuance point of view, we've historically been private placement issuers because the spreads in that market were inside the public market, that flip-flop in the middle of this year in July. So we think we can get even more competitive spreads in the bond market than we were able to get in the private placement market. So all things being equal, we did a bond deal today that spread would definitely be inside of what we executed back earlier in 2020.

Ki Bin Kim -- Truist -- Analyst

And is the debt refinancing cost savings in your 2021 guidance?

Scott Musil -- Chief Financial Officer

Look, the term loan one is not, so that assumes, it's 150 basis points for the rest of the year. So we do -- let's just give a hypothetical, if we're able to renew that on July 1st, that would save us about $0.5 million for that half of the year. And on an annualized basis, that would be a $1 million. So the pay-off of the mortgage debt is $58 million. We're getting six months of the benefit of interest savings there. I'd like to pivot back to the Investor Day where we said we'd get $7 million of savings from refinancing higher cost debt in the next couple of years, we're not seeing that's going to come more in 2020 -- after 2021, so we're really not seeing a lot of that $7 million savings flowing through 2021.

Ki Bin Kim -- Truist -- Analyst

Okay. Thank you.

Operator

And at this time, there are no further questions. I would like to turn the conference over to Peter Baccile for any closing comments.

Peter E. Baccile -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, operator. And thanks to everyone for participating on the call today. As always, feel free to reach out to me, Scott or Art with any follow-up questions. We look forward to connecting with many of you virtually and hopefully in person in 2021. Thank you and have a great day.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Duration: 55 minutes

Call participants:

Arthur Harmon -- Vice President-Investor Relations and Marketing

Peter E. Baccile -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Scott Musil -- Chief Financial Officer

Johannson Yap -- Chief Investment Officer

Christopher Schneider -- Senior Vice President, Operations and Chief Information Officer

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Rob Stevenson -- Janney Montgomery Scott -- Analyst

Dave Rodgers -- Baird -- Analyst

Ki Bin Kim -- Truist -- Analyst

Michael Carroll -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

Vince Tibone -- Green Street -- Analyst

Caitlin Burrows -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Mike Mueller -- JPMorgan -- Analyst

Sumit Sharma -- Scotiabank -- Analyst

Jay Kornreich -- SMBC -- Analyst

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