Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility

Credit Acceptance Corporation (CACC) Q2 2021 Earnings Call Transcript

By Motley Fool Transcribers – Jul 30, 2021 at 1:32AM

You’re reading a free article with opinions that may differ from The Motley Fool’s Premium Investing Services. Become a Motley Fool member today to get instant access to our top analyst recommendations, in-depth research, investing resources, and more. Learn More

CACC earnings call for the period ending June 30, 2021.

Logo of jester cap with thought bubble.

Image source: The Motley Fool.

Credit Acceptance Corporation (CACC -2.82%)
Q2 2021 Earnings Call
Jul 29, 2021, 5:00 p.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good afternoon, everyone, and welcome to the Credit Acceptance Corporation Second Quarter 2021 Earnings Call. [Operator Instructions] A webcast and transcript of today's earnings call will be made available on Credit Acceptance website.

At this time, I'll now turn the call over to Credit Acceptance's Chief Treasury Officer, Doug Busk. Sir, you may now begin.

10 stocks we like better than Credit Acceptance
When our award-winning analyst team has a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.* 

They just revealed what they believe are the ten best stocks for investors to buy right now... and Credit Acceptance wasn't one of them! That's right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

See the 10 stocks

*Stock Advisor returns as of June 7, 2021

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

Thank you. Good afternoon, and welcome to the Credit Acceptance Corporation Second Quarter 2021 Earnings Call. As you read our news release posted on the Investor Relations section of our website, at ir.creditacceptance.com, and as you listen to this conference call, please recognize that both contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of federal securities law. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control and which could cause actual results to differ materially from such statements. These risks and uncertainties include those spelled out in the cautionary statement regarding forward-looking information included in the news release.

Consider all forward-looking statements in light of those and other risks and uncertainties. Additionally, I should mention that to comply with the SEC's Regulation G, please refer to the financial results section of our news release, which provides tables showing how non-GAAP measures reconcile to GAAP measures. Our results for the quarter include unit and dollar volumes declined 28.7% and 20.5%, respectively, compared to the second quarter of 2020 and increase in forecasted collection rates for loans originated in 2017 through 2021. This resulted in a $104.5 million increase in the forecasted net cash flows from our loan portfolio. Adjusted net income, excluding a onetime reversal of stock compensation expense increased 44% from the second quarter of 2020 to $221.4 million.

Adjusted earnings per share, excluding a onetime reversal of stock compensation expense, increased 53% from the second quarter of 2020 to $13.18. Stack repurchases of approximately 598,000 shares, 3.6% of the shares outstanding at the beginning of the quarter.

At this time, Ken Booth, our Chief Executive Officer; Jay Martin, our Senior Vice President of Finance and Accounting, and I, will take your questions.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] First question is from the line of Moshe Orenbuch from Credit Suisse.

Moshe Orenbuch -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Thanks. Doug, if possible, could you talk a little bit about the $104 million that you said in terms of expected higher collections? And just talk us through how that flows through both on a GAAP and an adjusted basis? Thanks.

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

Yes. I mean, the $104 million was driven by an improvement in the forecasted collection rates on loans originated in recent years. For adjusted accounting purposes, that improvement will be reflected as a yield on the portfolio that will be taken into our financial results on a level yield basis over time. For GAAP, the improvement in forecasted cash flows flows through the provision as a reversal of the provision and adjust the allowance to the point where the net carrying value of the loan asset would equal the present value of the forecasted net cash flows.

Moshe Orenbuch -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Got it. Thanks. And I mean, I just saw -- it's not on your website yet, but I did see on the SEC's website that you filed a 10-Q. So I haven't -- I'm just opening it as we speak. So is there, kind of, any update from the standpoint of the litigation with Massachusetts for the CFPB that we should be aware of?

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

We're -- not really. We have a little bit of updated disclosure in the 10-Q relative to Massachusetts, particularly. We're continuing to work toward finalizing an agreement with the Commonwealth that is consistent with the tentative agreement we came to back in April.

Moshe Orenbuch -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

In that time frame, I guess, it's been just over three months, right, that's kind of on the longer end for one of these. I mean is there anything that we should kind of -- in terms of that process -- the only thing, I guess, we know about it is that you agreed to pay them $27 million. Is there anything else that we should be aware of?

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

I mean, we can't really say anything other than what we've already disclosed. We're continuing to work with the Commonwealth or, as I said, toward an agreement that's consistent with the understanding we reached in April. Beyond that, we can't really say anything.

Moshe Orenbuch -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

And the -- since there's a subsequent CID from the CFPB in June, you had had -- just been kind of ongoing for a period of time. Anything different in what they're asking for that we should know about?

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

I can't really comment beyond what's in the 10-Q.

Moshe Orenbuch -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Got it. Alright. Thank you.

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

Thanks, Moshe.

Operator

Next question is from the line of Ray Cheesman of Anfield Capital.

Ray Cheesman -- Anfield Group -- Analyst

Thank you. Doug, I wanted to ask you guys, with COVID cranking back up again and being very topical and, of course, later this week, unless something changes, the eviction and foreclosure moratorium is kind of running out. Is it your expectation that just like the last two times kind of early in the pandemic and then kind of over that kind of extended Christmas quiet period, do you think there's a risk of another quiet period if the customer base is impacted by either a fear of the disease or fear of making rent payments?

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

When you're referring to a quiet period, what specifically are you referring to?

Ray Cheesman -- Anfield Group -- Analyst

I'm thinking the decline in business that occurred over the winter.

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

Certainly possible. I mean, it's -- I don't think many things in this pandemic have played out as anyone would have thought. So I think there's uncertainty into how things will progress from here. So anything is possible.

Ray Cheesman -- Anfield Group -- Analyst

Second question would be, I think that I've been watching the Manheim get a little soft or possibly even roll over here. Does that mean your optimism for the future might go up if it doesn't cost an arm and a leg to get a used car in the future and maybe more people can afford one?

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

Yes. I mean, I think that would be helpful. As we pointed out in our earnings release, I think used cars prices being at elevated levels have presented challenges for our customer base. So that would likely be helpful.

Ray Cheesman -- Anfield Group -- Analyst

Okay. And then just a last one. I mean, you and a lot of other financial institutions were beneficiaries of CECL reserve releases during this particular reporting period. And I'm wondering, is there a chance that there's more reserve releases this year to come? Or do you guys feel like you've got your arms around the best information right here and now?

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

I mean, we adjust our forecasted collection rates every month. And that adjustment is based primarily on how the loans actually perform versus our expectations. So if loan performance continues to exceed, which is far from certain, then there will be additional provision reversals. And if loan performance declines, then the opposite will occur. That would be incremental provision. So it's just all a function of how the loans perform.

Ray Cheesman -- Anfield Group -- Analyst

Okay. Thank you very much.

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Next question is from the line of Rob Wildhack of Autonomous Research.

Rob Wildhack -- Autonomous Research -- Analyst

Hi. In the press release, you attributed the slowdown in this quarter's unit volumes to reduced inventories and higher used car prices. Inventories have been depressed and used car prices have been elevated for some time now, though. So I'm wondering if there's anything else that might have contributed to the deceleration in this particular quarter?

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

Nothing in particular. I think that from our understanding, both the used car prices, especially for our segment of the market, and inventory levels got incrementally worse during the quarter. So I think that was, as we say, the most significant contributing factor. The other thing is, as I look at the industry data, which we only have through May, it seems like we lost a bit of share in the quarter. So that would be a contributing factor as well.

Rob Wildhack -- Autonomous Research -- Analyst

Okay. Do you have a hypothesis for why you might have lost share in the quarter?

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

The most likely explanations would be I think that the inventory challenges have been more significant with independent dealers. As you know, we get the majority of our originations from independents. And then I think that there's probably some reluctance on behalf of dealers, given the scarcity of inventory to finance a loan with Credit Acceptance and given that the upfront gross is less than it would be with one of their traditional lenders. So we've gotten feedback that some dealers given the scarcity of inventory are electing not to finance that consumer and waiting for a higher credit quality by order of coming to the lot.

Rob Wildhack -- Autonomous Research -- Analyst

Okay. Thanks. And I appreciate that you can't comment on the lawsuit in Massachusetts or the settlement there. But wondering if you could comment on your business in Massachusetts. Has there been any noticeable change in volumes or dealer relationships since you announced the preliminary settlement?

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

Nothing significant.

Rob Wildhack -- Autonomous Research -- Analyst

Okay. Thank you.

Operator

Next question is again from the line of Ray Cheesman of Anfield Capital.

Ray Cheesman -- Anfield Group -- Analyst

I just had a quick follow-up. There is an awful lot of capital out there that is chasing loans. And often, people are being a little bit crazy to get volume. And you mentioned market share a minute ago. I'm wondering if you're seeing any disruptive players disturbing the market where you service your customers?

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

Well, you're certainly right that the more capital that the industry has access to, the more competitive it tends to be. I don't really have any particular insight into the business practices of others in the industry. So I can't provide a good answer to your question, Ray.

Ray Cheesman -- Anfield Group -- Analyst

But your market share, it's not because you feel like somebody is trying to dramatically undercut the kind of rational rate that should be charged for the risk that's assumed?

Kenneth S. Booth -- Chief Executive Officer

It's really hard to say. I mean there's lots of participants in the market, we price our business to try to maximize the economic profit, we try to make an acceptable return and when we forecast collections for. So, I guess, we've kind of looked at it from our perspective. We're disappointed that volume is down, but we view this kind of as a temporary situation. How long it lasts, we don't really know. But we think the market will stabilize at some point. We feel good about the business that we're writing.

Ray Cheesman -- Anfield Group -- Analyst

Thank you very much.

Operator

[Operator Instructions] With no further questions in the queue, I'll now turn the conference back over to Mr. Busk for any additional or closing remarks.

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

We would like to thank everyone for their support and for joining us on our conference call today. If you have any additional follow-up questions, please direct them to our Investor Relations mailbox at [email protected] We look forward to talking to you again next quarter. Thank you.

Operator

[Operator closing remarks]

Duration: 15 minutes

Call participants:

Douglas W. Busk -- Chief Treasury Officer

Kenneth S. Booth -- Chief Executive Officer

Moshe Orenbuch -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Ray Cheesman -- Anfield Group -- Analyst

Rob Wildhack -- Autonomous Research -- Analyst

More CACC analysis

All earnings call transcripts

AlphaStreet Logo

This article is a transcript of this conference call produced for The Motley Fool. While we strive for our Foolish Best, there may be errors, omissions, or inaccuracies in this transcript. As with all our articles, The Motley Fool does not assume any responsibility for your use of this content, and we strongly encourage you to do your own research, including listening to the call yourself and reading the company's SEC filings. Please see our Terms and Conditions for additional details, including our Obligatory Capitalized Disclaimers of Liability.

The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Stocks Mentioned

Credit Acceptance Stock Quote
Credit Acceptance
CACC
$460.83 (-2.82%) $-13.36

*Average returns of all recommendations since inception. Cost basis and return based on previous market day close.

Related Articles

Premium Investing Services

Invest better with The Motley Fool. Get stock recommendations, portfolio guidance, and more from The Motley Fool's premium services.