You've seen lots of advice on how to get through the panic. But if you rely on a full-service broker to guide you, are you happy with the advice you're paying for?

Changes on Wall Street have done more than attack the underpinnings of the financial system. They've also destroyed the confidence of millions of investors. When you know that brokers at firms like Morgan Stanley (NYSE:MS), Merrill Lynch (NYSE:MER), and Goldman Sachs (NYSE:GS) are worrying about their own life savings, you might wonder how much attention they have left to think about your investments.

Going after business
For a long time, discount brokers like Charles Schwab (NASDAQ:SCHW) and TD AMERITRADE (NASDAQ:AMTD) have sought out investors looking for cheaper alternatives to full-service brokers. With tools to help you do your own research, discount brokers can save you commissions and help you learn more about investing.

Now, with stocks sinking nearly every day, even some long-time full-service brokerage customers have finally had it. With newcomers like Interactive Brokers (NASDAQ:IBKR) arguing that they're in better financial shape than some of their Wall Street competitors, discounters have one more way to draw customers.

Whether you use a full-service or discount broker, we're curious about your experience during these tough times. Are you satisfied with the service you're getting, or are you looking for a change? Please take a moment to answer our Fool poll below, and feel free to share your experiences in the comment section below.

What now? The Motley Fool is here to answer your questions about this financial crisis. Send us an email at AsktheFool@fool.com, and check back at Fool.com as we answer your questions and cover the latest on the Panic of 2008.

Fool contributor Dan Caplinger has had some trade glitches with his discount brokers, but on the whole, he's satisfied. He doesn't own shares of the companies mentioned in this article. Charles Schwab is a Motley Fool Stock Advisor recommendation. Try any of our Foolish newsletters today, free for 30 days. The Fool's disclosure policy won't panic on you.