Best High Limit Credit Cards for Average Credit

Our shortlist of best-in-class credit cards, some of which are from our partners, can be your one-stop shop to finding the right credit card for your needs.

When it comes to credit cards, having an average credit score is a good thing -- perhaps a very good thing. Since credit cards are some of the easiest sources of credit to get approved for, an average credit score is often good enough to get approved for a credit card with a high credit limit.

For our purposes, we think of “average credit” as being somewhere in the range 30 points higher or lower than the average FICO® Score of 700, or anywhere from 670 to 730. It's worth noting what limit can be expected when you have average credit, which straddles the line between non-prime and prime credit. The average credit limit for non-prime cardholders was $4,674 and $7,593 for prime cardholders, according to Experian data.

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On Capital One's Secure Website.

Our Bottom Line

Credit limit -- Up to $2,500. Online forum participants have reported approved credit limits up to $2,500. Of course, actual approved limit will vary by applicant.

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What we Like:
  • 20,000 miles sign-up bonus
  • No annual fee
  • 0% intro APR offer
  • No foreign transaction fees
Key Scores:
4.0 5 Perks
5.0 5 Fees
5.0 5 APR
Perks 4.0/5
Fees 5.0/5
APR 5.0/5
  • Annual Fee: $0
  • Regular APR: 14.24% - 24.24% Variable
  • Intro APR: Purchases: 0%, 12 months Balance Transfers: N/A
Highlights
  • $0 annual fee and no foreign transaction fees
  • Earn a bonus of 20,000 miles once you spend $1,000 on purchases within 3 months from account opening, equal to $200 in travel
  • Earn 1.25X miles on every purchase, every day
  • Earn 10X miles on thousands of hotels, through January 2020; learn more at hotels.com/venture
  • Transfer your miles to over 12 leading travel loyalty programs
  • Enjoy 0% intro APR on purchases for 12 months; 14.24% - 24.24% variable APR after that
  • Travel when you want with no blackout dates and fly any airline, stay at any hotel, anytime
  • Miles won't expire for the life of the account and there's no limit to how many you can earn
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On Discover's Secure Website.

Our Bottom Line

Credit limit -- Up to $25,000. One of the highest limit balance-transfer cards we've come across. Highly-qualified applicants have reported approved limits of up to $25,000.

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What we Like:
  • Balance transfer offer
  • Rotating bonus cash back
  • No annual fee
  • FICO® Score for free
Key Scores:
5.0 5 Perks
4.0 5 Fees
4.5 5 APR
Perks 5.0/5
Fees 4.0/5
APR 4.5/5
  • Annual Fee: $0
  • Regular APR: 14.24% - 25.24% Variable
  • Intro APR: Purchases: 0%, 6 months Balance Transfers: 0%, 18 months
Highlights
  • INTRO OFFER: Discover will match ALL the cash back you've earned at the end of your first year, automatically. There's no signing up. And no limit to how much is matched.
  • Earn 5% cash back at different places each quarter like gas stations, grocery stores, restaurants, Amazon.com and more up to the quarterly maximum, each time you activate. Plus, earn unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases - automatically.
  • Redeem cash back any amount, any time. Rewards never expire.
  • 100% U.S. based customer service.
  • Get your free Credit Scorecard with your FICO® Credit Score, number of recent inquiries and more.
  • Get an alert if we find your Social Security number on any of thousands of Dark Web sites.* Activate for free.
  • No annual fee.
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Rates & Fees
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On Chase's Secure Website.

Our Bottom Line

Credit limit -- up to $24,000. This card's versatility makes it a leading cash-back credit card, which includes unlimited cash rewards, a 0% intro APR offer, and no annual fee.

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What we Like:
  • Innovative sign up bonus
  • Unlimited 1.5% cash back
  • 0% intro APR offer for 15 months
Key Scores:
5.0 5 Perks
4.0 5 Fees
4.0 5 APR
Perks 5.0/5
Fees 4.0/5
APR 4.0/5
  • Annual Fee: $0
  • Regular APR: 17.24% - 25.99%, variable
  • Intro APR: Purchases: 0%, 15 months Balance Transfers: 0%, 15 months
Highlights
  • New Offer! Double Cash Back: Earn 3% cash back on all purchases in your first year up to $20,000 spent. After that earn unlimited 1.5% cash back on all purchases.
  • 0% Intro APR for 15 months from account opening on purchases and balance transfers, then a variable APR of 17.24-25.99%. Balance transfer fee is 3% of the amount transferred, $5 minimum
  • No minimum to redeem for cash back
  • Cash Back rewards do not expire as long as your account is open
  • Free credit score, updated weekly with Credit JourneySM
  • No annual fee
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Apply Now
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On Chase's Secure Website.

Our Bottom Line

Credit limit -- Up to $24,000. Like it's Unlimited cousin, this offer packs in a slate of perks that are rare in a no-annual-fee card. Add in the fact that it offers bonus cash back and you can understand the value it offers beyond just a high credit limit.

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What we Like:
  • Cash sign-up bonus
  • Earn up to 5% cash back
  • 0% intro APR offer for 15 months
  • No annual fee
Key Scores:
5.0 5 Perks
4.0 5 Fees
4.0 5 APR
Perks 5.0/5
Fees 4.0/5
APR 4.0/5
  • Annual Fee: $0
  • Regular APR: 17.24%-25.99%, variable
  • Intro APR: Purchases: 0%, 15 months Balance Transfers: 0%, 15 months
Highlights
  • Earn a $150 Bonus after you spend $500 on purchases in your first 3 months from account opening
  • Earn 5% cash back on up to $1,500 in combined purchases in bonus categories each quarter you activate. Enjoy new 5% categories each quarter!
  • Unlimited 1% cash back on all other purchases – it’s automatic
  • 0% Intro APR for 15 months from account opening on purchases and balance transfers, then a variable APR of 17.24-25.99%.
  • 3% intro balance transfer fee when you transfer a balance during the first 60 days your account is open, with a minimum of $5.
  • No annual fee
  • Cash Back rewards do not expire as long as your account is open and there is no minimum to redeem for cash back.
  • Free credit score, updated weekly with Credit JourneySM
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Apply Now
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On Capital One's Secure Website.

Our Bottom Line

Credit limit -- $500 min. Online forum participants have reported approved credit limits ranging from $1,000 to $2,000. Automatic credit limit increases considered after five consecutive on-time payments.

Read Full Review
What we Like:
  • Unlimited 1% cash back
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • No annual fee
Key Scores:
4.0 5 Perks
4.0 5 Fees
4.0 5 APR
Perks 4.0/5
Fees 4.0/5
APR 4.0/5
  • Annual Fee: $0
  • Regular APR: 25.24% Variable
  • Intro APR: Purchases: N/A Balance Transfers: N/A
Highlights
  • Enjoy no annual fee
  • Earn 1% cash back on every purchase
  • Build business credit with responsible use
  • Fraud coverage if your card is ever lost or stolen
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • Enjoy business benefits including Year-End Summaries, employee cards at no extra cost and experienced small business customer service
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Why you can trust us

As credit card nerds, we’re always looking for an interesting deal -- even if we don't plan on applying ourselves. Armed with our own personal experience with the cards in our wallets, and data gathered from thousands of applicant experiences across the internet, we found a few cards that stood out for offering high credit limits even if you have an average credit score. Best of all, our favorite picks also offer additional value in the form of rewards, 0% intro APRs, and other perks that make them more than just another high-limit credit card.

What is an average credit score?

For our purposes, we're considering a FICO® Score of 670 to 730 as average. You could have a score in this range by having a short history of making 100% on-time payments, or by having a long credit history with one or two blemishes on your record. Someone who is in college and has no other records other than on-time payments on student loans, for example, would likely have an “average” credit score.

Good work, 'Merica!

In 2017, the national average FICO® Score hit 700 for the first time. Let's keep climbing together and set a new record!

Having an average credit score isn’t bad. It just means…well, your credit is average. Assuming you don’t have an extraordinarily high income, you might find it difficult to get approved for the highest-tier rewards cards, but you’ll safely qualify for other high limit cards in the cash back category, for example.

How an average credit score affects your credit limit

While it’s true that card issuers use your credit score to determine how big your credit limit should be -- and whether or not to approve you in the first place! -- your score is not the only factor that credit issuers consider. Data points suggest that people who have average credit qualify for cards with average credit limits of $3,000 to $5,000, though it’s possible to qualify for cards with high credit limits in excess of $10,000.

At a certain point, your income, not your credit score, is a much more important factor for your credit limits. After all, even if you had the highest possible credit FICO® Score (850), you would likely get turned down for almost any credit card you applied for if you don’t have an income. In many ways, your credit score is indicative of your willingness to make payments, not necessarily your capacity to make payments on a card.

Using publicly-available databases that collect data points from card applicants, we’ve found that many people who have average credit scores can be approved for credit limits that venture into the tens of thousands of dollars. Of course, there are also many cards that can be opened with lower limits that can be gradually increased over time.

How to improve your approval odds for a high credit limit

Your credit score is but one piece of the overall puzzle in determining your odds of approval, and the credit limit you ultimately receive. Here are a few things that can significantly increase the odds you are approved for a higher credit limit, even if you have merely “average” credit.

Have minimal balances on other cards and loans

Banks determine credit limits by working backwards to figure out how much debt you can have without ruining your monthly budget. One common metric used in the credit decision process is your debt-to-income ratio, or the minimum payments on all other obligations divided by your gross monthly income. Someone who earns $5,000 per month and has $1,000 in combined rent, mortgage, and debt payments (a debt-to-income ratio of 20%) would naturally be able to make payments on a larger credit card balance than someone who earns $5,000 per month and has $2,500 of monthly obligations.

Have a clean credit record

For our purposes, we’ve said that “average credit” is somewhere in the range of a FICO® Score between 670 and 730. There are many ways to get a score in that range, but having a short credit history with no late payments is arguably better than having a long credit history with a couple negative marks mixed in. Whether you’re currently in the market for a new credit card or not, it pays to make sure all the information in your credit report is accurate. You can check your credit report by visiting AnnualCreditReport.com, which is the only truly free way to check your credit report and clear up any inaccuracies with all three major credit bureaus.

Have sufficient income

It doesn’t matter how good your credit score is if you don’t have any income to support a high credit limit. Credit card issuers often ask for your gross annual household income on an application. That means income before any taxes, contributions to a retirement account, payments for health insurance, etc. Many card companies also allow you to include any investment income, disability income, alimony, and other payments as “income” for the purposes of applying for a card.

Reasons to get a high limit card with average credit

There are many reasons why you might want a high limit credit card, even if you have average credit and average spending needs.

  1. Help your credit score -- Having access to a lot of credit, but using only a small portion of it, indicates that you don’t spend money you don’t have just because you can. Roughly 30% of your FICO® Score is determined based on your balances as a percentage of your credit lines. Conventional wisdom suggests keeping your balances at less than 30% of your available credit limits to get the highest possible benefit from this part of the credit scoring equation. For obvious reasons, it’s much easier to avoid going over 30% of your credit limit if you have a $20,000 limit instead of a $1,000 limit.
  2. Easier approval for higher-tier cards -- Many of the most elite rewards cards offer ridiculously high sign-up bonuses, travel perks, and other advantages you won’t find on the “average” credit card. Data points suggest that having a high-limit credit card on your credit report can make it easier to get approved for elite credit cards in the future, cards which have credit limits that start at $10,000 and only go higher.
  3. More spending power -- If you only have a “starter” credit card with a small credit limit, you know how frustrating it can be to have to pay off your credit card multiple times each month to avoid going over the limit, especially since most cards charge a fee if you go over your limit. Having a card on which you can comfortably fit all of your monthly spending simply makes it easier to manage your monthly budget.

The extra “oomph” you get to your credit score from having a high credit limit credit card is one of the biggest perks, and one reason why it’s advantageous to try to get higher limits over time. Having a high limit helps you manage your credit utilization ratio in the best possible range, helping you keep your credit score as high as it can be no matter how heavily you use your card from month to month.

What to do if your application is denied

Getting denied for a credit card is something everyone experiences at one point or another. Many card issuers use automated systems to determine whether or not to approve you. You might get denied for something as simple as misspelling your name on the application, or because the bank has an issue verifying your address.

Here’s what to do if you’re denied:

  1. Wait for a letter -- The card company will send you a letter in the mail explaining why it denied your application. It will also tell you which credit bureau it used to look up your credit report and score, as well as what your score was when they pulled your information. This data can be very important. If you get a letter that says your score was 600 when you thought it was around 680, it’s a sign there may be something wrong with your credit report.
  2. Call in for reconsideration -- Denial letters usually list a phone number that you can call to ask that the card issuer reconsider your application. Always call in and request reconsideration, but have a pitch ready. It can help to explain why you want the card and how you’ll use it. Having a reason for any late payments and other derogatory credit marks in the past can also help sell you to the card issuer.
  3. Consider alternatives -- Only after you are denied for reconsideration should you consider applying for a different card. A card issuer will pull your credit file every time you apply for a credit card, but rarely will a card issuer pull your credit again for reconsideration. Each credit pull will temporarily cost you a few points on your credit score, so it makes sense to minimize credit inquiries when you can.

To recap, here are the best high limit cards for average credit

Card Credit limit Great For…
Capital One® VentureOne® Rewards Credit Card Graphic of Capital One® VentureOne® Rewards Credit Card Credit limit:

Up to $2,500

Great For:

Fair credit and travel rewards

Discover it® Balance Transfer Graphic of Discover it® Balance Transfer Credit limit:

Up to $25,000

Great For:

Balance transfers

Chase Freedom Unlimited® Graphic of Chase Freedom Unlimited® Credit limit:

up to $24,000

Great For:

Unlimited 1.5% cash back and no annual fee

Chase Freedom® Graphic of Chase Freedom® Credit limit:

Up to $24,000

Great For:

Bonus cash rewards and 0% intro APR

Capital One® Spark® Classic for Business Graphic of Capital One® Spark® Classic for Business Credit limit:

Up to $2,000

Great For:

Business