Stocks climbing to 10 times their original price are rare breeds -- but they're not impossible to find. Especially when you have Fools for friends.

The market's best stocks include companies that have risen dozens of times in value by taking advantage of the market's weaknesses. These aren't penny stocks; they're viable companies with sound business prospects, achieving phenomenal returns. Finding just one or two of these monstrously successful firms can help you establish a winning portfolio.

Stalking the monster
To find tomorrow's winners, we've enlisted the help of more than 150,000 monster trackers at Motley Fool CAPS. We've compiled a list of the most successful CAPS members, dubbed All-Stars, whose picks have doubled, tripled, or even quadrupled in price. Then we've plucked out some of their recent picks for stocks they find equally promising.

Player

CAPS Member Rating

Monster Stock

CAPS Score

Recent Stock Pick

CAPS Rating (out of 5)

TrackKeyBanc

93.99

MasterCard

138.68

J&J Snack Foods

*****

RIPLehman

99.69

Patriot Coal (NYSE:PCX)

218.61

MGM Mirage (NYSE:MGM)

**

OwslyStnly

93.53

Netflix

306.32

United States Oil (NYSE:USO)

***

dibble905

99.65

Ford

350.28

Disney (NYSE:DIS)

****

100ozRound

99.96

Teck Resources

513.63

Bucyrus International (NASDAQ:BUCY)

****

Score = By how many percentage points that pick is beating the S&P 500.

Of course, this is not a list of stocks to buy -- or, for those monster stocks that our CAPS All-Stars have already found, to sell. Just consider them starting points for your own further research of extreme buying opportunities.

In search of Bigfoot
A deep economic recession will inevitably cause a gambling mecca like Las Vegas to come up craps. Witness yesterday's results from Las Vegas Sands (NYSE:LVS), which did little to hearten casino-operator investors. MGM Mirage also released its earnings yesterday, revealing that it was no more likely to win Lady Luck's favor.

MGM hopes that its Macau IPO will boost results, as a similar offering did for Sands. But it will likely have to give up its stake in its New Jersey Borgata property to do so, to satisfy state regulators concerned about the alleged organized crime ties of MGM's Macau partner. In essence, by putting its ownership stake in the Borgata in a trust, it will be abandoning the state in favor of the greater potential Macau shows. MGM owns the Borgata with Boyd Gaming (NYSE:BYD).

Investors suspect MGM may simply be on a cold streak -- betting black while the roulette wheel keeps coming up red. While CAPS member Superdrol expects the casino operator to crap out eventually, wisesilverwolf thinks its reliance on Las Vegas, especially the real estate market, is a bet on the wrong side of the odds:

Gambling revenue in Las Vegas, the biggest betting center in the U.S., fell the most on record last year, causing declining sales at MGM Mirage. Navada real estate is toast, and Las Vegas real estate market is burnt toast. So December 2009 would have to be the worst time to launch that new $12 Billion dollar condo project, right? They already took a 30% hit on those condo prices, and we haven't yet gotten to the launch.

Although much of the CAPS community seems to disagree, a significant percentage (22%) of the more than 1,200 members rating the gaming hall expect it to underperform the market. Head over to the MGM Mirage CAPS page and throw the dice with your opinion on this company's future.

A chance for scary growth
It takes more than a few All-Star picks and a quick paragraph to make buy or sell decisions, so start your own research on these stocks on Motley Fool CAPS. You can read a company's financial reports, scrutinize key data and charts, and examine the comments your fellow investors have made, all from a stock's CAPS page. While you're there, weigh in with your own thoughts on whether these are tomorrow's monster stocks.

Disney is a Motley Fool Inside Value selection. Disney, Ford, and Netflix are Stock Advisor picks.

Fool contributor Rich Duprey holds no financial position in any of the stocks mentioned in this article. You can see his holdings here. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.