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Continental Building Products (NYSE:CBPX)
Q1 2019 Earnings Call
May. 02, 2019, 5:00 p.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:


Operator

Thank you for standing by. This is the conference operator. Welcome to the Continental Building Products' first-quarter 2019 earnings conference call. As a reminder, all participants are in listen-only mode, and the conference is being recorded.

After the presentation, there'll be an opportunity to start to ask questions. [Operator instructions] I would now like to turn the conference over to Rodny Nacier, investor relations. Please go ahead.

Rodny Nacier -- Investor Relations

Thank you for joining us today for Continental Building Products' first-quarter 2019 earnings conference call. I am joined by Chief Executive Officer Jay Bachmann and Chief Financial Officer Dennis Schemm. Before we begin, I'd like to remind you management's remarks and answers to your questions may contain forward-looking statements as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements address matters that are subject to risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ from those discussed today.

Examples of forward-looking statements include statements regarding our industry, business strategy and expected performance such as expectations with respect to revenue, gross margin, operating income and cash flow, as well as non-GAAP financial measures such as adjusted EBITDA. These statements, which may occur during our prepared remarks or during the question-and-answer session, may be identified by words such as expect, should, anticipate, intends, estimates, believes or similar expressions that are used in connection with any discussion of future financial and operating performance. Forward-looking statements represent management's expectations, current estimates in light of currently available information, and the company assumes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements in the future. Forward-looking statements are subject to uncertainty, and we encourage you to review the company's past and future filings with the SEC, including, without limitation, the company's Form 10-K and 10-Qs, which identify the specific factors that may cause actual results or events to differ in a material way from those described in those forward-looking statements.

In addition, during this call, certain financial performance measures may be discussed that differ from comparable measures contained in our financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles referred to by the Securities and Exchange Commission as non-GAAP financial measures. We believe these non-GAAP financial measures assist management and investors in evaluating our performance and preparing period-to-period results of operations in a more meaningful and consistent manner as discussed in greater detail in our earnings release. Our earnings release also includes a reconciliation of these measures.

With that, I'll turn the call over to Jay.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Rodny. Good afternoon everyone, and thank you for joining us today for our first-quarter 2019 earnings call. Today I will discuss our strategy, operating highlights and business activity. Dennis will then discuss additional details on our financial results, balance sheet and outlook.

After our prepared remarks, we will open up the call for your questions. We began 2019 with a keen focus on safety, putting our customers first and driving continuous improvement as part of our Bison Way. Dedication to these fundamental operating principles continues to drive a learning organization that places significant value on best serving our customers. Our approach also continues to produce strong operating and financial results, as evident in our first-quarter performance in which we increased volumes 5.5% to 649 million square feet, generated a 17% improvement in net income to $16 million and delivered a 25% lift in EPS to $0.45.

We were able to deliver these results while overcoming the temporary outage at our Buchanan plant, which speaks to the resilience of our organization. I would like to thank: our associates who worked so diligently to restart the Buchanan facility, our associates at our other plants that increased production to service our customers, and I would like to thank our customers for their understanding and support. We successfully resolved the outage. Plant has been up and running since March 15, and we have returned to full service with our customers.

We estimate $4 million to $5 million of lost profits associated with this outage and expect to record this amount in a future quarter once we finalize the business interruption claim with our insurance carrier. As we have demonstrated since 2015, we continue to return value to shareholders through our share repurchase program. Year to date, we repurchased $19 million in shares, with $5 million being repurchased in the first quarter. We continue to buy back our stock while also investing in our highly successful continuous improvement measures and high-return capital spending.

Year to date, we deployed $5.6 million on high-return capital projects and are on track to realize an incremental $3 million in savings associated with these projects in 2019. We are also excited to continue our mission to invest back into our communities where our associates live and work. Over the past several years, we have demonstrated this commitment through donating wallboard to local charities and contributing funds for national disaster relief efforts. Our latest investment is with Susan G.

Komen in the fight against breast cancer, something that has touched many families of the Continental team, along with our customers. Beginning in the summer of 2019, Continental will be a sponsor for Susan G. Komen and will contribute a portion of our sales for weather defense exterior sheating. We look forward to this partnership and the role we can play to help find a cure for this disease that will impact one in eight women during their lifetime.

Turning to operating metrics. Our total mill net for the quarter was down 1% versus prior year, and we exited the quarter at approximately $149 per MSF. Helped by the March price increase, we have seen pricing steady out in April compared to the end of March. Our volumes in the first quarter were up 6% year over year.

Our strongest market continues to be the southeast, propelled by new residential construction and solid economic growth. In recent conversations with our customers, they remain overall positive on construction trends and see lower mortgage interest rates and a shift to entry-level housing by homebuilders as supportive of growth. This sentiment matches up with what we are seeing in repair and remodel and commercial activity, where we continue to expect a trend of steady construction growth. With new housing starts in the past 12 months remaining well below the 40-year long-term historical average, we believe we still have a long runway for higher sales of our products.

In summary, the strong performance that we saw during the quarter is a direct result of the resilience of our associates executing across our strategy of safety, exceptional customer service and continuous improvement through the Bison Way. We believe we have a strong position to maintain our balance sheet and continue to generate significant cash flows with our highly efficient, low-cost assets, along with our operational rigor and discipline. This will allow us to deliver industry-leading margins, invest those cash flows back into our business and our associates and return value to our shareholders. I am positive on the direction that we are heading and look forward to the upcoming year.

I will now turn the call over to Dennis to provide additional details on our financial results, balance sheet and outlook.

Dennis Schemm -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Jay, and good afternoon to everyone on the line. I will first detail results for the quarter and provide some comments on the balance sheet and liquidity, and I will conclude by providing some additional perspective for the full-year 2019. Net sales increased by 4.5% to $122 million on higher volumes as compared to first-quarter 2018, primarily due to timing associated with the prior-year pre-buy in December of 2017. Mill net price saw a decline of 1.4% to $149.48 and a sequential decline of 3.1% when compared to the fourth quarter of 2018.

Gross margin in the quarter was essentially flat at 25.6% as compared to the prior-year quarter of 25.8%, mainly due to higher freight. In the quarter, we saw low single-digit increases in freight and gypsum costs per unit, which were partially offset by lower OCC and energy costs. Looking forward, we now expect unit costs per square foot to increase in the range of 2% to 3%. This is lower than our previously communicated range of 4.5% to 6.5%, given more favorable OCC and energy costs.

We are on track to realize the $3 million in savings from our high-return capital investments that we are making in our plant network and across the business that are helping to mitigate some of these higher costs. SG&A as a percentage of net sales improved to 7.9%, compared to 8.1% in the prior quarter, benefiting from disciplined control of overhead costs and lower incentive and stock compensation. Adjusted EBITDA increased 2.5% to $32.1 million. While adjusted EBITDA in the first-quarter 2019 excludes a $1.5-million gain from insurance recoveries, it did not reflect lost sales associated with the Buchanan outage.

We continue to work closely with our insurance advisors and carrier to calculate the lost sales associated with the Buchanan outage, and we currently anticipate that the lost EBITDA in the first quarter was in the range of $4 million to $5 million, representing 140 to 170 basis points of loss margin. We expect this $4 million to $5 million to result in an EBITDA benefit in a future quarter when the cash payment is received. Interest expense decreased 8.4% to $2.5 million, compared to $2.7 million in the prior-year quarter, reflecting lower average outstanding borrowings during first-quarter 2019 compared to first-quarter 2018 due to the partial debt transfer to internal revenue bonds in Q4 2018, additional interest income and lower spreads related to debt repricing. This decrease in interest expense in the quarter was partially offset by a rise in LIBOR.

First-quarter 2019 effective tax rate was 22.4%, compared to 22.2% for the first-quarter 2018 and in line with expectations. Moving to the balance sheet and liquidity. On March 31, 2019, we had cash on hand of $101.1 million, total debt of $268.2 million and $73.6 million of availability on the credit facility. During the quarter, we generated $10.6 million in cash flow from operations and invested $7.4 million of capital assets, of which $1.8 million related to the Buchanan outage.

During the first quarter, we purchased approximately 192,000 shares of common stock with an aggregate value of $5 million. And after the close of the quarter, through May 1st, we have purchased another 561,000 shares for $14.3 million for a year-to-date total of $19.3 million, or 753,000 shares. As we move forward, the repurchase program of $300 million provides us with approximately $112 million remaining availability. During the quarter, we made mandatory principal payments on our debt of $700,000.

Our leverage ratio continues to remain strong of 1.08 times. We are very pleased with this operational and financial progress. The solid improvement is a direct reflection of the company's effective operating strategy, reliable execution and low-cost efficient assets. I will now provide some select details of insurance claims and cash payments related to the Buchanan outage.

Our total claim is in the range of $9 million to $10 million. We have collected $4.3 million quarter to date net of our $250,000 deductible. Our claim can be segmented across three elements, including first, the asset rebuild; second, direct costs associated with the business interruption; and third, estimated lost EBITDA associated with lost sales from the plant outage. On the asset rebuild, our claim was $1.8 million and we received $1.6 million from the insurance carrier, which is net of the $250,000 deductible.

On the direct costs associated with the business interruption, our claim was for $2.9 million, and we received $2.7 million from the insurance carrier and recorded a $271,000 receivable. On the estimated lost EBITDA associated with lost sales from business interruption, our claim is for $4 million to $5 million. We continue to work with our insurance carrier, and we'll record this amount once it is finalized with our carrier. I will now provide some select insight regarding expectations for the full-year 2019.

SG&A is expected to be in the range of $39 million to $41 million, down from the previous range of $40 million to $42 million. Cost of goods sold on a per-unit basis is expected to increase in the range of 2% to 3%, down from the previously estimated range of 4.5% to 6.5%. We expect to partly offset increases in cost of goods sold by approximately $3 million of savings from high-return investments. Total capital expenditures are expected to be in the range of $30 million to $34 million.

The increase from our prior range surely reflects the $1.8 million incurred as a result of the Buchanan outage. Our other CAPEX assumptions remain unchanged. Routine maintenance capital spending is expected to be approximately $14 million to $16 million. High-return capital spending is expected to be in the range of $14 million to $16 million.

Depreciation and amortization is expected to be in the range of $43 million to $45 million, and the effective tax rate is expected to be in the range of 22% to 23%, up from the previous range of 21% to 22%. We expect our volumes to be in line with industry wallboard volume growth of low single digits for the full-year 2019, including the estimated 40 million to 50 million square feet lost during the Buchanan outage. In summary, we continue to execute our key fundamentals, fight cost increases through strict controllable cost discipline, which continues to allow us to deliver high returns to investors and strengthen our balance sheet. We look forward to the remainder of the year as we continue to drive outstanding shareholder return.

Thank you again for joining us today. Operator, we are now ready to take any questions.

Questions & Answers:


Operator

Thank you. We'll now begin the question-and-answer session. [Operator instructions] Our first question is from Matthew Bouley from Barclays. Please go ahead.

Matthew Bouley -- Barclays -- Analyst

Hi. Good afternoon, and thank you for taking my question. I guess I wanted to start out on the volume side. So if we add back that 40 million to 50 million, I guess, square feet lost with the outage that, Dennis, you just mentioned, it seems to imply kind of mid-teens volume growth, I guess underlying that.

So I mean, am I thinking about that correctly? And if so, kind of what do you attribute that share gain to? And what's the likelihood that that can persist? Thank you.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Sure. So this is Jay. If you take a look and add that back, you're somewhere in that 13% range of an increase when you add back what we lost with Buchanan being down. And so relative to North America, you're right, that North America growth under the Gypsum Association numbers was about 10%.

The reality is you have to look at really our footprint, which is primarily east of the Mississippi. That net growth there was more in the 14% range. So if you look at what we grew with, including that volume with the outage relative to our core markets, we're right in line.

Matthew Bouley -- Barclays -- Analyst

OK, that's perfect. I appreciate that detail. And on the pricing side, given you're seeing the residential market perhaps recovering slightly, would you say that there's potential for a second price increase this year? Or does 2019 kind of look like what we had seen in years prior to 2018? Thank you.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Sure. So right now, our focus is still is, we've gotten this first pricing increase in place. It's helped to steady things out, which are good. We'll first have to talk with our customers as to what the next, next steps might be.

Obviously it will take volume. So if you take a look at, you're right, housing is starting to get better again. Depending on how volumes go, we'll see then what pricing we do.

Operator

The next question is from Trey Grooms with Stephens, Inc. Please go ahead.

Trey Grooms -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Hey, good afternoon.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Good afternoon.

Trey Grooms -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

So could you, I guess for my question, just kind of talk about, I mean, a plus 13, well, excluding the Buchanan, and that's very strong and a little bit right in line I guess with your markets, as you mentioned; can you talk about how volume kind of trended during the quarter? And any commentary on what you're seeing out there in April? I know there were some timing differences with pre-buy and those types of things, but just the underlying demand and kind of what you're seeing in April.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Sure. So if you look at the demand, I mean, certainly, the impact of the higher volumes in first-quarter 2019 was that if you look at first-quarter 2018, the net-based comparison was very favorable because the pre-buy had really occurred last year in the fourth quarter of 2017. So that's why you're seeing a very favorable volume trend in the quarter. Underlying growth, if you took that pre-buy and made it all equal, it's probably more in the 5% range for the industry.

As you go into April, I say volumes are pretty steady relative to what they were in April last year. So again, when you take a look at our forecast of low single digits for the year, we're right on track with that low single digits for the year.

Trey Grooms -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

OK, got you. So that outlook for low single digits, that's inclusive of the abnormally favorable conditions in the 1Q due to the timing?

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

It is. So we're looking truly at that one-year basis, how does '19 compare to '18 for the industry? And that takes into consideration the larger volume that you saw in the first quarter overall.

Trey Grooms -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Got it. OK. Thanks a lot. Thanks for taking my questions.

I'll turn it over.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

The next question is from Garik Shmois with Longbow Research. Please go ahead.

Jeff Stevenson -- Longbow Research -- Analyst

Hi, this is Jeff Stevenson on for Garik, and I just had a question on pricing. Did you see any mix impact in the first quarter with the Buchanan outage with kind of more going to the southeast volumes instead of the higher priced north?

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

So from a mixed impact, it was minimal. And part of that is we really did a lot from a logistics side still to service our customers in the northeast. So certainly, we could not service them all the way we wanted to, but there were a lot of moves that we did between truck and rail to go ahead and continue to be able to serve that market. So when we looked at it, mix and the overall impact, it was actually pretty nominal.

Jeff Stevenson -- Longbow Research -- Analyst

OK. Thank you.

Operator

The next question is from Mike Dahl with RBC Capital Markets. Please go ahead.

Mike Dahl -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

Hi, thanks for taking my questions. I wanted to follow up also on, good afternoon, on pricing. And just around the increase, because I think this was a year where you had a variety of different dates out there among the producers, and it seems like at least one may have shifted dates and you've had price kind of slip sequentially into when the pricing should have gone effective. Can you just speak a little more to what you're seeing in terms of the competitive dynamics and the overall kind of pricing environment and the increases or the pricing through the quarter?

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Sure. Sure, Mike. When you take a look at, I mean, you still obviously have competitive dynamics out there. You saw some of that movement then occur within the quarter.

Again, the nice thing is as things got into March, and with that increase being put in, it did help stabilize things. And that's why when we looked at April in terms of that exit price of March that I gave into April, how it steadied out there, that makes me feel better as we look into what has happened there.

Mike Dahl -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

OK, got it. That's helpful. I'm sorry if I missed that comment. The second question just around the cost breakdown.

It's good to see that the inflation is coming under control and you're offsetting some of that as well. I was just curious if you break down kind of the change from the 4.5 to 6 down to the 2 to 3. Can you give us the buckets of what changed the most versus your prior internal expectations?

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Hey, Mike. Sure. So what really is driving the decrease is lower OCC. And so I think that had the most significant impact on the range.

We also are experiencing lower energy costs as well. So those are the two primary drivers. Just to be clear though, we continue to experience inflation on the freight side. We experienced it on the labor side.

And then also, we're experiencing it on the freight component related to gypsum.

Mike Dahl -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

OK. And just final, just a clean up from me. The insurance gain that you're expected to record of $4 million to $5 million in one of the next couple of quarters, just to be clear, unlike the gain that was backed out of adjusted EBITDA this quarter, that's something you would record as part of adjusted EBITDA, correct?

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

That is correct, Mike. Absolutely correct. The $1.8 million, or sorry the $1.5 million that we backed out, we believe that was more of a one-time gain related to that asset that we put on the books. So we removed that.

This $4 million to $5 million that we expect to get from our insurance carrier, that will be included in adjusted EBITDA.

Mike Dahl -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

Great, thank you.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

You're welcome.

Operator

[Operator instructions] The next question is from Scott Schrier with Citi. Please go ahead.

Scott Schrier -- Citi -- Analyst

Hi, good afternoon. Thanks for taking my question. I wanted to ask a little bit about your business over the long term. If you can speak to the feasibility and the cost if you were so inclined to convert to handling natural gypsum and more on that long term, how do you view given the fundamentals in your cash flow, the potential for either larger scale growth whether in wallboard, be it a plant or network or adjacent high-margin building products segment? Thank you.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Sure. So I guess, when you look from a gypsum side, I mean, the reality is between the primary contracts we have, the secondary contracts we have. We do have the ability to bring in natural gypsum finds to our plants also. I mean, all those things surely means that the supply is there and we're doing that today.

So when you take a look at it from a cost side, that's again already happening today. And you can see, in terms of our margins, that we're still able to generate very good margins as we stretch a little bit farther in order to get those secondary supplies. So between the contracts we have and the infrastructure we have in place, I feel very good about where we are, the supplies we have and the cost of those supplies. Beyond that, when I take a look at your next question on the other investment, really gets back to what do we want to do from a shareholder value side? We've been very focused obviously on high-return CAPEX, reinvesting back into the business.

Very focused on share repurchases. Certainly, we're always looking at ways for how we can best generate returns for our shareholders, and we'll continue to do that.

Operator

The next question is from Reuben Garner with Seaport Global Securities. Please go ahead.

Reuben Garner -- Seaport Global Securities -- Analyst

Thank you, good afternoon everyone.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Hey, Reuben.

Reuben Garner -- Seaport Global Securities -- Analyst

So maybe just a follow up on the pre-buy comment. If I'm doing the math right, it sounds like pre-buy was maybe as much as 45 million or 50 million feet. That sounds higher than years past. Does that tell us anything about what the market is expecting from a pricing standpoint? And then maybe on the same note, it looked like your inventory was up a little bit year over year.

Can you just talk about your inventory and the inventory in the channel and kind of connect all those dots for us? How does the inventory look to you?

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

So I'll have Dennis talk about inventory. I guess just be careful, Reuben, on the pre-buy. When we talk about the normalization, we are looking at in Q4 2017 is when you had a lot more buying happening then in advance of the January 1, 2018 price increase, which is why your baseline comparison of first-quarter 2018 is lower. And I think we said, oh, somewhere in that 30-million-square-foot range for us of what that impact was from a lower base going into 2018.

Very limited pre-buy I would say if you look at 2019 first quarter.

Dennis Schemm -- Chief Financial Officer

That's correct. And so from an inventory perspective, we were a little bit higher in Q1. That was mainly because of the Buchanan outage. And so we had more raw materials sitting with us because we continued to bring in paper, bring in other supplies, knowing that the plant was going to be back up and running.

So that's really the main driver.

Reuben Garner -- Seaport Global Securities -- Analyst

Thanks guys. And if I could sneak in just one clarification, did I hear you, did you give the exit price for the quarter, what it was in March so we can know what, I guess, the stabilization level is or the starting point for Q2?

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Sure. So the mill net was at $149 per MSF.

Dennis Schemm -- Chief Financial Officer

$149.50.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

$149.50.

Operator

The next question is from Phil Ng with Jefferies. Please go ahead.

Phil Ng -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Hey guys. I guess more big picture, the wallboard industry is pretty fragmented. What's your view on further consolidation in the industry and your appetite to kind of participate on the M&A front and lever up at this point in the cycle?

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes, you can imagine we're not going to talk about individual types of deals or anything like that. Certainly, for us, we always look at what's the best way we can create value for the shareholder? So a lot of the focus has been, again, on the investments we're making in the business, the share repurchases. Obviously, we're always looking at what is the best thing to do for the shareholders as a way to generate those returns. So we'll continue to look at that.

Dennis Schemm -- Chief Financial Officer

And relative to the leverage ratio, right? We are real comfortable being right around that 1, 1.1 times, and so that's where we're going to be focused on.

Phil Ng -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Got it. And given one of your bigger competitors, USG, changing hands now, it's owned by a private entity, what's your view on any impact for the better or worse from the competitive landscape going forward? Thanks.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

You're right. Again, when I take a look at what's out there in the market right now, I don't see really any anomalies. You have obviously, in essence, the same competitors that are still going after one another. And so just because you have a change in ownership there, frankly from our side, we're still competing against all of them equally.

Phil Ng -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Thanks a lot.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Dennis Schemm -- Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Phil.

Operator

The next question is from Keith Hughes with SunTrust. Please go ahead.

Keith Hughes -- SunTrust Robinson Humphrey -- Analyst

Thank you. Building on the inventory question earlier, do you expect, given your comment on raw materials, do you expect to be producing at the rate of demand? So in other words, there's no kind of plan, excuse me, any planned downtime in the second quarter?

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

So when you look at our inventories, actually what's been building is more on the raw material side. And now, in terms of storage and all that, we really don't have issues with that. On the finished goods side, we have very limited space anyways, Keith. So normally we can have anywhere from, depending on the plant, anywhere from one to two, maybe three weeks of some of the inventory on stock.

And so you'll find that there's not a lot of finished goods that can store up over the course of any any month.

Keith Hughes -- SunTrust Robinson Humphrey -- Analyst

OK. And you had [Inaudible] quarter last year, you had some really strong volumes as part of the whole pre-buy thing that went on. Do you think that's similar to the rest of the industry? Or is your number a little unique?

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

So I know last year the pre-buy, so in 2017 is when the pre-buy occurred for the January 1, 2018 price increase. If I remember correctly, the industry as a whole was impacted with that, which is why you're seeing Q1 2019 so much higher from an industry side, particularly in the east, when I compare those numbers relative to what the industry did first-quarter 2018, which was pretty low as people were burning off inventory.

Keith Hughes -- SunTrust Robinson Humphrey -- Analyst

OK, thank you.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

The next question is from Josh Wilson with Raymond James. Please go ahead.

Josh Wilson -- Raymond James -- Analyst

Good afternoon, Jay and Dennis. Thanks for all the color and good work in a tough quarter.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Josh.

Josh Wilson -- Raymond James -- Analyst

Could you break out what the percentage of the cost of goods was specifically, the transportation costs, and give us a little more color on what you're seeing in the inflation trends there going forward?

Dennis Schemm -- Chief Financial Officer

Yes. From the overall cost of goods, up 25% of our cost were directly related to freight. And so again, that's an outbound freight number, not inbound. That's outbound freight.

And essentially, as we move forward through the year, I would expect some of that inflation that we've seen to moderate somewhat going into the second half as we lap what we experienced last year.

Josh Wilson -- Raymond James -- Analyst

Got it. Thanks.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

And the last question is from Nishu Sood with Deutsche Bank. Please go ahead.

Unknown speaker

Hi, this is actually Mark [Sp] for Nishu. Thank you for taking my question.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Unknown speaker

Yes, thank you. On the 40 to 50 lost volume, is that a net number of the volume that you were able to make up at the Silver Grove plant? Or is it the gross number?

Dennis Schemm -- Chief Financial Officer

So just to make sure, so this-- we believe we would have been able to sell had the plant not had an outage. So this would be, in my mind, incremental volume to what we reported here in Q1.

Unknown speaker

OK, but you also ran your Silver Grove plant at a higher run rate to make up for some of the lost volume, right?

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Correct. So both Silver Grove and even Palatka. We went ahead and leaned on those plants, had them run more as a way to still service our customers in the Northeast as best we could. Even with that though, we were still short 40 million to 50 million square feet that we are now working with our insurance carrier to get covered for.

Because that's in essence the lost profits associated with those volumes.

Unknown speaker

And did you incur higher costs, like overtime, for example, at the other plant?

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

We absolutely did. We incurred higher cost in overtime. But predominantly, right, those higher costs were felt with freight. So shipping product further from Silver Grove, from Palatka into the northeast and mid-Atlantic markets.

And so freight was the primary driver of the incremental cost.

Unknown speaker

And are those costs part of the insurance proceeds or--

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

So to date, we submitted a claim for $2.9 million of incremental costs. We received back already from our insurance carrier $2.7 million. So we have an outstanding receivable for about $300,000 from the insurance carrier for the remainder of those incremental costs. We have a great table in our press release that really lines out the impact of the Buchanan outage.

Unknown speaker

Great, thanks. Appreciate it. Thank you.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Oh, you're welcome.

Dennis Schemm -- Chief Financial Officer -- Analyst

Thank you.

Operator

This concludes the question-and-answer session. I would like to turn the conference back over to Jay Bachmann for any closing remarks.

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you very much for joining us, and I look forward to speaking with you on our next call here in another quarter. Thank you.

Operator

[Operator signoff]

Duration: 41 minutes

Call participants:

Rodny Nacier -- Investor Relations

Jay Bachmann -- Chief Executive Officer

Dennis Schemm -- Chief Financial Officer

Matthew Bouley -- Barclays -- Analyst

Trey Grooms -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Jeff Stevenson -- Longbow Research -- Analyst

Mike Dahl -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

Scott Schrier -- Citi -- Analyst

Reuben Garner -- Seaport Global Securities -- Analyst

Phil Ng -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Keith Hughes -- SunTrust Robinson Humphrey -- Analyst

Josh Wilson -- Raymond James -- Analyst

Unknown speaker

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