Empire State Realty Trust Inc (ESRT) Q2 2019 Earnings Call Transcript

ESRT earnings call for the period ending June 30, 2019.

Motley Fool Transcribers
Motley Fool Transcribers
Jul 25, 2019 at 4:23PM
Other
Logo of jester cap with thought bubble.

Image source: The Motley Fool.

Empire State Realty Trust Inc (NYSE:ESRT)
Q2 2019 Earnings Call
Jul 25, 2019, 8:30 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Greetings and welcome to the Empire State Realty Trust Second Quarter 2019 Earnings Call [Operator Instructions]. I would now like to turn the conference over to your host, Mr. Greg Faje, Director of Investor Relations for Empire State Realty Trust. Thank you. You may begin.

Greg Faje -- Director of Investor Relations

Good morning. Thank you for joining us today for Empire State Realty Trust Second Quarter 2019 Earnings Conference Call. In addition to the press release distributed last evening, a quarterly supplemental package with further detail on our results and our latest investor presentation have been posted in the Investors section of the company's website at empirestaterealtytrust.com. On today's call, management's prepared remarks and answers to your questions may contain forward-looking statements, as defined in applicable securities laws, including those related to market conditions, property operations, capital expenditures, income and expense.

As a reminder, forward-looking statements represent management's current estimates, they are subject to risks and uncertainties, which may cause actual results to differ from those discussed today. Empire State Realty Trust assumes no obligation to update any forward-looking statement in the future. We encourage listeners to review the more detailed discussions related to these forward-looking statements in the company's filings with the SEC.

Finally, during today's call, we will discuss certain non-GAAP financial measures, such as FFO, modified and core FFO, NOI, cash NOI and EBITDA, which we believe are meaningful in evaluating the company's performance. The definitions and reconciliations of these measures to the most directly comparable GAAP measures are included in the earnings release and supplemental package, each available on the company's website. Now I will turn the call over to John Kessler, President and Chief Operating Officer.

John Kessler -- President and Chief Operating Officer

Good morning and thank you, Greg. Welcome to our Second Quarter 2019 Earnings Conference Call. At Empire State Realty Trust, though it is not that popular these days, we are a New York City focused office and retail REIT with fully modernized assets, central locations and easy access to mass transit. Our four drivers of growth deliver embedded upside and peer leading cash leasing spreads. Our portfolio is well positioned price between Trophy Class A and Class B properties to outperform in any market. We have a fortress balance sheet with significant cash, undrawn line of credit, and low leverage, and we are an industry leader in sustainability and energy efficiency.

Today, Tom Durels will speak about the second quarter's approximately 261,000 square feet of leases, market demand for our properties, and our market leading -- leasing spreads. For our discussion of financial performance and our balance sheet, we will hear from Greg Faje. As we all know from our prior filing, our CFO, David Karp's last day is a week from today and David is here with us and has signed off on all our numbers for the quarter. As part of our transition plan going forward, Greg will be our lead with investors and analysts, and he will report to me, and today he assumes David's prepared remarks for the call.

Then David will say a few words. And finally, Tony Malkin, our Chair and CEO, will provide some comments on David and our CFO transition. As always, we also have with us in the room Andrew Prentice, our Chief Accounting Officer and Treasurer, who will shortly as per our filings be our Acting-CFO and John Hogg, who many of you know, our Head of Financial Planning and Analysis. I'll now turn the call over to Tom Durels, Tom?

Thomas Durels -- Executive Vice President, Real Estate

Thanks, John and good morning everyone. In our second quarter numbers, we made more progress on our four drivers of top line de-risked and embedded growth. The breakdown of these top line revenue growth drivers as of June 30th, 2019 over the next five years, we estimate to be $96 million, can be found on Page 7 of our investor presentation. For reference, this compares to $543 million in trailing 12 month cash rental revenue and $386 million in trailing 12 months cash NOI, as of June 30th, 2019. In the second quarter, we signed 55 new and renewal leases, totaling approximately 261,000 square feet. This included approximately 175,000 square feet in our Manhattan office properties, 53,000 square feet in our Greater New York metropolitan office properties and 33,000 square feet in our retail portfolio, which included 27,000 square feet of parking garage space. Significant new office leases signed during the quarter include a 26,000 square foot new lease at 111 West 33rd Street with The Interpublic Group and a 21,000 square foot full floor new lease with L'Occitane, also at 111 West 33rd Street. In addition, we leased 14 new pre-built or 81,000 square feet predominantly at One Grand Central Place, 1350 Broadway and 111 West 33rd Street.

As a reminder, on Page 9 of our supplemental, we maintain updated disclosure on potential vacates and renewals for leases that expire for the remaining two quarters of 2019 and full year 2020. This chart shows tenants to be relocated within our portfolio and vacates to be replaced by new tenants with whom leases have been signed. We have continued with our proven strategy to vacate and consolidate spaces, redevelop them and release those spaces at higher rent to better quality tenants. There is a delay between the move out of the existing tenants and the commencement of replacement leases and a further delay between lease commencement and GAAP revenue recognition, so our occupancy varies quarter-by-quarter and delays impact our near-term reported revenue.

During the second quarter, rental rates on new and renewal leases across our entire portfolio were 12.2% higher on a cash basis, compared to prior cash escalator rents and at our Manhattan office properties, we signed new leases at a positive cash rent spread of 22.2%. Of course leasing spreads always depend on expiring fully escalated rents, our vacant redeveloped office space had prior cash fully escalated rents of $53 per square foot, which is well below current market. On Page 28 of our investor presentation, we estimate our future cash leasing spreads, our Manhattan office leases will vary between 12% and 24%, based on the assumption of current market rents without any increase. We have raised our weighted average asking rents in our Manhattan office buildings by over 4% on a trailing 12 months basis, following increases throughout 2018 and demand for our product locations and price points remains good. As we show on Page 12 of our investor presentation, our trailing 12 month net effective rent growth on a year-over-year basis for new Manhattan office increased by 6.2%, the first straight quarter in which we have experienced net effective rent growth in excess of 5%.

We have a healthy pipeline of leases in negotiation across the portfolio for both full floors and pre-builds. We remain focused on our strategy to vacate and redevelop space that we will bring the market for future lease-up. Now I will turn the call over to Greg Faje. Greg?

Greg Faje -- Director of Investor Relations

Thanks, Tom. For the second quarter, we reported core FFO of $65 million or $0.22 per diluted share. Cash NOI was $94 million, down approximately 3% from the prior year period. Excluding the observatory results on which I will comment momentarily, cash NOI was flat. On Page 6 of the supplemental, we have added a new disclosure in response to helpful comments from the investors and analysts. This new quarterly scheduled commenced leases and their free rent period provides visibility to when the cash contribution to NOI is realized. Also for your models, note our property operating expenses will be impacted in the next two quarters by onetime R&M expense, associated with our [Indecipherable] and Tower Work at the Empire State Building. These expenses are expected to total approximately $5 million in the second half.

Page 16 of our supplemental highlights our observatory operations. Revenue for the second quarter of 2019 decreased to $32.9 million or 6.6% from the prior year period. Four factors combined for this result, $3 million of reduced revenue related to the closure of the 102nd floor observation deck and bad weather, offset by improved pricing and the shift of Easter to the second quarter. Net operating income for the observatory was $24.5 million or 10.9% lower than the second quarter of 2018 due to the aforementioned revenue drivers and higher expenses relating to the observatory redevelopment. Our present schedule is to open new galleries on the second floor on the 29th of July, the new 102nd floor in September, and the new 88th floor, the final phase in November. Excluding the second quarter, 2018, 102nd floor revenue but including the benefit of the entire Easter holiday during the second quarter of 2019, revenue increased 2.3% year-over-year and NOI was flat over the same period. As reported on Page 16 of the supplemental, the Observatory hosted approximately 968,000 visitors in the second quarter 2019, a decrease of 81,000 visitors compared to the second quarter of 2018. Of this 81,000 decline, we estimate that bad weather days has resulted in approximately 67,000 fewer visitors in the prior year period.

In addition, we estimate that the shift in the Easter holiday, which fell entirely within the second quarter of this year and in the prior year was split between the first and second quarters resulted in a benefit of approximately 20,000 visitors. That leaves 34,000 fewer visitors attributable to other factors. Fr the six months ended June 30th, 2019, Observatory revenue decreased to $3.4 million or 5.3% from the prior year period due to a similar mix of factors I just mentioned. Net operating income was $37.5 million, 9.4% lower than the prior period. Excluding the 102nd floor revenue in 2018, Observatory revenue was roughly flat and NOI was down 2.5% over the same period. The Observatory posted 1.57 million visitors in the first half of 2019, down 7.3% compared to the 1.69 million in the prior year period.

Moving to our balance sheet, as of June 30th, 2019, we had total debt outstanding of approximately $1.9 billion and no borrowing under our $1.1 billion unsecured line of credit. The debt has a weighted average interest rate of 3.84% and a weighted average term to maturity of 7.6 years. None of our outstanding debt has variable rates. Our debt maturities are well laddered and our $250 million exchangeable bond matures this August 2015.

We plan to retire the debt utilizing some of our existing cash on our balance sheet and we continue to consider our options to replenish the cash balance in the fourth quarter of 2019 with long-term fixed rate financing for many of the following options: bank term loan, [Indecipherable] replacement, public bond offering or secured mortgage financing. As of June 30th, 2019, our consolidated net debt to total market capitalization was 23.6% and consolidated net debt to EBITDA was 3.9 times, and we held cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments of $525 million.

I would now like to turn the mike over to David. David?

David Karp -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

As per our press release on the subject, next week I will step down from my responsibility as CFO and return to the West Coast. I joined ESRT back in November 2011, and I take pride in the role I played in our company's IPO, the creation of our extraordinary balance sheet, and the accounting, financial planning and analysis and Investor teams I built here. To our investors, lenders and sell-side analysts, I've enjoyed our collaboration in the time we spent together. I am particularly proud just knowing that some of you can now tell the difference between an IPA and a [Indecipherable]. So with that, I will say thank you, and I look forward to win our perhaps next cross. Now I will turn the call over to Tony for some remarks before we open the call for your questions. Tony?

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

First of all, on behalf of our Board and Leadership team, we all want to thank David for his service to ESRT. You all know and we here all recognize that the company is run by a team and ESRT is no different. Our great team here has worked together and will continue to work together to maintain our low leverage, liquid, and flexible balance sheet. We look forward to continue our excellent relationships with our investors, lenders, and analysts.

The accounting team led by our soon to be acting Chief Financial Officer, Drew Prentice; the Financial Planning and Analysis team led by our two-and-a-half decade veteran John Hogg; and Investor Relations team led by Greg Faje will all be guided by John Kessler as we move through our transition to a new CFO. We have engaged Korn Ferry International in a search for our next CFO and we have tremendous inbound interest in the position from outside the company, and interest from within.

We thank David for his leadership and contribution and wish him the best of luck out there in California and Oregon.

Now let's turn the call over to the operator for Q&A.


Related Articles

Questions and Answers:

Operator

Thank you. [Operator Instruction] Our first question comes from the line of Jason Green with Evercore ISI. Please proceed with your question.

Jason Green -- Evercore ISI -- Analyst

Good morning. Given where the stock sits today and what seems to be an inability to find an acquisition in the marketplace that make sense, has there been any change in thinking surrounding buybacks?

John Kessler -- President and Chief Operating Officer

Hi, good morning, Jason, it's John. No, I think our view on buybacks continues to be where it was in the past. As you know, we're focused on trying to grow the business rather than shrink it and deploying capital into a buyback reduces our share count etc.. We'd rather -- we have the balance sheet that we've constructed the cash and liquidity for a purpose, which is to create optionality for the future and for growth and that continues to be where our mind is at.

Jason Green -- Evercore ISI -- Analyst

Okay. And then I guess beyond bad weather days, what are you guys seeing in the general tourism market that potentially might be driving visitation down to the Observatory?

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Well, I would say, Tony here. The competitive landscape for destination attractions has been very challenging in general. I believe performance has been for across the board quite sketchy, when I look at everything from One World Trade Center, which is down 33% from last year, through our vendors who we share and which is our only source of input vendors meaning folks who sell our tickets.

And in common with other venues, we know we're outperforming on Top of the Rock though we don't have a full picture of their performance, the way we do from One World Trade. We know that Circle Line and some other attractions are down public announced numbers for the first six months of 2019 show the Metropolitan Museum and some other museums down. And at the same time you've got Hudson Yards that has opened, which initially a report spoke to tracking sell data upwards of 70,000 people a day on weekends. Now that same sell data reports less than half that number per day. I think we should anticipate that the noise from competing transactions, including One Vanderbilt and the press and advertising around them, and tourist trends will continue for some time.

We did see this with the opening of the 9/11 Memorial Museum and One World Trade Center and even the reopening of the Top of the Rock. That said, we've always grown revenue. I think it's a moment just to say a couple of words about the review of the observatory and to set the table as to where we are, and to give you guys an expectation of what we're going to be doing. Phase 1 of the -- which was the new Observatory entrance opened in August 2018 and has already increased the desirability of our 34th Street retail space abilities and cleaned up our Fifth Avenue Lobby and Fifth Avenue experience for tourists and office users alike. Phase 2 which are new galleries on the second floor will open on the 29th, this Monday, 29th of July. And I have to say that you will have to see it to believe it but it is extraordinary. Phase 3, which is our complete redo of the 102nd floor will open by the end of September.

Phase 4, which is our complete redo of the 88th floor will open by the end of November. So, there is nothing like the Empire State Building and there is nothing like we will deliver here in the world period full stop no exceptions. We've all done this work, while operating the Observatory. It is truly impressive by our ESRT professionals and outside creative and execution team If you add to that the fact that we have had scaffolding up for our [Indecipherable] Local Law 11 work. It has not been simple to move millions of tourists in addition to all of the contractors and laborers in trades and creative folks that we've had in and out of the Observatory. So just to shine a little light on the Observatory, I think it's just worthwhile to note and there is going to be noise out there, number one and number two, we feel well recognized that we are executing at a very high level on the office. We are delivering, Tom Durels will be able to go and do it. A great trailing 12 month net rent growth. We are delivering fantastic credits and long-term leases to our buildings, very busy. But we've had a significant hurdle to overcome, which we have, which was the reduction in our broadcast income, and we know that if the Observatory doesn't deliver that a lot of that great result on the office leasing isn't going to show. So the Observatory, we are excited for the opening. The competitive landscape is all over the place. Don't forget, we had, as you know we had heinous weather, the worst years for the first half of this year.

If we adjust for the closure of 102nd Observation deck, second quarter revenue was up 2.3% last year and first half revenue was flat. And our per caps, on trailing 12 months of the 6% increase versus last year, that said, there will be a lot of noise coming for the upcoming period. I'm sorry if I've gone on too long, but I figured, I'd answer a lot of questions about this all at once.

Jason Green -- Evercore ISI -- Analyst

No problem. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from the line of Craig Mailman with KeyBanc Capital Markets. Please proceed with your question.

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Hey, guys. I'll start. Hey, David, congrats and best of luck with the next phase, and thanks for your help over the years. Just want to hit on the cash NOI growth so in the quarter. I guess maybe Greg or David, could you guys just walk me through. I would have thought given the kind of the conversation last quarter about the $3 million that would kind of flow through more so in 2Q than a little bit more on top of that, that we may have had kind of a bigger pick up this quarter. Could you just kind of talk about the puts and takes that may have kind of offset that on the margin?

Greg Faje -- Director of Investor Relations

Sure, this is Greg here, if you look on a sequential basis, we did show some property cash NOI growth of about 3%. And if you look more closely at the cash rental revenues, they increased about $1.3 million on a sequential basis from first quarter to second quarter. This increase consisted of two parts really, you get approximately $3 million of free rent burn off and that was partially offset here by tenant vacates of about 700,000 and holdover rent that occurred in 1Q in the first quarter of about 600,000 and a few other small miscellaneous items.

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Okay. So the way it looks, we should still, it looks to be more 2020 kind of ramp at this point, just because I think it's going up, but on a cash basis, you're probably not going to get till next year given kind of the enhanced disclosure you guys gave.

Greg Faje -- Director of Investor Relations

Yeah, I think if you look at the new schedule that you saw there on Page 6, that gives you a little more clarity in terms of the timing as it comes in quarterly with both in there specifically to help people model it better, and then you've got the vacate schedule on Page 9, that I would also, you have to look at that in terms of the offset that you'll see over the course of 2019 and in early 2020.

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

The only thing I'd add to that is, we are always opportunistic to generate additional revenue, where we can from existing tenancies. And so if you look at the underlying recurring business, it's actually doing very well. We had other income from other tenant related transactions, and we will always do that to the extent that we really prefer to do direct leases with new tenants than enable subleasing in our spaces. We like to get tenants to buy their way out of leases, which produces extra revenue and covers our cost of re-tenanting rather than let the market pick up the scrap of the discount. And so that can distort the excellent performance we're achieving on a recurring basis.

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

That's helpful and maybe Tony, just thoughts here. I mean you kind of the commentary today has been good, the results have been good and the net effective rent growth side, the occupancy side. But yet the stock still trades at a pretty wide discount here and New York, last time [Indecipherable] still pretty a global market. So I'm just curious, your thoughts overall kind of what do you think you guys need to do or the market needs to understand on the disconnect here between public and private values and fundamentals versus sentiment?

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

But first of all, I very much appreciate your question, because it gives me a chance to explain to Jamie Feldman that I do more than just the Observatory, second of all, but I think there are few things which really stand out. Number one, there is a reason we went public. And the reason we went public was to resolve a series of antiquated partnerships and limited liability companies, bringing modern governance structure and a unified balance sheet and make things more efficient. And that process was difficult. We're glad we did it. If I sit down with other weathering in the REIT business right now, public companies, brothering and sistering, I would say. I would say that there is a, a common refrain that I hear is the reason that you're public is to be able to access capital markets and the discounts at which we're trading, we can't access capital markets, so why should we be, should we be public? I think that speaks to two things. One, we don't need to access capital markets right now to grow externally. It has got a great balance sheet, lot of liquidity, great access to additional cash through our line and we have low leverage.

So, I'm very mindful of the general scale about to, you hear from the CEO side and of how we're differentiated there. I'd also say I had a something put together for me by Greg Faje, which takes a look at the different REIT sectors and their premium or discount to NAV as determined by Green Street, whether that's accurate or not, that's a consistent measure in July 2017 and compare to July 2019. And we have the lowest discount in our peer group in July 2017. And we were trading at a slight discount, a single digit discount. If you look at that same chart today to that July 2019, office REITs are down there with malls. But if you blow open that office sector, you'll see the bottom four properties are all New York City based REITs, SL Green, Vornado, [Indecipherable] and ourselves. We still have the lowest discount to that NAV. That being said, being the loudest mute in the choir, it's still a difficult spot in which to be. And there is no question that while we're focused on external growth, we have to look at that massive disconnect between what the private equity flows are and how that's driving values in the market and where we are as a public company.

So first of all, while we're not exercising it now, everybody knows that we've got a buyback privilege. We have that right and we made that capacity bigger the last time we reviewed it. Number two, we've got a balance sheet which will allow that to occur, should that something we want to pursue. When we look at a bigger picture and the things that we have to do, we have to continue to execute as an office and retail primarily New York focused REIT. And we have to continue to execute at a high level. We have to address the Observatory which we're doing, which we saw three years ago, three-and-a-half years ago, and all that work is coming to fruition now. And then I think you're right we have to have existential conversation amongst the Executive Team and with our Board on a regular and recurring basis, which is what we do, which is how should we be positioning ourselves as a public company? What's the best way to deliver long-term value for the shareholders? How do we drive the bottom line?

And in that I would just tell you that we always look at every option, and we try not to do it daily, because it gets in the way of executing our regular tasks. But we look at every option. It's a robust conversation, and the question you're having is something that we answer with a variety of options, which we weigh every time we get together with our Board.

Jordan Sadler -- KeyBanc -- Analyst

Hey, Tony. It's Jordan Sadler here with Craig. I had just one follow-up on sort of the buyback, because John in response to the initial questions that you guys want to grow the company, not shrink the capital base, which is understood. But your cost of capital is quite high as implied by the market. Would you guys invest opportunistically in assets today at returns that are lower than those that could be garnered by just buying your stock?

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

I think that if you were to look at it at a current return with the prospect of improvement over time, the answer to that would be yes. I think if you were to look at buying 540 Madison Avenue with a 4.5 unlevered IRR, at least how we underwrite it, or 477 Madison at a similar number for a lesser asset or I can run down a list of other transactions which have taken place in New York City.

The answer is we have no way. It's absolutely, better to have the flexibility or to increase our return per share. But don't forget, we still have that $96 million or so of topline growth, which we're driving from our embedded growth drivers. We still believe that, but when you start to see the articles out there explaining why this economic cycle, justifying and rationalizing why this economic cycle is virtuous and will never end. Every time those articles have popped up, it's a sign that the thing is pretty close to ending those, those articles are popping up, we've got tremendous deficits in the government, we have tremendous unfunded state liabilities, we have a trade war with China, which is impacting tourists visits along with flows of capital, sales of homes, you name it. We have a world in which the Europeans are talking about lowering their interest rates again, with that negative spreads in Europe and negative to zero in bonds Europe and Japan. At some point at some price, I would imagine, given the alternatives, we could find ourselves in a position where we would say it makes more sense to buy our stock than to do anything else but right now I think John very correctly and succinctly expressed our view.

Jordan Sadler -- KeyBanc -- Analyst

Okay, thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from the line of Blaine Heck with Wells Fargo. Please proceed with your question.

Blaine Heck -- Wells Fargo -- Analyst

Thanks, good morning. Tony or John, just to expand on the investment picture, can you give any color on whether you guys are pursuing anything right now and whether there are specific opportunities for the kind of challenged assets or unique situations that you've talked about before?

John Kessler -- President and Chief Operating Officer

Yeah, hey, Blaine. John here. I mean we are, we do look at actively what is out there in the market and I think what just and maybe going back to the prior question, I think about what we, how would we deploy capital, I think you can see that we haven't, right? We haven't made any investments in the current environment, because of the super low returns that we're seeing that investors are getting in the private market because there's so much capital there.

I think what we've continued to see is, whether it is a income in place or a core deal or a redevelopment or value add situation that the market continues to price it aggressively, and to date we haven't found anything that's attractive to us, and I think we haven't seen that change. We've also seen, it seems like certainly the smaller transaction sizes. Also there is even more liquidity and they are more aggressively priced.

Blaine Heck -- Wells Fargo -- Analyst

Okay, that's helpful. And you guys obviously have a relationship with QIA. They have the right of first refusal on any JV you guys might like to do. So, I'm assuming you guys have regular discussions with them. Can you give us any sense of their appetite for investing in New York office at this point?

John Kessler -- President and Chief Operating Officer

But first of all, we are fortunate to maintain a very good and close relationship with our Qatari partners and these are excellent people with a long-term view. They've been terrific partners. Second of all, I think it's no secret to know that they, they still have capital to invest. They played a large role in the Vornado joint venture providing half of the new equity that went into the new capitalization of the retail on which they did transact. They wrote a big check. They have the ability to write big checks. I think that it's also very clear these are smart long-term thinkers and they are willing, ready and able to participate in anything where we present a compelling case. And we talk about this often. The reality, however, is we haven't anything where we've been able to present to them a compelling case. And we're not a private equity operation where we're seeking to aggregate capital collect fees and get a hope certificate for optionality for upside in the future.

So, we take our partnership with them very seriously. We treat them with the highest respect and regard, and we know that if we discuss things with them we have their ear and if there are things which we advocate with very high level of confidence that they will participate. As far as their interest generically and what they might do, I'm not in a position to comment on that. It's best to ask them just they remain very engaged with us. And when we discuss ideas with them, which we have where we're trying to rub two sticks together and create value for our investors, they've been very supportive.

Blaine Heck -- Wells Fargo -- Analyst

Okay, that's helpful. And then lastly Tom we noticed you guys added a 28,000 square foot intentional vacate in 2020 to the retail portfolio, small in size, but for the retail, it's kind of big. Can you just give some color on that decision and where that space is?

Thomas Durels -- Executive Vice President, Real Estate

Well, the vacates in 2020 are primarily related to Heartland Brewery whose lease expires in early 2020 there. As a reminder, they occupy about 70,000 square feet. They occupy the corner at 350 5th, at the base of the Empire State Building. This is a great opportunity for us to enhance the experience in the retail, the retail at the base of Empire State Building. We are actively marketing that space and then we added some size street retail at 501 7th Avenue. It's occupied by some legacy environment tenants, we just like we can bring in a better type of tenancy to provide amenity and services to our office tenants.

So those are the primary drivers of the vacate in 2020 for retail. But while we're on the topic of just the the planned and non-vacates and potential vacates on the office side, whether it be the tenant vacated, potential vacates some of the unknowns, we have space that represents a great upside opportunity for us. There are floor that we will be giving back. We're potentially getting back that include Tower floors at Empire State Building with fully escalated rents on an average of $39 a square foot. We have full floors at 1400 Broadway and 501 7th Avenue, also with in-place fully escalated rent of $39 a square foot. These are well below market. We're anxious to have the opportunity to release those spaces at significantly higher rents.

Blaine Heck -- Wells Fargo -- Analyst

Great, that's helpful. David, thanks for your help over the years,, and enjoy that West Coast beer.

David Karp -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Blaine. I appreciate that.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from the line of Emmanuel Korchman with Citi. Please proceed with your question.

Michael Bilerman -- citigroup -- Analyst

Hey, it's Michael Bilerman here with Manny. Tony, I wanted to come back to the buyback program just to understand sort of the Board's perspective in authorizing the buyback last October, which is $500 million. The stock at that time was call it $16 to $17 over the course of the last nine months, it's been anywhere down from 10% to 15% from those levels. So I have to imagine that when you put it in place, there was some expectation that the stock represented decent value at that point. And I understand that you want to have liquidity and you want to keep the balance sheet fresh, but why put one in place and then not even execute any of it even modestly at values that I would imagine you and the Board felt very comfortable when you put it in place as a tool and probably feel even more compelled now that it's 10% to 15% lower than that value.

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Sure. Thanks. Thanks, Michael. I look at this in two ways. First, just by way of background, if you recall, at the time we put this into place, we did announce that we had already had a buyback authorized. And what we did with this authorization is recognize that we were going into new territory, not just for us as a public company, but for the New York City office sector in general, and we decided that we wanted to make that authorization. Two things, one and bigger and number two, public. And the reason we wanted to make it bigger was to make sure that we could take advantage of opportunity should things really fall out of bed all together. And number two, we wanted to make it public, because our plan is if we were to execute, not to do it in drips and drabs to support the stock price, but to do it frankly quietly and stealthily to acquire an aggregate value for ongoing investors as opposed to selling investors. With that in mind, what we discovered through advice from council is if we didn't make it at fact that we had a buyback program in place public we could be exposed to litigation, should we execute in that quiet and stealthy fashion. And having spent decades in litigation with various parties, I really have no interest in entering into that again in my lifetime. So it was a prophylactic measure.

The second thing I would say is we look at ourselves not just in relationship to our value relative to our stock price. But we look at our stock price in relationship to peers with whom we might like to conduct M&A activity in New York City, and they're all trading at bigger discounts than we are. And the fact is that we look at that relative value merger opportunity as a meaningful outlet for us, which we have regular discussions internally, in which we again trying to rub two sticks together. We want to leave the option open for that. So instead of just looking at our balance sheet and our stock price and our net asset value, I look at our balance sheet, our stock price, our net asset value and the surrounding environment. And that's why I say, what's the major distinguishing factor between us and the rest is we have a lot of cash and a lot of leverage ability within our balance sheet, both to transact and to assist others with problems that might develop with liquidity on their watches in case of further disorientation. So, when we have these discussions at the Board level, and the Board is 100% aligned with management and management is 100% aligned with the Board, we look at that second factor very carefully. And again we on the first part of the response, we made that change as far as size and going public, just to protect ourselves and increase our flexibility.

Michael Bilerman -- citigroup -- Analyst

And then when you think about M&A, putting aside public to public, I think one of the big things you've always talked about since the IPO process was the relationships that you and your family had with a lot of private owners that owned assets not just office assets, but other property types within the New York and metro area and the ability to provide units to those holders that can buy into the Empire State Realty Trust was an advantage. And given where your stock is, can you talk a little bit about how those negotiations or those discussions have been going, because one would assume that it's a little bit more challenging given where the current stock price is relative to what you perceive as NAV value?

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

You're master of understatement there Manny you know with--

Michael Bilerman -- citigroup -- Analyst

It's Michael.

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Oh, it is Michael. Okay. Sorry, Well then Manny you're silent, Michael you're a master of understatement. I would say that when you look at 477 Madison, which is a slumpy, low-feeling, clear high, half block frontage on a, with best of retail, because the Madison Avenue goes downhill there. So it's not even retail frontage, you're next to St. Pat's Cathedral, and the Palace Hotel. So when you, when you look at these things and you say, that building, functionally, when you look at the purchase price and what they have to spend on it, it's easily a $1,000 a foot. And when you look at that and the rents that can be achieved there and the operating costs and real estate taxes, you will save yourself well, every single private owner of office in New York City assumes her or his value, or her or his asset on a transaction is worth between $850 and $1,200 a square foot. And if there is a slight difference between the public value and the private value, that's a much easier bridge to, you have to take to get over that gap of value. That being said, we still firmly believe in the conversations we have. We like to highlight that if there is a next-gen, which is not capable, if there is a next-gen, which has such diffuse interests as far as continuing to receive distributions, wanting to increase distributions or wanting to cash out. If there is a next-gen, which has disputes as to who is in charge, we are a terrific solve.

I would make one other comment. It's not just the prices at which these properties are trading, but it's the availability of debt. We know one family that has a property, which is going to go 100% vacant with an over-market or nearly at market lease. It has debt maturing at the same time as the vacate. It has no depth to execute on an improvement program confronting the New York City, 80 x 50 laws with regard to energy consumption and greenhouse gas coefficient carbon output. They've got proposals to take out their expiring, retiring, maturing loan and fund all of their improvements based on speculation, and no new tenant. And so the availability in debt markets, the availability in capital markets, there's no question, it makes our task harder. It doesn't daunt us, doesn't stop us, but it definitely makes it harder.

Michael Bilerman -- citigroup -- Analyst

Just last thing, the buyback does expire at the end of this year. At what point you reauthorize that and is the intent just to let the $500 million flow for another year? What's process and discussion going on at the Board level for that?

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Let's put it this way, I can't talk about the future, but I can talk about the current and the past and our view is and our view has been, when I say our, that means Management and the Board, that having stock buyback authorizations, I should say, because let's not forget there are a couple of different ways in which, under which I can buy back stock, we believe it's very important to have this in place. And it's an option in our quiver and we want to make sure it's in there.

Michael Bilerman -- citigroup -- Analyst

Right. Just an arrow, but you haven't been able to take it out. It doesn't sound like any intend to take it any time in the future?

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

No, anytime in the future is a long way -- I would say that we haven't seen a reason to do it yet. I would say that standing here today or sitting here as we are, we absolutely have a specific price at which we would act. There is no question in that. At the same time, if we were to get that and find out that every other New York City based REIT stock moved in concert with ours, we would look at that along with our own stock price and coming to a decision. But right now, I can tell you for sure that there is a number at which the Board and we have agreed we would act.

Michael Bilerman -- citigroup -- Analyst

All right. And I think if you look at SL Green, I think from that perspective, they are selling assets in NAV and buying their stock back at a discount. Inherently they're creating NAV value and real estate value, arguably what's going on in the macro environment New York is clearly affecting all of your stock prices, but just purely from a capital allocation perspective, using that capacity selling assets, selling interest in assets at market value, which there is a large and liquid market that you've just talked about and then buying back that stock at some level of the discount, creates value, right? It's just math, you can't argue with it. So, it would seem as though that strategy would be a good one.

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

No, you know, look SL Green spent a lot of money and their average buyback price is materially in excess of where their stock trades today.

Michael Bilerman -- citigroup -- Analyst

But I wouldn't look at the stock prices being the measure of success, I would look at the value creation in terms of selling assets in NAV and buying back stock below it. Where would their stocks be if they hadn't done that? Where would their NAV be if they didn't do it, right? It is pure capital allocation. You can think of in hindsight, in hindsight, yes, one would like the stock to be higher, but selling assets, add NAV value and buying stock back in a discount to that value creates value absolutely doing nothing. So I'll let the call go on. Thank you.

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from the line of Jamie Feldman with Bank of America Merrill Lynch. Please proceed with your question.

Jamie Feldman -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Great, thank you. I guess just a follow-up. I mean do you guys think at all about asset sales, especially in your core kind of New York, Manhattan assets?

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, we've looked at this, Jamie, from the perspective that if we sell assets, particularly in our core locations in New York City and Manhattan, we have to look at A, what we are going to do with that money and B, we have to look at it and say, we're already a smallish company and if we liquidate further, we will be a definitively smaller company. And I think it's at that point, there is not a lot that we can do which wouldn't really just say, either we should liquidate the whole company or we shouldn't sell anything. And when we look at selling assets or portions of assets, not only does that shrink the business. But when you're selling partial interest and taking in JV partners, we have, we don't have any of that right now. And that gives us absolute flexibility to do whatever we want, whenever we want. So again, we look at everything, we discuss everything, but what we're doing right now is where we've come out after the robust discussions we've had to date.

Jamie Feldman -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Okay, all right. Shifting gears, you guys had talked about the debt maturity coming up in the back half of the year. Can you talk about, I know you talked about several different options to refinance. How should we think about the potential accretion or dilution from those different options, or do you think it's more of a neutral for earnings?

David Karp -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, Jamie, it's David. So if you take a look at the existing exchangeable on a cash coupon basis, we pay about 2.625% and for GAAP purposes which incorporates the non-cash portion of the equity option and the amortization of the deferred financing costs, it's around 3.9%. We have a swap in place, we put in place a 7-year before starting interest rate swap, which has a strike price of 2.958%. If you look at current spreads, let's just say on a 7-year term loan, that's running about 150 basis points. That would put us in an all-in coupon of about 4.5%. So on a cash basis, our interest cost would be about 190 basis points higher, which assuming a $250 million notional amount, would translate into $4.7 million annually. On a GAAP basis, our incremental interest cost would be roughly 60 basis points higher, which equates to roughly $1.5 million annually and again on that same notion of $250 million.

Jamie Feldman -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Okay. I think you guys listed several different options, it sounds like that's your most likely option is to grow it into long-term.

David Karp -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

I'm just giving you that as one example. But yeah, we do have a number of options. We can do a 7-year term loan, we can do a private placement. We could enter the public markets and we could do a secured mortgage financing. So there are a lot of options to look at. I just gave you the term loan as one example.

Jamie Feldman -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Okay. So I guess if you were to think about the best case scenario, I mean which of those would actually be accretive or would they all be kind of at least at neutral, if not dilutive?

David Karp -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

They are all roughly in the same ballpark. And I think given that we have the swap in place of roughly 3%, that's going to be the driver. The spreads are going to be somewhat comparable across executions. So, I think that's really the difference.

Jamie Feldman -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Okay and then Greg, you talked about this R&M expense in the back half of the year. Can you talk more about that? And then if you look at your year-over-year expenses on the Observatory, they're up meaningfully and in fact you compare the revenue, the revenue decline year-over-year to the NOI decline year-over-year and it's a much bigger hit. Can you just talk about the expenses in the quarter and then what you expect going forward?

Greg Faje -- Director of Investor Relations

Yeah, Jamie, this is Greg here, I'll touch on the R&M, and then I'll switch back to David to talk about the Observatory.The R&M work is work related to Local Law 11 which is an annual, five year, every five years you have to do that work and that's primarily done at the Empire State Building, also known as [Indecipherable], as well as some work at the top of the tower there. We expect about $5 million of expense in the second half relating to this, these two combined.

David Karp -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

And on the Observatory expense, the year-over-year increase was really attributable to the higher IT expenses, both maintenance and consulting, which was associated with our new ticket kiosks and the entrants hardware and software. We had higher R&M expenses. We had higher marketing expenses. This was partially offset by lower payroll and benefits. But what I will point out is that we still anticipate the run rate on expenses to approximate what we experienced in the 4th quarter of 2018. And as I said before, this anticipation is based upon early experience with the technology. And as the new systems and technology are stabilized, we can have a better sense of what the run rate will be as the year progresses and we'll communicate to you if we feel there is going to be any differences from that run rate. Lastly, just on the labor savings that we realized from the reduction in the cash shares is being somewhat offset by the higher technology costs.

Jamie Feldman -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Okay. It certainly it comes down from the 2Q run rate and we should look at 4Q , as an example? And that's --

David Karp -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

I would. Yeah, yeah, I mean quarter-over-quarter, there was an increase as well, that was associated with some higher marketing which is timing related, and higher security and credit card fees, which is seasonality. So we're always going to see some movement around the expenses with seasonality. We had introduced, introduction of the new software. But when we look at our expectations, I think a good run rate is what we saw in the fourth quarter of 2018.

Jamie Feldman -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Okay. And then, Tony, you commented about some of the signs you're seeing that give them a little bit of concern that were late in the cycle in one of these responses to one of the questions before. I'm just curious, are you guys seeing any kind of shift in tenant behavior, whether it's the types of tenants you're seeing leasing space or their willingness to go long or short or anything that's kind of telling you based on prior cycles that something is changing as well?

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

As far on the leasing front, I would -- this time by the way, on the leasing front, we're not seeing any change in the market that would indicate that were late in the cycle. I would say that we feel great about the pipeline activity we have in our office space. We've got leases and also negotiation four partial floors at 111, 1400, 1333 and 250. We're seeing demand for across all of our properties for both pre-built and full floors from a variety of tenant types, that includes tech, [Indecipherable], consumer product, professional services and another. And you know, as I pointed out in my earlier comments, look at the net effective rent growth that we've posted. Our actual trailing 12 month net effective rent growth on a year-over-year basis for new Manhattan office leases increased by 6.2% this quarter. That's a third straight quarter in which we have experienced net effective rent growth in excess of 5% for new leases in our Manhattan office properties. I think Greg has reminded that's on page 12 of our investor presentation and we're seeing a lot of the leasing that we're doing, it does involve and employment growth. So all of these are good signs, we're not seeing any change at least out on the street, on the front lines where we're doing leasing.

Jamie Feldman -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Okay, that's helpful. Alright, David, good luck in the next chapter. It's been a pleasure working with you.

David Karp -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Jamie. As with you.

Jamie Feldman -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Alright, take care.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from the line John Guinee with Stifel. Please proceed with your question.

John Guinee -- Stifel -- Analyst

Great, thank you. Well I'm worn out from that theoretical share buyback conversation. David, we are going to miss you do know that in California, they only drink wine. They don't drink beer.

David Karp -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

That's what, it happens here in Bend, Oregon.

John Guinee -- Stifel -- Analyst

So dealing with the more mundane day-to-day stuff here, your Page 6-Page 9 analysis or comparison is incredibly helpful. And if I look at the cash gains for commenced leases in free rent, I come up with, you come up with about $29 million. And then if I look at the rest of this year and next year. And I look at the tenant vacates and the intentional vacations. I get about 570,000 square feet and at your in-place rent that equates to about $30 million. So is this just kind of a Ying Yang where all the leases about to commence are offset by the roll-outs in the next 18 months or is there a chance that we see some NOI growth?

Greg Faje -- Director of Investor Relations

Yeah. Hey, John, this is Greg here. Yeah, we do give these schedules here to help you out. And as you noted, we give the new schedule on Page 6 that gives you a little more clarity into the timing there and I think it's important to look at that as well, the vacates we give on Page 9. And just from a growth perspective, we do have the 102nd floor, Observation floor that's currently out of service,, and we'll will come back online at the end of September. And few other factors that have sort of create these headwinds here in 2018 that we discussed previously in terms of leasing costs that are previously cap but are now being expense. And so as you look forward, we expect to see some growth.

David Karp -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

And the other thing that's important and why we went to the quarterly representation is that the timing of both the vacates and the burn off for the free rent are important. When it occurs, if you just took a convention mid quarter or midyear, whatever, it might distort what is really, really expected to happen. So I take a close look at the quarterly breakdown and that might help you fine tune your model.

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

John this is Tony. John just one additional comment I'd like to make on that is that's a reminder we are intentionally making space to unlock the value creation through market increase in rents. I pointed out earlier, we have a number of spaces that either we are intentionally vacating or that if the tenants choose to vacate, we will re-lease those spaces at significantly higher rent, because the in-place rents are significantly below market. So we view this as upside opportunity.

John Guinee -- Stifel -- Analyst

Yeah. A great Segway, everything I read about Stamford, Connecticut and the New York suburban markets in that vicinity is pretty scary. Can you talk about the suburban market and the ability to re-lease this product, given your $40 million capital spend? And then also a curiosity question, Heartland Brewery 17,000 square feet, will that be a roll up for a roll down in rent and what kind of capital do you think you'd have to expand there?

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

So let me first set upon the Greater New York Metropolitan Portfolio. As a reminder, we are just about 89% leased and we did do 53,000 square feet of leasing this quarter. As you mentioned, as previously announced we're underway with an upgrade of the common areas and amenities improvements to our gyms, dining, and creating new coffee lounges, conference centers, lobbies and outdoor areas. And the work that we've completed so far looks great. We've received very favorable feedback from brokers and tenants. We're early in the marketing of some of the space that we know that we've be getting back. As a reminder, we've got the best locations with a niche of our submarkets and we're conveniently located in near mass transit stations and intersections of major thoroughfares. Look, we're confident in our offerings and based upon the work that we've completed that and the favorite feedback that we've gotten, we're quite confident. We like a locations and we like product.

Moving on to the, the retail, it's, I would simply say that corner space at Empire State Building is incredibly unique. We are focused on bringing in the right use for this space that will enhance the experience for both our office tenants and Observatory guests. We're working on with some prospects right now, some very interesting and exciting concepts. So whether ends up being an increase in rents or not, I think we're looking at it more holistically as to what it does for the Empire State Building and the Observatory and for our office tenants in the overall experience. And we just don't think that the existing tenant does does much for us right now.

John Guinee -- Stifel -- Analyst

Holistic leasing. Okay, great. Thank you.

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Goodbye.

John Guinee -- Stifel -- Analyst

Bye.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from the line of John Kim with BMO Capital Markets. Please proceed with your question.

John Kim -- BMO Capital Markets. -- Analyst

Thank you. Congratulations to David. Good luck. My first question is on occupancy. It's the highest occupancy you've had as a public company, but at 90% is still room for upside. Do you see occupancy growing from here or it's just a blip and with the tenant move-outs and so forth, it's kind of stays or hovers around 90 or below?

Thomas Durels -- Executive Vice President, Real Estate

This is Tom. We've given a lot of information on Page 9 of the supplemental, which details obviously our future roll-outs. You know the amount of leasing that we've done to date. Look, last year we did about three quarters million square feet of new leasing in our Manhattan office portfolio. We had a very good quarter with 260,000 square feet of leasing. As we move into 2020, you can see just the, the amount of unknowns are shrinking and the amount of space that's targeted for redevelopment where we've completed about 7.6 million square feet, only have roughly 600,000 square feet left within the entire portfolio speaks to as we go forward, less move-out. So we give a lot of detail on Page 9. We're confident in our ability to lease space. We're active right now. We've got active proposals and leases in negotiation across the portfolio. As a reminder, the occupancy is going to be up around from quarter-to-quarter but on an overall trend, we feel confident where we're headed.

John Kim -- BMO Capital Markets. -- Analyst

Yeah, I'm just wondering, I mean, some of your peers. Right. Let's say 5% to 6% vacancy. I think the market overall is probably 8 or 9 and you're consistently above that as far as vacancy rate. When do you get active market or closer to your peers?

Thomas Durels -- Executive Vice President, Real Estate

Look, as I said before, we're going to continue to execute on our program to vacate space and to consolidate smaller spaces in the larger offerings so that we can re-lease those space to better tenants at higher rents. The purpose of providing you the detail on Page 9 gives you, our best look as to what we expect will happen through the end of 2020 as we work our way through the balance of the undeveloped space will be much more towards stabilized portfolio.

John Kim -- BMO Capital Markets. -- Analyst

If I could ask the cash NOI contribution question in a different way, and I appreciate the addition of disclosure you have on Page 6 . But at the beginning of the year, you had $23.5 million of leases that will were to begin to contribute the cash NOI this year. And I realize you're not going to get all of that this year because of the timing of when those leases start. So, for lack of a better word that's a balanced number. But on a cash flow basis, how much of that $23.5 million will you see contributing the cash flow in 2019?

Greg Faje -- Director of Investor Relations

I think if you look at the schedule on page, John, this is Greg. If you look at the schedule on Page 6 there. It is, as you pointed out, the balance number, right? So they, you have to look at it gets realized over the course of the year. So if you are using the December 31st number, we should realize $21 million over the course of the year and then the additional schedule that we've now added in Page 6 will give you some better intends to timing going forward and this clarity will help you.

John Kim -- BMO Capital Markets. -- Analyst

That's for 2019 or 2020?

Greg Faje -- Director of Investor Relations

2019. Yeah.

John Kim -- BMO Capital Markets. -- Analyst

And then final question, maybe for Tony on the Observatory all the additional exhibits [Indecipherable] and 88th floor. How do you think this will impact revenue? Will they justify higher ticket prices or is it just really to make the experience better?

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Well, first of all, it's absolutely I think important to differentiate ourselves from all the other Burj Khalifas that are being put up in the marketplace. Second of all that we have a uniqueness to us which is instilled in everybody's mind, heart, you name it around the world. But finally, I think and most importantly well every single thing that has to do with offense is good for defense. This is offense and we are definitely looking at a much better offering. Let's think of this as the only museum which is open from 8:00 AM to 2:00 AM, 7 days a week in New York City or in the world. It's a museum level installation, again seeing it will be believing it. And we believe this will help us not only maintain but also our goal is to increase revenue. And by the way the increased reasons to come to the building on bad weather days as well.

John Kim -- BMO Capital Markets. -- Analyst

But it won't be a separate ticket price, right? Just an all in one price to see the Observatory and all exhibits?

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

That is correct, although of course as you know, we do offer several different levels of experiences in our ticket pricing, and they will still be the express opportunity to bypass everything and be the -- have the quickest visit. This is part of the of quote the ticket price unquote, you don't do one of the other.

John Kim -- BMO Capital Markets. -- Analyst

Got it. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you, ladies and gentlemen, that concludes our question-and-answer session. I'll turn the floor back to Mr. Malkin for any final comments.

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

So first of all, I want to say that the team has been executing at an extraordinarily high level, continued great leasing, terrific execution on not only the redevelopment of our properties, but the redevelopment of the observatory. Well, all that's up and running. Just really pleased with what we're doing there and hats off to the whole team. Great leasing spreads, net effective rent growth and momentum, which we've seen continue into the third quarter. So we're delivering on our goals and we look forward to the next time we report to on our next quarterly earnings. I very much want to give a last hats off to David. We've taken our hats off so many times. No one has a hat left. We look forward to seeing you all in the months ahead, conferences, NDRs, property tours, calendared for the second half of the year. All the best everybody. Thank you. Sorry for the long call.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Duration: 73 minutes

Call participants:

Greg Faje -- Director of Investor Relations

John Kessler -- President and Chief Operating Officer

Thomas Durels -- Executive Vice President, Real Estate

David Karp -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Anthony Malkin -- Chair and Chief Executive Officer

Jason Green -- Evercore ISI -- Analyst

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Jordan Sadler -- KeyBanc -- Analyst

Blaine Heck -- Wells Fargo -- Analyst

Michael Bilerman -- citigroup -- Analyst

Jamie Feldman -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

John Guinee -- Stifel -- Analyst

John Kim -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

More ESRT analysis

All earnings call transcripts

AlphaStreet Logo