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Renasant Corp (NASDAQ:RNST)
Q1 2021 Earnings Call
Apr 28, 2021, 10:00 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good morning, and welcome to Renasant Corp. First Quarter 2021 Earnings Call and Webcast. [Operator Instructions] Please note that this event is being recorded. Now I'd like to turn the call over to Kelly Hutcheson, Renasant Corp. Please go ahead.

Kelly W. Hutcheson -- Executive Chief Acounting Officer

Good morning, and thank you for joining us for Renasant Corporation's 2021 First Quarter Webcast and Conference Call. Participating in this call today are members of Renasant's executive management team. Before we begin, please note that many of our comments during this call will be forward-looking statements, which involve risks and uncertainty. There are many factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the anticipated results or other expectations expressed in the forward-looking statements. Even while conditions in our footprint and across the country appear to be improving as COVID-19 vaccines are administered to more people, the impact of the pandemic and the federal, state and local measures taken to arrest the virus as well as all of the follow-on effects from this pandemic remain significant factors likely to impact our future financial condition and operating results. Other factors include, but are not limited to, interest rate fluctuation, regulatory changes, portfolio performance and other factors discussed in our recent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including our recently filed earnings release, which has been posted to our corporate site, www.renasant.com at the Press Releases link under the News & Market Data tab. Furthermore, the COVID-19 pandemic has magnified and likely will continue to magnify the impact of these factors on us. We undertake no obligation, and we specifically disclaim any obligation, to update or revise forward-looking statements to reflect changed assumptions, the occurrence of unanticipated events or changes to future operating results over time. In addition, some of the financial measures that we may discuss this morning are non-GAAP financial measures. A reconciliation of the non-GAAP measures to the most comparable GAAP measures can be found in our earnings release. And now I will turn the call over to our President and Chief Executive Officer, Mitch Waycaster.

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Kelly. Good morning. We appreciate you joining the call today. Before Kevin and Jim discuss results for the first quarter, I will offer observations on the quarter and our outlook for the balance of the year. First quarter results represent a good start to the year. The quarter was marked by stable credit metrics, a significant increase in deposits, slight net loan growth and strong reported net income. Performance in the quarter reflects contributions across all of our business lines and markets. We continue to see signs of improving economic activity throughout our region. Our hope is that this activity begins to spur additional loan demand in the second half of the year. At Renasant, we talk often about one team going to market as one bank. Throughout the pandemic, we have remained true to that approach in serving our customers. I believe our company has grown its reputation as a financial service provider of choice in these challenging times. We also remain committed to core principles, which emphasize core funding, asset quality and capital strength. I will now turn the call over to Kevin.

Kevin D. Chapman -- Chief Operating Officer & Chief Operating Officer

Thanks, Mitch. Our first quarter earnings were $58 million or $1.02 per diluted share. Several factors contributed to the first quarter's EPS. First, our mortgage division experienced another strong quarter in production. We fully recovered all impairment charges that we had recognized in previous quarters. Second, net interest income improved as a result of our ongoing deposit repricing efforts and PPP fee income recognized upon loan forgiveness. Last, our strong and stable asset quality metrics, coupled with an improved economic forecast, resulted in additional credit provision expense this quarter being unnecessary. Efficiency continues to be top of mind. And in the first quarter of 2021, we began to see the positive effects of two initiatives we introduced in the previous quarter aimed toward cost containment. Savings from our voluntary early retirement program are tracking according to our plan, and we completed the closure of six branches in early April. We still anticipate that these efforts will result in annual cost savings of approximately $9 million with around 75% of those savings realized during 2021. Our work on efficiency is not complete, and we continue to evaluate our operating model and the profitability of our branch network. And while short-term gains are often attractive, our efforts in this area are deliberate, and we consider the long-term impact of any decision before moving forward. By focusing on balance sheet growth, stabilizing margin, leveraging our other lines of business to generate additional fee income and reducing excess costs, we believe our efficiency goals can be attained. With vaccines becoming more broadly available and virus cases declining from the winter peak, we are seeing more economic activity in many markets throughout our footprint. Still, our digital and mobile metrics are trending in a positive direction. This affirms our belief that customer behavior continues to evolve and expectations for quicker and more convenient access to banking services will continue to grow stronger rather than fade with the pandemic. We are focused on innovation and seek investments that provide our customers with the technology and security that they've come to expect in this day and age. The Paycheck Protection Program continues to be an important focus of our team. We are assisting our customers through the forgiveness phase of round one PPP loans with around $268 million having been forgiven during the first quarter. We have approximately $861 million of round one PPP loans remaining on our balance sheet. We entered into a referral relationship with another firm to utilize its technology platform to originate round two PPP loans for our customers. This arrangement allows our relationship managers to focus on traditional loan growth and serving our customers through round one PPP forgiveness while ensuring we continue to meet the needs of our customers, as they operate through the lasting effects of the pandemic. In the first quarter, we realized approximately $2.3 million in referral fees from our partners. And now I'll turn it over to Jim.

James C. Mabry -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Kevin. As we walk through the quarter's results, I will reference slides from the earnings deck. Starting with the balance sheet, footings grew about $700 million in the quarter. This was largely driven by an increase in deposits, as shown on Page 9. Since the beginning of the pandemic, deposits are up about 20%, and much of that growth has been in noninterest-bearing accounts. Loans, excluding PPP, were essentially flat for the quarter, which, together with the deposit growth, brought our average loan-to-deposit ratio to 88%. There were $861 million in PPP loans outstanding at quarter end. And while the pace of forgiveness has been slower than we anticipated, we expect the process to accelerate over the next few quarters. During the quarter, capital ratios continued their build, as seen on Page 12, and provide the company with flexibility for possible loan growth, buybacks or M&A opportunities. In the quarter, we did not incur a credit provision expense, and the ACL as a percentage of loans, ex PPP, moved down from 1.80% to 1.76%. Credit quality metrics are shown on Pages 14 through 17. Past dues, classified and nonperforming asset measures all remain relatively steady. Net charge-offs for the quarter were approximately $3 million. COVID-related deferrals are now below 1%. Net interest income was up slightly and was aided by the recognition of a $2 million recovery of a previously charged-off purchased loan. PPP revenue was just under $11 million. Of the PPP income, accelerated recognition of deferred fees represented $4.6 million, and we have approximately $11 million in remaining deferred fees to be recognized. Our core margin, which excludes purchase accounting accretion and interest recoveries, was down one basis point from Q4 and after also excluding the impact from PPP, was down approximately 10 basis points. Excess cash weighed on the margin about 20 basis points in the quarter. Noninterest income benefited from another strong mortgage quarter that included the write-up of our MSR asset by $13 million. We also recognized $1.4 million of securities gains and fee income categories generally exhibited increases as well. Noninterest expenses with exclusions were up approximately $3 million for the quarter. Most of the increase was driven by an increase in mortgage compensation expense as a result of higher Q1 production. As Kevin mentioned, we also began to see the benefits of expense initiatives announced in Q4 and expect continued realization throughout the balance of the year. I will now turn the call back over to Mitch.

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Jim. In closing, we experienced a strong start to 2021 and we commend the drive and determination of all of our team members, without which, we wouldn't have earned this success. We remain committed to the safety and security of our employees, to meeting the needs of our clients and to being a good citizen in our communities, knowing that staying true to our core values will be a long-term value for our shareholders. Now I will turn the call over to the operator for Q&A.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] First question comes from Brad Milsaps from Piper Sandler, please go ahead.

Bradley Jason Milsaps -- Piper Sandler -- Analyst

Hey good morning. Thanks for taking my questions. I was curious if you could maybe just kind of talk a little bit about the kind of loan growth environment, kind of what you're seeing, kind of what your expectations are for the balance of the year. And importantly, kind of where are new loans coming on the books kind of relative to the current book yield?

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Absolutely. Happy to do that, Brad. Let me start with our 30-day pipeline, and then I'll reflect on the production for the quarter just ended and kind of how things look going forward. So we began this quarter with a pipeline of $240 million, that compares to $238 million for the prior quarter. So we continue to see, and I would say, considering being early in 2Q, a good, but I would continue to describe a cautiously optimistic deal flow and pipeline. The good thing, we continue to see that across all of our markets and business lines. If I break that down by market, 12% would be in Tennessee; 13% in Alabama, the Florida Panhandle; 22% in Georgia and Central Florida; 19% in Mississippi and 34% in our corporate commercial business lines. So just looking at the -- looking forward at this point based on that pipeline, that should result in approximately $72 million growth in nonpurchase outstanding within 30 days. To your question, the current pipeline indicates production of about, I would say, $575 million to $625 million range in the coming quarter. So we continue to expect positive loan growth in 2Q. Looking forward, until the resolution of the pandemic is more defined, it remains difficult to give guidance. I will say that, hopefully, with the stabilization of cases, the continued development in vaccines, Kevin referred to that in opening remarks, hopefully, we'll continue the positive momentum and the economic activity that we see. One thing that we certainly feel good about is our markets and our talent. And like I say, we continue to see whether -- you reflect on the production, we had $534 million in production past quarter. And if I look at that by region, it's reflective of our pipeline. We continue to see that across the various markets in the business line. As well, both from existing talent and the new talent that we've invested in, in the past number of quarters, again, that was close to 20% of our production. So again, feel good about talent, market and just the optimistic tone that we continue to hear from client base.

Bradley Jason Milsaps -- Piper Sandler -- Analyst

Thanks Mitch. And just in terms of rates on new loans. And then just maybe as my follow-up, I think I heard Kevin mention you guys still feel good about the cost savings that you outlined last quarter. I'm just curious if there's any update on any future expense savings as maybe you fight a little bit tougher mortgage comps as you get through '21. Or is the kind of the $9 million the number we need to kind of think about over the near term? Thank you!

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Sure. I'll ask Jim to comment on the pricing and maybe mortgage and then Kevin can circle back on the expense base question. Jim?

James C. Mabry -- Chief Financial Officer

Sure. Brad, on -- in terms of production and current yields. So our current core yield ex accretable yield and ex PPP is right about 4%. I think it's 4.01% or 4.02%. And if you look at the last few quarters, and I'll start with Q1 '20, this will give you a sense of what production is looking like in terms of its yield. Go back to Q1 '20, we were 4.36%, 3.84% in Q2, 3.76%, 3.85% in Q4 and 3.70% in Q1. And Kevin, I don't know if you want to pick up on his -- the second part there.

Kevin D. Chapman -- Chief Operating Officer & Chief Operating Officer

Sure. Be glad to, Brad. Just on the expenses, I think Jim laid out in his comments, where we are as far as achieving the expense saves that we announced and the two initiatives that we announced in Q4. As we look at further cost saves, there's still several options on the table for us as we move forward. Just on the branch network, we continue to evaluate the branch network. We have a couple of items, a couple of action items that will occur in Q2 and Q3 where we're looking to taking a couple of closely located branches and consolidating them into one. We have the potential for -- we have three instances of that, where we take two to three branches and consolidate them into 1. Long term, we'll continue to evaluate not only the branch network but just our staffing models and look for ways to be cognizant of expense saves. On the revenue side, I would highlight a couple of things just in the numbers, they may not have stuck out. But just on the noninterest income, a couple of things that we think are notable. One is we saw an uptick in service charges. And that's an uptick when we got another round of liquidity from stimulus checks. And so that went counterintuitive that we actually saw the uptick. So we're starting to see some of our other fee income come back to us that really declined significantly in 2020. The other thing I'd highlight is our fees and commissions, they're up $300,000 on a linked-quarter basis. And so as we look at our efficiency and as we look at the potential headwinds in mortgage in later years, some of other noninterest income lines, we expect to kick in as well as the expense saving initiatives to help with the efficiency.

Operator

Thank you. Next question comes from Jennifer Demba of Truist Securities. Please go ahead.

Jennifer Haskew Demba -- Truist Securities, Inc., -- Analyst

Thank you. Can hear me?

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Good morning Jennifer!

Jennifer Haskew Demba -- Truist Securities, Inc., -- Analyst

Good morning, Question on -- Jim mentioned acquisition interest in his monologue. Just curious at how you're thinking about that right now. There has been an uptick in activity over the past few months. And how do you think about it when you look at buyers' price reactions over the short term? How do you think about that when you evaluate pricing on a deal or whether you're going to do a deal at all?

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Thank you, Jennifer. And let me start by saying, as we have consistently done in our past, we remain opportunistic. So I mentioned talent when I was talking about loan production, we added -- and I'm going to circle back, particularly to M&A, to your question, but we added six additional producers in Q1. In some cases, certainly, that's new markets. But it's certainly strategic partners, to your question. And we continue to evaluate opportunities that drive shareholder value. And relative to how we get there, we always begin with culture and business model and risk appetite and just making sure alignment exists as you're considering price and all of the things, the considerations that would go into that transaction. But really, all to answer the question, are we better together? And you know we see those opportunities. We continue to evaluate those opportunities.

Jennifer Haskew Demba -- Truist Securities, Inc., -- Analyst

Ok. Thank you very much!

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Thank you! The next question is from Kevin Fitzsimmons of D.A. Davidson. Please go ahead!

Kevin Patrick Fitzsimmons -- D.A. Davidson & Co., -- Analyst

Hey good morning guys! On that topic on M&A, there's a number of large bank acquisitions that are either pending or recently closed that are going on in or around your footprint. I'm just curious if you view those as potential opportunities for gaining talent, gaining business, or whether it's not necessarily going to be a big tailwind for you.

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. So Kevin, good question. Of course, we've had this discussion in the past and as we have seen in the past, maybe not specific to those that were recently announced, but I think as the industry -- in the industry, certainly, disruption, in many cases, proves opportunities. But typically, that comes from just relationships with people maybe already in the company, conversations that have been continuing for some length of time and then in some cases, that change causes people possibly to make a choice relative to their employment. So the main thing we do here is we certainly have good talent, and we continue to have those conversations. As I just mentioned, we had six new producers join in the first quarter. So as we do consistently, we look for the opportunity to have those. And to your point, sometimes those changes in the industry result in those conversations maybe picking up or somebody making a decision. So we do see it as a potential opportunity.

Kevin Patrick Fitzsimmons -- D.A. Davidson & Co., -- Analyst

Okay. Thanks Mitch! Just maybe -- obviously, from the whole group, we're seeing this quarter, the drag of excess liquidity and what that means to the margin and perhaps even getting larger, right, with stimulus checks. But I'm just curious how -- philosophically, how you're looking at that excess liquidity. It looks like you have stepped up securities purchases in your asset base. But I'm not sure where that is right now relative to your comfort level. And at the same time, if you think loan demand and growth is going to pick up, then maybe you feel you can put some of that cash that sticks around to work that way. But just curious, like is it -- are there still levers you can pull to offset the drag of that on dollars of NII? Or is it just a matter of waiting out this period? Thanks!

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Sure. Thank you, Kevin. I'll let Jim respond to the liquidity and putting it to work.

Kevin D. Chapman -- Chief Operating Officer & Chief Operating Officer

And I think you sort of alluded to the answer at the end of your question, but a couple of observations. So the deposits have been stickier, I think, than maybe all of us thought going into this. And the deposit growth numbers we saw in Q1, we continue to see growth early in Q2. So at this point, it doesn't seem to be abating in terms of that liquidity challenge. Our thoughts on deploying that liquidity is we want to take sort of a thoughtful and balanced approach. We're not going to put all the liquidity to work in one quarter. And we also don't know the behavior of those deposits and how they're going to behave in future quarters. So the hope is that as we get to the second half of the year, we'll start to see increases in loans, and that will absorb that liquidity. We clearly don't know. I'd say the other thing is that while as you point out, it does weigh on the margin, we're also focused on net interest income. And the goal there to try to keep that as steady as possible. And so it's -- yes, margin is definitely a focus, but we're also thinking about the dollars. So we don't have a silver bullet as it relates to this. But I think what you're going to see from us is probably some continued build in the securities book but not dramatic.

Operator

Next question comes from Catherine Mealor of KBW. Please go ahead.

Catherine Fitzhugh Summerson Mealor -- Keefe, Bruyette, & Woods, Inc., -- Analyst

Thank you, good morning! Just a question on mortgage and your outlook for mortgage revenue view in the back half of this year and maybe also an update on how you think about where the mortgage efficiency can turn to.

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Jim?

James C. Mabry -- Chief Financial Officer

Sure. Good morning Catherine. So in terms of mortgage, I guess a couple of thoughts. I mean we had a good quarter there. But we're mindful of what's going on in that business and our expectations are that it certainly is not going to be what it was in '20 and that in the upcoming quarters of '21, it's going to continue to fall off and not be the tailwind that it was in '20. And I think along those lines, that's -- this is something obviously that we and others anticipated as we went into the year. So we're not -- if things do turn around there, great, but we're not counting on that. And we're thinking about other ways to try to replace that income and the drag on efficiency. So whether it's other revenue things or as Kevin talked about, other expense initiatives. But with that mortgage, the profitability is not going to be probably what it was in '20. So we'll see that gain on sale margin decline and the efficiency ratio go up, which will be a drag on overall efficiency. So we'll see. Inventory is the biggest -- I think the biggest issue there. And as you know, there's just not a lot of inventory out there. And I think when you talk to our mortgage bankers, that's the thing they're looking for is to see some improvement there because that would certainly drive volume, and we're really a purchase shop, and that's you know what we're hoping for as we get into the second half of the year.

Catherine Fitzhugh Summerson Mealor -- Keefe, Bruyette, & Woods, Inc., -- Analyst

That makes sense. Got it. That makes sense. Okay. And then maybe just on the reserve, there's a lot of talk about reserve levels heading back to kind of the day one CECL number. How do you think about that path and where you think Renasant's ACL ratio eventually bottomed?

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Catherine. Jim, do you want to comment?

James C. Mabry -- Chief Financial Officer

Sure. So as you saw, we didn't have an expense in Q1. And we'll see what the data shows for the ensuing quarters. But mentally, again, I think like we've been in prior quarters and probably like others, we hope that we can absorb some of that cushion, if you will, through loan growth. And I think the other thing that weighs on us is we're still in a pandemic. We're still in uncertain times. And we're not going to be -- we don't want to be in a hurry to see that allowance go down. I think we started, when we adopted CECL, we were a touch below 1% day 1. And I don't think that's -- I don't see us getting back to that level anytime soon. Just -- and we'll see what the model yields. But just mentally, I don't think that's something we're going to be comfortable with. So we're -- I don't know what that number is, and we'll see what the data yields, but I think as we go through the year, we're really hoping for that loan growth to absorb that allowance. And so again, I don't think we're going to be -- we're probably not -- we're not anxious to release reserves is, I guess, the best way to say it.

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Next question comes from Matt Olney at Stephens. Please go ahead.

Matthew Covington Olney -- Stephens Inc., -- Analyst

Hey thanks, good morning guys! I want to circle back on the mortgage discussion, and you guys gave some good disclosures on Slide 23 of your presentation. I was surprised that locked volume increased from 4Q '20 to 1Q '21. Looks like it was around 20% or so. Any different strategy with respect to your mortgage channels in the first quarter? Just trying to appreciate why that increased.

James C. Mabry -- Chief Financial Officer

Yes, Matt, I don't know there was anything that was different about the way we did business from Q4 to Q1. We did see that volume grow, as you point out, it came at a smaller margin, but there was nothing that we did dramatically different in pursuing the business that we got in Q1. Kevin, I don't know if there are any thoughts you want to add to that.

Kevin D. Chapman -- Chief Operating Officer & Chief Operating Officer

No. Again, I don't think there's anything that we did differently. We do continue to look at opportunities for new hires. We do have multiple channels. As you can see, wholesale ticked up a little bit. So I don't -- I'm not sure there's anything in particular other than just continuing to be in markets where we see a significant amount of inbound migration. If you look at the states that we operate in within our mortgage group, they are -- there's above-average inbound migrations in those states. And so it may just be the fact that the markets we're in are just providing more opportunity and we expect that trend to continue. We expect inbound migration in those states to continue. So that will be a tailwind for us as we look out in the future on mortgage. As Jim mentioned, the constrained supply, it's inventory. Outside of that, we still remain optimistic about our outlook on mortgage.

Matthew Covington Olney -- Stephens Inc., -- Analyst

Thanks for that. And I hopped on the call a few minutes late, so you may have disclosed this, but do you have what the -- within mortgage, what the originations and sales volumes were in the first quarter?

James C. Mabry -- Chief Financial Officer

We've got -- the lock volume, of course, is on Page 23. The other data, I'll have to get back to you on.

Matthew Covington Olney -- Stephens Inc., -- Analyst

Okay. That's fine. And then just -- largely, just gain-on-sale margins in the first quarter. I think some of your peers talked about additional pressure on gain-on-sale margins later in the quarter. Did you see any of this pressure? Just any thoughts on margins from here. Thanks!

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

We did see that. And if you were to look at that -- if you look at Q1 by month, you would see exactly what you talked about in terms of declines in the margins from January to February, February to March. So we'll see what the year holds. But yes, we're -- I think we're seeing the same things others are. And our expectation is that's going to continue, absent some change in the rate environment.

Matthew Covington Olney -- Stephens Inc., -- Analyst

Okay. And then outside of mortgage, but sticking with fees, I think other fees were still a little elevated this quarter. I'm showing around $10 million. I think it was running about $3 million to $4 million per quarter range. I see you guys disclosed around $2 million of fees from referrals around PPP. Anything else in the first quarter we should be thinking about with respect to fees within other?

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

I don't know that anything sticks out. I mean as Kevin mentioned in his comments earlier, there was -- it was broad-based. I don't know that there's any one category that sticks out. PPP, you mentioned -- you pointed $2.3 million in PPP.

Kevin D. Chapman -- Chief Operating Officer & Chief Operating Officer

Matt, would highlight one other thing, and it's a normal occurrence in Q1, and that is in our insurance company. We have some contingency income. It's a onetime item -- it's not a onetime item. It occurs once a year, typically in March and April, so if you look at year-over-year, Q1 to Q1, the impact isn't as drastic. But if you look at Q4 to Q1, there's a pretty significant swing and that's upwards of $750,000 that we recognized in Q1 in contingency income. And that's, again, normal recurring, coming out of our insurance company, but it typically happens in -- the majority of it happens in Q1 of each year.

Matthew Covington Olney -- Stephens Inc., -- Analyst

Okay. And then on the PPP fee, the $2.3 million in other. Could we see additional referral fees like that in the future? Or is this just a onetime benefit from the originations that you got in 1Q?

James C. Mabry -- Chief Financial Officer

The way we're tracking, I would expect that Q2 would look similar to Q1. And in terms of round 2, we'll see how it plays out from there. But as we look at Q2, I would think you'd see a similar impact on earnings in Q2.

Matthew Covington Olney -- Stephens Inc., -- Analyst

And to clarify, I'm talking about fee income with respect to the $2.3 million, not the PPP fees that are within net interest income. Is that the same thing you're talking about, Jim?

James C. Mabry -- Chief Financial Officer

Yes, that's correct. I'm referring to sort of round two of PPP and the fee income we're getting off of that. Correct.

Matthew Covington Olney -- Stephens Inc., -- Analyst

Okay. And is there a tail on that, that could go beyond 2Q? Or once the program is shut down, presumably here in a few weeks, then there wouldn't be a tail beyond that?

James C. Mabry -- Chief Financial Officer

It's -- I think likely after Q2, you won't -- you would not see meaningful contribution from round two PPP in our fee income.

Operator

This concludes our question-and-answer session. Now I'd like to turn the conference back over to Mr. Waycaster for closing remarks. Please go ahead.

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Nick, and we appreciate each of your time, your interest in Renasant Corporation. We look forward to speaking with you again soon and look forward to participating in the Gulf South Bank Conference on May three and the D.A. Davidson Annual Financial Institutions Conference on the 6th. Thank you.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Duration: 35 minutes

Call participants:

Kelly W. Hutcheson -- Executive Chief Acounting Officer

C. Mitchell Waycaster -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Kevin D. Chapman -- Chief Operating Officer & Chief Operating Officer

James C. Mabry -- Chief Financial Officer

Bradley Jason Milsaps -- Piper Sandler -- Analyst

Jennifer Haskew Demba -- Truist Securities, Inc., -- Analyst

Kevin Patrick Fitzsimmons -- D.A. Davidson & Co., -- Analyst

Catherine Fitzhugh Summerson Mealor -- Keefe, Bruyette, & Woods, Inc., -- Analyst

Matthew Covington Olney -- Stephens Inc., -- Analyst

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