Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility

Universal Display Corp (OLED) Q3 2021 Earnings Call Transcript

By Motley Fool Transcribers – Nov 4, 2021 at 11:02PM

You’re reading a free article with opinions that may differ from The Motley Fool’s Premium Investing Services. Become a Motley Fool member today to get instant access to our top analyst recommendations, in-depth research, investing resources, and more. Learn More

OLED earnings call for the period ending September 30, 2021.

Logo of jester cap with thought bubble.

Image source: The Motley Fool.

Universal Display Corp (OLED 0.53%)
Q3 2021 Earnings Call
Nov 4, 2021, 5:00 p.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good day, ladies and gentlemen, and welcome to Universal Display's Third Quarter 2021 Earnings Conference Call. My name is Sherry, and I will be your conference moderator for today's call. [Operator Instructions] As a reminder, this conference is being recorded for replay purposes. I would now like to turn the call over to Darice Liu, Director of Investor Relations. Please proceed.

10 stocks we like better than Universal Display
When our award-winning analyst team has a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.* 

They just revealed what they believe are the ten best stocks for investors to buy right now... and Universal Display wasn't one of them! That's right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

See the 10 stocks

*Stock Advisor returns as of October 20, 2021

Darice Liu -- Director of Investor Relations & Corporate Communications

Thank you, and good afternoon, everyone. Welcome to Universal Display's third quarter earnings conference call. Joining me on the call today are Steve Abramson, President and Chief Executive Officer; and Sid Rosenblatt, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. [Operator Instructions]. Now I'd like to turn the call over to Steve Abramson.

Steve Abramson -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Thanks, Darice, and welcome to everyone on today's call. We are pleased to report that revenue in the third quarter of 2021 was $143.6 million. Operating profit was $57.7 million, and net income was $46.1 million or $0.97 per diluted share. Steve will go into further details on our financials. But first, let me provide an update on our outlook on the OLED industry and the company. As we look to the OLED market, we believe that panel makers and OEMs are preparing for a new wave of investment and product proliferation in the coming years.

For display makers, there are three large consumer electronic end market opportunities, smartphones, IT, which includes tablets, laptops and monitors and TVs in a digital [Indecipherable] minimally, smartwatch, [billing], automotive, lighting and signage markets. So where are we today? As we enter 2021, about 1/3 of the smartphone market was penetrated by OLEDs. And by year-end, based on market research forecast, OLED penetration is expected to widen to approximately 45% of the smartphone market.

This has been largely driven by OLED adoption broadening beyond the premium segment and into the midrange as well as even some low-end smartphones with more panel makers participating in the smartphone OLED market and panel pricing expected to decline, we believe that penetration is poised to expand further. One of the panel makers investing in smartphone OLED capacity is BOE. BOE has two Gen-6 OLED panel production lines in operation and according to reports, BOE is currently setting up its third Gen-6 OLED fab in Chongqing with mass production of the first phase to begin in the second half of 2022.

When fully ramped, BOE's three OLED fabs will have a combined total capacity of 144,000 Gen-6 substrate starts per month. In addition, BOE's plans to build a fourth OLED panel production line in Southeastern China. Augmenting the growth of the OLED smartphone market is the exciting and burgeoning foldable phone market. Foldable smartphones are widely expected to become the fastest-growing phone category, with market research forecasts calling for foldable OLED panel shipments to increase from 10 million units in 2021 to about 67 million units by 2025. Looking forward, what are the additional applications expected to significantly drive growth in the OLED market. Let's start with TVs.

OLEDs continue to gain strong traction in the TV market. LG Display motor on its earnings call last week that expects to ship approximately eight million OLED TVs in 2021 are from last year's 4.5 million units. And for 2022, LGD believes 10 million OLED TV units is an achievable target as it ramps up an additional 30,000 plates per month of Gen-8.5 OLED capacity in Guangzhou, China. From a market penetration standpoint, OLED TVs are expected to make up about 3% of the addressable TV market at the end of 2021. While 3% is a low single-digit number, it also shines a tremendously on the incredibly large adoption curve potential for OLED TVs.

Just to give you some context on what the TV market potential is from a display area perspective, approximately 5% OLED penetration of the TV market is greater than 50% OLED penetration of the smartphone market from a square meter in standpoint. That has a lot of substrate area for material players like us. Moving along to the emerging OLED IT market. This market opportunity of laptops, tablets and monitors has begun to be a focus for OLED manufacturers. The Samsung Display champions the OLED IT adoption charge, we are beginning to see the nascent stages of proliferation in IT applications materialize. As many of you are aware, OLED displays offer more immersive colors, higher contrast ratios, faster response times and wider viewing angles at LCD panels.

Samsung is making good progress in the OLED laptop market, where it is supplying OLED panels to global manufacturers, including ASUS, Lenovo, Dell, HP and Samsung Electronics. So how big of an opportunity is the OLED IT market-based on market research estimates, OLEDs are expected to account for a mere 2% in the IT market by year-end. That means it is an enormous opportunity, and it's an opportunity that an increasing number of OLED panel makers are broadening into. We believe that OLEDs are still in the early innings of a long-term secular growth market. As display makers expand their focus from small to medium and large area, reports are emerging about potential new Gen-6, Gen-8.5 and even Gen-10 OLED capacity plans, new OLED device architectures and new consumer product road maps that include an expanding portfolio of OLED applications.

With this next wave of adoption taking shape, we are fortifying our position as an OLED leader and innovator on multiple fronts. We are leveraging our 25-plus years of pioneering research, know-how and experience into new materials and new technologies. We are also expanding our footprint, building our infrastructure that is designed to drive an effective cost structure and targeting new opportunities. These initiatives will further enable us to provide continued value to our customers while keeping UDC at the forefront of the growing OLED industry. On the FOLED front, the discovery, design, development and delivery of new and next-generation phosphorescent emissive materials, including new reds, greens, yellows and hosts, is at the core of our R&D programs.

With respect to blue, we continue to make excellent progress in our ongoing development work for a commercial phosphorescent blue emissive system. We believe that the commercial phosphorescent blue is a question of when and not if. We plan to deliver an allphosphorescent RGB stack, which will further enable higher energy efficiency and high-performance for OLED applications across the consumer landscape. With the largest phosphorescent OLED team in the world, we are driving innovation at the molecular level through new materials and new device architectures.

Our approach to our broadening FOLED materials portfolio is both extensive and cohesive. This includes our computational, synthetic, mechanistic and process chemistry expertise, coupled with our physicists, engineers and technicians. Our development teams work closely with customers as we invent and commercialize next-generation materials to meet panel makers ever-changing and ever-evolving specifications for color point, efficiency and lifetime. And our PHOLED Application Centers located in Korea and Hong Kong provide a localize UDC engineering team to work directly with our customers in developing PHOLED performance data to support their rapid new product cycle times.

The consistent and successful execution of meeting multiple product cycles every year is part of UDC's core strength. It is why we are the key OLED material supplier of choice to the industry and why we have long-term relationships with all the leading OLED panel makers. We take our customers' ambitious targets, fulfilling our objectives and deliver industry-leading materials that drive the ultimate performance of our customers' growing OLED product portfolio. Our long-term partnership with PPG is a principal factor in our ability to accelerate a developmental material to a high-volume commercial material. Through our two decades of cooperation and collaboration, we have cultivated and bolstered our best-in-class manufacturing know-how and expertise.

This partnership has enabled us to continuously introduce state-of-the-art phosphorescent emitters to our global customers. Speaking of customers, I would like to share that we have extended our long-term commercial material and license agreements with Tianma Micro-electronics. We are pleased to continue our strong partnership with this leading Chinese panel maker as they continue to advance their OLED presence and expand their OLED portfolio plans. Now moving along to the OLED technology front. One of the primary R&D programs we are working on is plasma on FOLED, our fundamental groundbreaking device architecture. While still in research, we believe that the potential benefits to customers in the industry are significant.

We estimate that plasma on FOLED has the potential to increase device lifetime by up to 10 times and double the efficiency, which we believe will pave the path for new OLED applications. On the OLED production front, we are in the midst of retrofitting the first phase of a multiyear project at our new manufacturing site in Shannon, Ireland, with our partner of over 20 years PPG for the production of our highly efficient, high-performing universal FOLED materials. This new facility will diversify the manufacturing base for our phosphorescent emitters to meet growing OLED market demand and evolving industry requirements.

It will be designed to serve all of our customers for red, green, yellow and in the future, blue emitter production. The site is expected to double our production capacity within the next five years. On the OLED manufacturing front, we have been working on OVJP or organic vapor jet printing, a novel manufacturing printing process that allows manufacturers to use a gas vapor stream to dry print, red, green and blue small molecule materials directly onto a substrate without the need of a mask set or solvents.

In addition to patterning with OLEC mask, OVJP represents a next-generation process platform to enable high-performance device designs with green and mixed layers. We believe OVJP represents a low-cost, high performance, high throughput, highly efficient, large area pattern OLED manufacturing process platform. Our OVJP team, which consists of approximately 50 people, are continuing the development path for OVJP equipment and an advanced process platform. The OVJP technology development team in Ewing, New Jersey is working hand-in-hand with the OVJP equipment team in Silicon Valley to advance our commercialization road map.

The teams are currently working on the key subsystems to prove the viability of OVJP for large area manufacturing. Achieving this milestone is a critical element in the building blocks for our alpha system design. While the commercial launch of OVJP is still a few years away, this estimated multi-billion-dollar revenue opportunity as part of our multidimensional approach to long-term growth. For over 25 years, innovation has been and continues to be a primary driving force at UDC. We believe that these near term, mid-term and long-term strategic initiatives will further advance our robust OLED materials and technology leadership and strengthen and support our primary focus of enabling our customer success and, therefore, our success. On that note, let me turn the call over to Sid.

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

Thank you, Steve, and again, thank you, everyone, for joining our call today. Revenue for the third quarter of 2021 was a record $143.6 million compared to second quarter 2021 of $129.7 million and third quarter 2020 is $117.1 million. Our total material sales were $75.6 million in the third quarter of 2021 compared to material sales of $77.4 million in the second quarter of 2021 and $68.7 million in the third quarter of 2020. Green emitter sales in the third quarter of 2021, which include our yellow green emitters, were $57.8 million, which is sequentially flat from the second quarter of 2021 and compared to $52.9 million in the third quarter of 2020. Red emitter sales in the third quarter of 2021 were $17.7 million.

This compares to $19.5 million in the second quarter of 2021 and $15.2 million in the third quarter of 2020. As we have discussed in the past, material buying patterns can vary quarter-to-quarter. Some of the contributing factors include COVID-19 and supply chain issues as well as consumer product demand cycles, capacity ramp schedules, production loading rates, device recipes, product mix, material ordering patterns, customer inventory levels and customer production efficiency gains. Since a number of these factors are moving variables for our customers, they are also moving variables for us. Third quarter 2021, royalty and license fees were $63.9 million.

This compares to $48.2 million in the second quarter of 2021 and $44.6 million in the third quarter of 2020. The third quarter of 2021 Adesis revenues were $4.1 million. This compares to $4 million in the second quarter of 2021 and $3.8 million in the third quarter of 2020. Cost of sales for the third quarter of 2021 were $31.5 million, translating into an overall gross margins of 78%. This compares to $28 million and gross margins of 78% in the second quarter of 2021 and $23.4 million and gross margins of 80% in the third quarter of 2020. Cost of OLED material sales were $28.9 million, translating into material gross margins of 62%. This compares to 67% in the second quarter of 2021 and the comparable year-over-year's quarter material gross margin of 70%.

For the first nine months of the year, our material gross margin was 68%, and our overall gross margin was 80%. As we have noted in the past, gross margins can vary quarter-to-quarter. We expect our overall gross margins to be approximately 80% for the year. Third quarter 2021 operating expense, excluding cost of sales, was $54.4 million compared to last quarter's $51.8 million and a year-over-year comparable quarter of $45.3 million. We are investing in our research and development, including OVJP Corporation, our infrastructure, including our new Shannon site and in our people to fortify our growth opportunities in the organic electronics landscape.

Operating income was $57.7 million in the third quarter of 2021 compared to last quarter's $49.9 million and the year-over-year comparable quarter's operating income of $48.4 million. Operating margin was 40% in the third quarter of 2021 compared to 38% in the second quarter of 2021 and 41% in the third quarter of 2020. And for the first nine months of the year, operating margin was 42%. We believe that we are on track for our operating margin to be in the range of 40% to 45% for the year. Third quarter 2021 income tax rate was 20%. We estimate that our full year tax rate will be approximately 19%, give or take a few basis points. Net income for the third quarter of 2021 was $46.1 million or $0.97 per diluted share. In comparison, net income for both the second quarter of 2021 and third quarter of 2020 was $40.5 million or $0.85 per diluted share.

We ended the quarter with approximately $789 million in cash and equivalents or $16.66 of cash per diluted share. Moving along to guidance. While we are seeing impacts to the consumer electronics ecosystem from the pandemic and component shortages, we continue to expect our 2021 revenues to be in the range of $530 million to $560 million, with a ratio of material to royalty licensing revenues expected to be in the ballpark of 1.5:1. And lastly, our Board of Directors approved a $0.20 quarterly dividend, which will be paid on December 30, 2021, to stockholders of record as of the close of business on December 16, 2021. The dividend reflects our expected continued positive cash flow generation and commitment to return capital to our shareholders. With that, I will turn the call back to Steve.

Steve Abramson -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Thanks, Sid. As we near the end of 2021, we take a moment to reflect on how the pandemic continues to be a profound global disruption, but also how it has tapped into one's resourcefulness, resiliency and resolve. As a corporation of approximately 400 employees spread across 14 locations around the world and participating in a young dynamic market, this pandemic has been an ongoing journey of adapting to constraints and overcoming obstacles. But deepen every trove of challenges are the seeds of opportunity. And at UDC, we have seized those opportunities to continue to build up and bolster our leadership position in the OLED ecosystem and to emerge even stronger to further enable our customers and the OLED industry.

At the heart of the company are our employees and our steadfast commitment to cultivating and nurturing a global culture that celebrates innovation, collaboration, diversity and inclusion. Since our founding, we have taken decisive steps to build a culture that empowers our employees and fosters an environment where they can thrive with inventiveness, ingenuity and problem solving. I am proud of the progress and hard work of UDC's to advance our path forward in building a sustainable and successful future for our company, our customers, our colleagues and our communities.

We look to take this opportunity to thank each of our employees for their drive, desire, dedication and heart in elevating and shaping Universal Display's accomplishments and advancements. We are committed to being a leader in the OLED ecosystem, achieving superior long-term growth and delivering cutting-edge technologies and materials for the industry, for our customers and for our shareholders. And with that, operator, let's start the Q&A.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Our first question is from C.J. Muse with Evercore ISI.

C.J. Muse -- Evercore ISI -- Analyst

Good afternoon, thanks for taking the question. I guess I wanted to, first off, I guess, here, what you're seeing from your third largest customer, it looked like the sales now were roughly half of what at least we expected. So curious, is there inventory digestion there? When will that start to recover? And was that an impact to the material gross margins or per your 10-Q, you highlighted an intro of new red and green emitters. So we would love to hear color there, please?

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

Thanks, C.J. In terms of your question on BOE, which is our third largest customer. The customer ordering patterns can be lumpy for various reasons. In the first quarter of 2021, customer they purchased a significant amount of inventory. And even though their sales are sequentially lower, they had a substantial order in Q1 and pretty much for the year, they are in line with our expectations. And we don't really believe that there's anything different except for normal lumpy inventory purchasing from them.

C.J. Muse -- Evercore ISI -- Analyst

Okay. That's helpful. And then I guess I wanted to as my follow-up, go back to unbilled receivables. Now they came down in the last three months, but you disclosed sort of changes in contractual amendment with clients. So I was hoping you could walk through what exactly is going on there and how we should think about cascading those revenues, I guess, on a positive side in 2022 and whether they're could be any changes that would be headwind to revenues in '22?

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

You're welcome. On unbilled receivables, that is a balance sheet item. It is essentially something that has really no impact on our revenues. We have deferred revenues when we get paid by customers, but that is having to do with the billing when we enter into a new agreement with our customer. So it really is a billing question. It is not a headwind. It is neither a positive or a negative in terms of our revenue recognition because under 606, this has nothing to do with it.

C.J. Muse -- Evercore ISI -- Analyst

Thank you.

Operator

Our next question is from Sidney Ho with Deutsche Bank.

Sidney Ho -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Great, thanks for taking my question. My first question is on the third quarter. I noticed the material sales was kind of flattish, but licensing revenue was up quite a bit, up 30% quarter-over-quarter. So that will make the ratio of material sales and licensing revenue close to 1.2. Just trying to understand why is it so much lower than the 1.5% you expect for the full year? And how should we think about that ratio going forward in Q4? I have a follow-up.

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

Thank you, Sidney. The material royalty license ratio can vary quarter-to-quarter because it really depends upon customer mix. And we -- for the year, we still expect the material royalty licensing revenues to be in the 1.5 to one range.

Sidney Ho -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Is there anything in particular this quarter that drops it to 1.2?

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

No. It really is -- it's customer mix to be perfectly honest.

Sidney Ho -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Okay. Maybe a follow-up question. As the IT market starts adopting OLED displays, can you talk about what's the revenue opportunity per panel or per area, whatever metrics you can use? Are they more like smartphones or TVs on the revenue per areas?

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

Yes. Well, obviously, for us, it is the increase in square inches of plates that are processed than the more square inches of glass is processed, the more the red materials we sell. And these are made similar to what smartphones are made. So it is RGB side-by-side. And the recipes may be a little different for IT than they are for smartphones. But for us, any increase in factory utilization and any new capacity that comes on as a plus for us.

Sidney Ho -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Okay, thank you.

Operator

Our next question is from Krish Sankar with Cowen and Company.

Krish Sankar -- Cowen and Company -- Analyst

Sid, in the past, you have said that the component tightness do not impact you directly. But in the LG Display Elastic said the area shipments declined in September due to component supply issues. So I'm just trying to figure out, are you seeing any derivative impact or maybe to ask a long-winded question, your full year guidance range of $530 million to $560 million, do you think you're going to be in the upper end or lower end based on the tightness because that could imply December quarter could be sequentially up or down in revenue. So I just want to figure out where to think about that?

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

Well, thank you for the question. In terms of the guidance for the year, we have stated that there are -- in recent weeks, there's been a number of companies in the consumer electronics ecosystem that have discussed pandemic and component shortages that impacted Q3 and changed their outlook for Q4. I mean when we put our guidance together in the beginning of the year, we tried to think about all the possible headwinds. And when we did it in February. And based upon everything and based about everything that's occurred, I mean, we're still comfortable with $530 million to $560 million as the revenue range for the year.

Krish Sankar -- Cowen and Company -- Analyst

Can you give any color on sequential growth in December? Or how do you think about revenues?

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

Well, if you look at the fourth quarter, and we reiterated the guidance, as I said, if we talked about first half and second half, and we thought second half would be up. If you look at the low end of 530, it would be up slightly from the first half. And if you look at the upper end of our guidance of 560, then the second half would be up about 12% over the first half.

Krish Sankar -- Cowen and Company -- Analyst

Got it. Got it. And then just a quick follow-up. The increase in inventory in the quarter, is that all primarily due to the purchase of Iridium or is there something else going on?

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

If you look in our 10-Q, you will see that raw materials has grown. It's really in the raw material area. And as we have talked about in the past, we've really tried to manage Iridium so that, a, we never have an uninterrupted supply; and b, trying to average the price that we have that we pay for because during the pandemic, there were real issues in getting it, but we had none.

Operator

Our next question is from Jim Ricchiuti with Needham & Company.

Jim Ricchiuti -- Needham & Company -- Analyst

Just a question on the way the revenues are tracking among your customers. You mentioned that your third biggest customer despite the variability quarter-to-quarter, it's kind of essentially in line with your expectations. Is that true of your other customers, whether your two large customers in Korea? And in general, we're seeing quite a bit of variability from your other customers in China. So I'm trying to get a sense as to how much of that is in line with the way you had been thinking about the business earlier in the year? Or have we seen things change a bit as the market dynamics have changed?

Sidney Ho -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Thanks, Jim. I think that -- when we look at it and the fact that we -- our guidance is exactly what it was in February. I think overall, things are in line with what we thought they would be. And quarter-to-quarter, things do change, just like here we said, the one customer in China in the first quarter brought a lot more, which the percentage went up. But overall, for the year, I think we're pretty much are in the ballpark with all the customers.

Jim Ricchiuti -- Needham & Company -- Analyst

And there have been some reports as it relates to some of the component constraints that there's been some chips that have moved out of tablets and gone into phones, how -- I know you guys are removed from that, but are you seeing any signs of that with any of your customers in terms of changes in some of the applications for the screens? Or are you too far removed from in the food chain?

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

Yes. To be honest, we're pretty far removed from it. We do know that as lots of companies and our customers have reported, all of them are having issues with chips. So we are -- but to answer your question specifically, I don't really don't.

Jim Ricchiuti -- Needham & Company -- Analyst

Okay. And anything in terms of last question, just with respect to to your operating expense looking out at Q4? Is there going to be any change in terms of how either the makeup of the expenses. It sounds like you're continuing to invest fairly heavily in R&D as it relates to some of the newer projects you're working on. But how should we think about R&D expense in Q4?

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

Yes. For the year, we talked about R&D expenses being up by 25%. We expect that all of our expenses to be up 20% to 25% for the year when we gave our guidance. I think we're in that ballpark for the year. So there's nothing that we -- as Steve mentioned, we are focusing on over JP and blue and the R&D expenses are going to go up as we stated. So I don't think there's going to be anything different in Q4 than you've seen in Q3.

Jim Ricchiuti -- Needham & Company -- Analyst

Okay, thank you.

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Our next question is from Shannon Cross with Cross Research.

Shannon Cross -- Cross Research -- Analyst

I was just wondering about inflationary pressures on materials. And just in general, what you're seeing, how you're able to offset it, perhaps what you're doing from an inventory standpoint to try to stay ahead or at least in line with what's going on?

Steve Abramson -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Thanks, Shannon. I mean, we always are looking at ways of looking at our supply chain and trying to ensure that; a, we have a uninterrupted supply, but obviously, we care about cost. And so we've always looked at having multiple sources for the components that go into it. And obviously, we've talked about Iridium because that's commodity and the prices are out there, and you can see what they have done. So we started buying Iridium years ago. So we have some inventory that's a very low price, and we bought it during the whole time. So we have inventory that's a higher price. But I think we really have tried and are doing a pretty good job of managing it. I don't think I can say that I expect inflation to really impact our COGS in the future because everything is going up. I don't believe that to be the case.

Shannon Cross -- Cross Research -- Analyst

Okay. And then I guess, and I apologize if this has been somehow discussed, I had another earnings call today. But I'm just curious, we're starting to see some pretty aggressive pricing moves for OLED TVs and frankly, TVs in general, especially with the higher sizes. Can you just remind us of in the past when prices have come down or you've seen what we're hoping to be a growth in the market, sort of how long it takes? Or when do we start to see the benefit in your numbers versus the market, especially given some of the changes we had in terms of accounting?

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

Yes. Thank you. Well, LG noted on their call that there's strong demand for OLED TVs and talk about eight million TVs this year, there is two fabs, and they initially guided from $7 million to $8 million. They're talking about being at the high end. For us, when the panels get made, it's probably -- I don't know whether it's three months or six months or two months exactly when our material goes in. But clearly, we are in the panel itself, which then if it gets shipped to either LG or a lot of their 18 other customers. So there's no new capacity, but their factory utilization has gone up. So that's where you would see it with us. And then they're supposed to add 30,000 substrate starts so that they can be at 10 million units next year.

Shannon Cross -- Cross Research -- Analyst

Okay, thank you.

Operator

Our next question comes from Regan Tan with Berenberg.

Regan Tan -- Berenberg -- Analyst

I was just wondering, what are the most popular enhancements capabilities that customers have asked for? And can you develop those organically? Or would you need to pursue M&A for that?

Steve Abramson -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Well, we -- thank you for the question. Our R&D teams work closely with our customers. And what they ask for our -- what our performance for our material. They want to -- they're always looking for lifetime or efficiency or color. And so our team works closely with all of our customers. So we do that here. We are the ones that develop the materials we are the ones -- we are the FOLED leader for 25 years, and we will continue to lead the market, but we do all of the FOLED development work in our facility.

Regan Tan -- Berenberg -- Analyst

Great, thank you. I appreciate that.

Operator

Our final question is from Martin Yang with Oppenheimer.

Martin Yang -- Oppenheimer -- Analyst

So I have accounting question regarding your VC investments. Recently, we saw that the DigiLens has raised a new round of probably a higher valuation. How does that impact your financials? Can you maybe give us some more details?

Steve Abramson -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Sure. DigiLens is one of our investments. It's a small investment. And when you look at the investments on our balance sheet, the value of DigiLens is our total investments are under $10 million in that in another company. So right now, that's not going to move the needle. It would be perfectly honest.

Martin Yang -- Oppenheimer -- Analyst

Got it. I have another question also my final question. China, for this quarter, when we see maybe LG and BOE was really strong. What was driving that year-over-year growth?

Steve Abramson -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

I'm sorry, I didn't hear the last part of your question.

Martin Yang -- Oppenheimer -- Analyst

What was driving the year-over-year growth in China when you think about customers that are non-LG and non-BOE?

Steve Abramson -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

I'm sorry, I apologize for not hearing it first. I think clearly, if you look at China, it is BOE, and you've got LG stab there. So as we talked about TVs, they're talking about eight million units, which is the high end. So you're going to see LG's facility in China that is growing and BOE is ramping up its two facilities, and we also have other customers in China which includes Tianma and Visionox. So there is a lot of activity there, and we've talked about it over the last couple of years that we will continue to see growth coming out of China.

Martin Yang -- Oppenheimer -- Analyst

Thank you so much.

Operator

We do have one more question. This is from Nam Kim with Arete Research.

Nam Kim -- Arete Research -- Analyst

There are a lot of news on Mini LED, I guess, in IT space, especially one of the big OEMs pushing aggressively Mini LED on their product. So do you see Mini LED can be comparable to OLED or meaning you just a middle step before OEM adopt OLED later. So any thought or opinion year-end would be great?

Steve Abramson -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Thank you, Nam. I think the customers are working on their recipes and whether or not the same materials or what we will get our customers asking us to design materials that specifically meet their specifications. I think it is something that we are working closely with our customers to make sure that we design new materials to meet their needs or if we have something that meets their needs to make sure that they have it. And...

Nam Kim -- Arete Research -- Analyst

So you think it yes, at the end, so you think Mini LED is kind of a middle step between traditional LCD and OLED. So at the end, OEM probably adopt OLED instead of a Mini LED, is that what you mean?

Steve Abramson -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

I do think that Mini LEDs are, as you're well aware, they're just another backlight technology. And as LG's CTO noted recently on their earnings call, talked about Mini LEDs and Mini LEDs in this quotas, Mini LEDs are nothing more than an LCD with slightly improved backlight. As such, they have the same imitations as limitations as LCDs, such as light leakage and flickering. Therefore, OLEDs are superior to Mini LEDs. And OLED displays are the technology that can realize high-quality and affordable prices. So obviously, just like LG, we are very bullish on OLEDs.

Nam Kim -- Arete Research -- Analyst

Okay, thank you.

Operator

Our next question comes from Brian Lee with Goldman Sachs. Please check if you have your mute feature. Okay. We welcome back to you in a moment. Our next question is from Andrew Abrams with SCMR.

Andrew Abrams -- SCMR -- Analyst

Can I get a little color on your ability to pass on increased cost, meaning Iridium prices? How flexible are your customers in terms of a base price, not a different material, a new enhanced material, but on basically the same material that they were buying six months ago? And second, if you could talk a little bit about the base price for OLED panels that your royalty is based on. Can you give a little color on any changes that you've seen on a gross average coming out of particularly LG Display and how that might affect your royalties in one direction or the other?

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

Thanks, Andy. As we've stated, and I think you're aware, we have said that all of our long-term contracts have pricing built into those contracts. So we don't -- customers want prices to go down, but we have it built in versus -- and we've made want them to go up, but we can't do either one because we have contracts for the materials that when we started the contract that we were selling are built in, whether it's red and green.

So that's not an issue. As we talked about customers when they order new variations of them, they started a different pricing level and work their way down and get cumulative volume discount fulfill. So that's something that we do not have the ability to pass on. Regarding the second part, I can't really talk about details of what is in our royalties. When we do talk about royalties, we talk about a percentage of the ASP of the panel. So if panel pricing goes down, you're going to see less because your percentage is going to be based upon a lower number, but normally on panel pricing goes down because the volumes go up.

Andrew Abrams -- SCMR -- Analyst

Thank you I appreciate it.

Operator

We were having technical difficulties. We once again have Brian Lee with Goldman Sachs.

Brian Lee -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Apologize, if some of these have been asked already. But I guess the first one I had was just on the sales mix this quarter, you had a much higher mix of royalty and license versus materials versus the past couple of quarters. I know a lot of times you talked to the mix of customers as being the reason you see some quarter-to-quarter variation in that, but your top two customers were basically the same percent of sales mix this quarter versus last, but that royalty versus material did shift anything you can speak to there just to give us a sense for what might have driven that?

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

Well, I mean, I think that you are correct. That's what we have stated and that does have the biggest impact on it in customer A and customer B were up and customers see was down in the quarter.

Brian Lee -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Okay. Fair enough. That's a fair point. And then on the materials revenue, and I promise this is my last one, and I'll pass it on. The -- there hasn't been real seasonality this year. I know this is an interesting environment in many regards across different industries. But for you guys, you're almost always accustomed to seeing a decent amount of seasonality in your materials revenue. This year, there's been almost no seasonality. If you look at the kind of 75 to high $70 million revenue run rate you've seen every quarter this year. Is there anything you need -- has anything structurally changed? Would you say in terms of your customers and your customer buying patterns? And then does this translate to Q4 as well? Or what sort of seasonality would you be thinking about here on the material side specifically, as we head into year-end?

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

And we apologize for the problems you're having. But -- it's a difficult question because seasonality is something that isn't exactly -- we're not in a consumer business that is going to have a big lumpy one big hump as you get toward the holidays. But you've heard from other companies in the consumer electronic ecosystem, the pandemic and component shortages have impacted output, and therefore, it's going to affect everybody in the food chain, including us. So in addition to the normal quarter-to-quarter variations in sales, which can be lumpy, as we've talked about, we're going to -- I think we're going to continue to see lumpiness.

Operator

Our next question is a follow-up question from Krish Sankar.

Krish Sankar -- Cowen and Company -- Analyst

I just wanted to ask -- someone asked a Mini LED question. Just want to ask the same question, but your view is not on Mini LED, but MicroLED and QD OLED. I'm kind of curious how you think of it vis-a-vis the OLED opportunity?

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

Yes. Micro LEDs, as you're well aware, they're self-emissive, they're very early stage. And right now, that it is something that you'll see like we've talked about, I think Samsung has a 110-inch MicroLED TV that reportedly has a price tag of $156,000. So there's still a number of unanswered questions and when they actually will get into the market and what market they will address is pretty much stuff that we hear is it will have opportunities if and when it gets into the market for very small and very large displays.

Operator

Thank you. This does conclude the question-and-answer session. I would like to turn the program back to Sid Rosenblatt for any additional or closing remarks.

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

We just want to thank you all for your time tonight. And if you have any follow-ups, please you all know that you can contact us. So everyone, have a good night. Thank you.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Duration: 52 minutes

Call participants:

Darice Liu -- Director of Investor Relations & Corporate Communications

Steve Abramson -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Sid Rosenblatt -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer, Secretary & Director

C.J. Muse -- Evercore ISI -- Analyst

Sidney Ho -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Krish Sankar -- Cowen and Company -- Analyst

Jim Ricchiuti -- Needham & Company -- Analyst

Shannon Cross -- Cross Research -- Analyst

Regan Tan -- Berenberg -- Analyst

Martin Yang -- Oppenheimer -- Analyst

Nam Kim -- Arete Research -- Analyst

Andrew Abrams -- SCMR -- Analyst

Brian Lee -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

More OLED analysis

All earnings call transcripts

AlphaStreet Logo

This article is a transcript of this conference call produced for The Motley Fool. While we strive for our Foolish Best, there may be errors, omissions, or inaccuracies in this transcript. As with all our articles, The Motley Fool does not assume any responsibility for your use of this content, and we strongly encourage you to do your own research, including listening to the call yourself and reading the company's SEC filings. Please see our Terms and Conditions for additional details, including our Obligatory Capitalized Disclaimers of Liability.

The Motley Fool recommends Universal Display. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Premium Investing Services

Invest better with The Motley Fool. Get stock recommendations, portfolio guidance, and more from The Motley Fool's premium services.