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Ring Energy, Inc. (NYSEMKT:REI)
Q2 2019 Earnings Call
Aug 08, 2019, 12:00 p.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Greetings, and welcome to the Ring Energy, Inc. conference call to discuss the 2019 second-quarter financial and operating results. [Operator instructions] As a reminder, this conference is being recorded. I would now like to turn the conference over to your host, Mr.

Tim Rochford, chairman of the board of directors. Thank you, sir. You may begin.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

Thank you, operator, and I'd like to thank and welcome all listeners for joining us today on our 2019 second quarter and six months financial and operational conference call for Ring Energy. Joining me on the call today in addition to myself, again, Tim Rochford, chairman of the board, will be Kelly Hoffman, our chief executive officer; David Fowler, our president; Randy Broaddrick, our chief financial officer; Danny Wilson, executive vice president of operations; Hollie Lamb, vice president of engineering; and, of course, Bill Parsons, who joins us from investor relations. Today, we will cover the financials and the operations of the second quarter and six months ended June 30, 2019. We will review our results and provide some insight as it relates to the current progress, thus far in the third quarter of '19.

At the conclusion of the review, we will turn the call back over to the operator, and we're going to open it up for any questions that you may have. Now I'm going to ask Randy Broaddrick to give us a review on the financials. Randy?

Randy Broaddrick -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Tim. Before we begin, I would like to make reference that any forward-looking statements, which we may be made during the call, are within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. For a complete explanation, I would refer you to our release issued Wednesday, August 7, 2019. If you do not have a copy of the release, one will be posted on the company website at www.ringenergy.com.

For the three months ended June 30, 2019, the company had oil and gas revenues of $51.3 million, and net income of $12.4 million, as compared to revenues of $29.9 million and net income of $4.7 million in the second quarter of 2018. For the six months ended June 30, 2019, the company had oil and gas revenues of $93.1 million, and net income of $23.5 million, as compared to revenues of $59.8 million and net income of $10.4 million. For the three months period of 2019, the net income includes a pre-tax unrealized gain on hedges of $1.5 million, acquisition-related costs of approximately $600,000, and a deferred tax benefit adjustment of $600,000. Without these items, net income would have been approximately $11.6 million.

The three months period of 2018 net income included a pre-tax unrealized loss on hedges of $1.1 million. Without this item, net income would have been approximately $5.6 million. For the six months period of 2019, the net income includes a pre-tax unrealized gain on hedges of $1.2 million, acquisition-related costs of approximately $4.1 million, and a deferred tax benefit adjustment of $4.5 million. Without these items, net income would have been approximately $21.3 million.

The six months period of 2018 net income included a pre-tax unrealized loss on hedges of $1.9 million and an additional tax provision of $1.2 million. Without these items, net income would have been approximately $16.3 million. For the three months ended June 30, 2019, our oil price received was $56.86 per barrel, a decrease of 8% from 2018. And our gas price received was $0.95 per Mcf, a decrease of 69% from 2018.

On a per BOE basis, the second-quarter 2019 price received was $51.95, a decrease of 9% from the 2018 prices. For the six months ended June 30, 2019, our oil price received was $53.74 per barrel, a decrease of 12% from 2018, and our gas price received was $1.51 per Mcf, a decrease of 53% from 2018. On a per BOE basis, the price received for the six months ended June 30, 2019 was $51.95, a decrease of 9%. And I'll double check that, I apologize.

Production cost per BOE for the three months ended June 30, 2019, decreased to $11.71, as compared to $12.70 in 2018. Production cost per BOE for the six months ended June 30, 2019, decreased to $11.24, as compared to $11.97 in 2018. We are still evaluating the ultimate impact the Wishbone acquisition we'll have on our ongoing production cost per BOE, but we expect it to be at or below our historical average. Most production taxes are based on value of the oil and gas sold, so our production tax expense is directly correlated to the commodity prices received.

Our production taxes as a percentage of revenue remained relatively flat and should continue to be. Our total depreciation, depletion and amortization, including accretion of asset retirement obligation per BOE for the three months ended June 30, 2019 decreased to $15.02 per BOE, as compared to $17.81 per BOE for the same period in 2018. Our total DD&A per BOE for the six months ended June 30, 2019, decreased to $14.99 per BOE, as compared to $17.32 per BOE for the same period in 2018. Depletion calculated on our oil and gas properties subject to amortization constitutes the bulk of these amounts.

As to total amounts, our DD&A increased by approximately 59% for the three months period and approximately 56% for the six months period ended June 30, 2019, versus the comparable period in 2018. Our overall general and administrative expense decreased $1.7 million for the three months ended and $5.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2019, as compared to the same period in 2018. However, we incurred approximately $4.1 million acquisition-related cost during the six months period by which approximately $600,000 was during the three-month period. Without these additional costs, the increases from 2018 are approximately $1.2 million for the three-month period and $1.5 million for the six-month period.

Excluding the acquisition-related costs, our per BOE basis, this equates to an increase of $3.59 in 2018 to $3.96 in 2019 for the three-month period and a reduction from $6.01 in 2018 to $4.12 in 2019 for the six-month period. Second-quarter 2019 development capex was approximately $51 million, along with the approximately $46 million from first quarter of '19, which is supposed to be six months development capex at approximately $97 million. These amounts exclude acquisition-related costs and the incursion or assumption of asset retirement obligation. On a per BOE basis, -- sorry, on a diluted basis, the income per share for the three months ended June 30, 2019, was $0.18 as reported.

Excluding the $600,000 deferred tax benefit, the pre-tax unrealized gain on hedges of $1.5 million, the $600,000 acquisition-related cost included in G&A and the $809,000 noncash charge for share-based compensation, the income would have been $0.17. This is compared to income per share of $0.08 as reported or $0.13 per share, excluding the $1.1 million unrealized loss on hedges, with $2.4 million pre-tax realized loss on hedges and the $1 million noncash charge for share-based compensation in 2018. For the six months ended June 30, 2019, the income per diluted share was $0.36 as reported. Excluding the $4.5 million deferred tax benefit, a pre-tax unrealized gain on hedges of $1.2 million, the $4.1 million acquisition-related cost included in G&A, and the $1.6 million noncash charge for share-based compensation, the income was $0.34.

This is compared to income per share of $0.17 as reported or $0.24 per share, excluding the $1.9 million unrealized loss on derivatives, the $3.9 million realized loss on hedges and the $2.1 million noncash charge for share-based compensation in 2018. As of June 30, 2019, we had $360.5 million of the $425 million borrowing base drawn on our credit facility and had cash on hand of $10.6 million. For the three months ended June 30, 2019, we had adjusted EBITDA of approximately $33.3 million or $0.49 per diluted share, compared to approximately $17.3 million or $0.28 per diluted share for the same period in 2018. For the six months ended June 30, 2019, we had adjusted EBITDA of approximately $57.5 million or $0.87 per diluted share, compared to approximately $36.5 million or $0.61 per diluted share for the same period in 2018.

With that, I'll turn it back to Tim.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

All right, Randy. Thank you, appreciate that. I'm going to ask Kelly to give us a recap on the second-quarter overview and operations. Kelly?

Kelly Hoffman -- Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Tim, and thanks everyone for joining us on the call. In the three months ended June 30, the company drilled 30 new horizontal San Andres wells. Our Central Basin Platform asset, we drilled seven new horizontal wells, five one-mile horizontal wells and two one-and-a-half-mile horizontal wells, and on our newly acquired Northwest Shelf property, we drilled six new horizontal San Andres wells, four one-mile horizontal wells, two one-and-a-half-mile horizontal wells, and we're in the process of drilling two more at the end of the quarter. Of the 13 wells drilled, four were we're waiting on completion and that was Central Basin Platform, and two Northwest Shelf wells; seven were drilled and completed and are in various stages of testing, five on the Central Basin Platform and two on the Northwest Shelf and two were drilled on the Northwest Shelf, completed, finished testing, and had initial potential that is filed.

The first one was Bruce E Gentry Jr 647 A 2H, had an IP of 359 barrels of oil equivalent per day and that calculates to 88 BOE per thousand foot. And the Sooner 662 is the second well A 2H, had an IP of 767 barrels of oil equivalent a day, which is 181 BOE per thousand foot. We are very pleased with the preliminary results we're seeing on the Northwest Shelf and the continued results we're seeing on our Central Basin Platform assets. All our forecasts are based on average type curve IPs of 86 BOE per thousand foot, and the average IP on all of our horizontal wells continues to exceed a 100-plus BOE per thousand foot.

As a result, net production for the second quarter of 2019 was approximately 976,000 BOEs and equates to about 10,725 BOE PD. That's on a per day basis. This is the first time the quarterly operations update combines both the Ring and a newly acquired Northwest Shelf properties. June 2019 average net daily production was approximately 10,800 BOEs per day.

A side note for the investors on the call today, who wanted to know that we had previously reported, if you remember, a differential of approximately $5 per barrel. And, however, July came in into $3, and when we're looking at the snapshot of August up to this point. It is also looking like around $3, maybe slightly less going forward. Here, we're feeling pretty strong about that.

So with that, I'm going to it over to Danny and Hollie to give you some current update on operations in a little more detail on our plan moving forward. Thank you.

Danny Wilson -- Executive Vice President of Operations

All right. Thanks, Kelly, and thanks, everyone for being on the call. I want to start out by giving you an update on the few of our existing wells out in the Delaware Basin. Our Brushy Canyon horizontal wells continue to have impressive production and particularly the Hugin 1H and 2H, which are located in our Northeast part of our acreage.

They continue to produce at a combined rate of 350 barrels of oil per day and 2.3 million cubic feet of gas. Since the beginning of the year, these two wells have combined production of over 105,000 BOE, of which 80% is oil. On our North Gaines acreage, our two horizontal San Andres wells, the Ellen B. Peters number 3H and number 4H continue to produce at a combined rate of 150 barrels of oil per day.

To update you on our Q3 activity, we are currently drilling our sixth and final well of the quarter. We should be finishing it up by the middle of this month. All the wells drilled this quarter, as well as those planned for next quarter have been drilled on our newly acquired Northwest Shelf acreage. We are drilling this area for two reasons, the first being that we have fulfilled our drilling obligations on the Central Basin Platform for the year, and the second reason is due to the early results we are seeing on the Northwest Shelf.

As Kelly mentioned, our first two wells on the Northwest Shelf, IP at 359 and 767 BOE per day, results like this are exactly why we bought the Wishbone acreage. The acquisition checks every box we are looking for in the project area. It's a conventional reservoir over the dolomite. That's a dolomite and not a shale.

It's had a shallow depth of approximately 6,000 feet. It has low development cost and yields high returns, and most importantly, it has plenty of running room. As pleased as we are with our CBP properties, we are even more encouraged by the early results we are seeing on the Northwest Shelf, and that is why we plan to do the bulk of our drilling in this area over the next year. Just to be clear, we are drilling on the Northwest Shelf because the results are exceeding our expectations, and we have fulfilled our obligations for the year on the CBP.

Also, want to walk you through the thought process behind the changes we have made to our 2019 capital spending budget, which we announced in late July. Our main focus was on three key points, as we worked through the revised budget. First, we were concentrated on obtaining cash flow neutrality as quickly as possible. Secondly, we were managing our debt.

And third, maintaining modest year-over-year growth. After closing the Wishbone acquisition early April, we released a preliminary budget of $154 million, which included the drilling of 50 horizontal wells for the year. In the same breadth, we reiterated that this was a preliminary budget and that once we had a chance to operate the properties for a few months, we would release an updated budget, which would likely be higher. Our internal estimates were that we would likely have an increase of around 15%, which would raise our spending for the year to $175 million to $180 million.

Once we took physical control of the properties, we realize there was an even greater backlog of opportunities that needed to be addressed. This was largely due to the lack of capital spending by Wishbone while they were marketing the property and subsequently closing the sale. This lack of spending occurred over a six-month period from October 2018, until the close in early April of this year. Once we evaluated the work that needed to be performed, we realized that most of the work fell into four main categories.

The first was the need to perform workovers on wells, which were shut in, or had reduced production due to scale, iron and sand accumulation in the wellbore. Second, we had wells with ESPs which needed to be properly sized. Third, we had wells, which needed to be converted from an ESP to a rod pump. And fourth, infrastructure projects to increase electrical reliability and the streamlining of the wastewater handling systems to allow for future drilling activity.

As we completed our project evaluation, we could see that if we were to move forward with the original drilling program and perform the additional work we had identified, that the budget was going to increase substantially beyond the anticipated 15%. At that time, we took a step back and looked at our options. We can move forward with the original 50-well drilling program and further increase our budget over the anticipated 50% -- 15%. However, this could have jeopardized reaching two of our three goals that of getting the cash flow neutrality and managing our debt.

Or we could go with the second option and scale back the drilling enough to maintain modest year-over-year growth, get our house in order by working over wells, rightsizing our production equipment either through downsizing of ESPs, or converting the rod pumps where possible. We chose the latter option to ensure that we could meet all three of our stated goals. I'm going to turn the discussion now over to Hollie Lamb, our vice president of engineering, and she's going to go through the reasons and the economics behind performing these workovers.

Hollie Lamb -- Vice President of Engineering

Thanks, Danny. I'd like to focus on the economics of the workovers and optimizations. Let's start with her workovers. The workovers are associated with some type of down hole obstruction in the lateral portion of the wellbore.

These downhole obstructions are not predictable. They cannot be scheduled, and they don't happen on every well. They can be identified by various means, including changing in their production profile. They can consist of a combination of frac sand and scale and that scale can be either iron-based or calcium sulfate.

Based on our experience, these occurrences involving scale obstructions are a single event occurring in a wellbore history. These events happened early in the wells life and are generally associated with the maximum pressure drop from the higher pressure formation to the lower pressure wellbore. These materials can be mechanically drilled out of the wellbore and then the wellbore can be chemically treated. In many cases, these wells returning to a normal production profile after the intervention has taken place.

But in some cases, the production actually exceeds the previous profile. In both areas, we have seen rates of return in excess of 100% with payouts of less than one year. These compare very favorably with our metrics on our new drilled wells. Lets switch gears now and talk about optimization.

Specifically, optimizations of our pumping equipment. Early in the life of a well, we install an electric submersible pump, or ESP, which is sized to move 3,000 to 4,000 barrels of fluid a day. As the well naturally declines, it makes sense to change out these ESPs to smaller ESPs, reducing the horsepower draw electrical demand, and also, extending the run time of the pump since it reduces the wear and tear on the right size pump. Eventually, these wells will decline to a point where it makes sense to replace the ESP with a rod pump.

Once this occurs, we see tremendous benefit. The continued reduction in LOE as much as 50% due to electrical usage. So we also have substantial reduction in equipment maintenance, as well, since now most of the pumping equipment is located on the surface as opposed to being downhole. The aforementioned benefit are equipped by the reduced cost on pulling these wells going forward.

A typical pulling job for a repair on an ESP runs around $200,000 to $250,000. A typical repair job on a rod pump is between $20,000 and $40,000. This translates into an 80% reduction every time we work on that well. The initial conversion to rod costs between $150,000 to $250,000.

This translates to an LOE savings every month and a lowered cost on well servicing going forward. This conversion pays out the first time we pull a well. The lower LOE extends the economic life of the well, and by extension, adds economic reserves. Based on these benefits, that we have laid out for both the workovers and optimizations, there is no doubt this is a right decision and will return dividends tomorrow and for many years to come.

At this point, I would like to hand it back to Danny to wrap up the operational update.

Danny Wilson -- Executive Vice President of Operations

Thank you, Hollie. To recap our budget discussions, we started with three key goals. First, reaching cash flow neutrality as quickly as possible. Second managing our debt and third, still maintaining modest year-over-year growth.

In early April, we took over physical control of the Wishbone property. We immediately started drilling on the property and issued a preliminary budget. We analyzed the properties, identified the opportunities in four key areas; first, being the working over of underperforming wells; second, rightsizing of existing ESPs to lower cost; third, converting to rod pumps where possible, thereby reducing lifting costs, which yields increased EURs and most importantly, drastically reduce its future pulling cost, which ultimately reduces future capex and future LOE; and four, performing infrastructure projects to streamline water handling and facilitate future drilling. And finally, in late July, we issued a revised budget, which lowered our capex and greatly increased the certainty that we could meet all three of our key goals.

And with that, I'm going to turn it over to David to cover our leasing and merger and acquisition discussion.

David Fowler -- President

Thank you, Danny. As you are all aware, we've had an active and exciting second quarter with the acquisition of the Wishbone assets that was truly transitionary for Ring as it doubled the size of the company. The assets were perfect fit for our core asset base and established Ring as a consolidator on the platform and now and on the shelf. Besides being a great acquisition for Ring, we were able to buy the assets during a distressed oil market, or what we refer to as a buyer's market for a price that was essentially a PDP value.

In short, these assets are going to provide Ring and our shareholders a lot of value and growth for years to come. Regarding our leasing. Since we now have an acreage position of a platform in shelf of almost 120,000 net acres, our leasing activity are somewhat limited and more concentrated in a few target areas on both the platform and the shelf, that is mostly focused on grossing up our net acres positions, offsetting our upper-tier locations. The land department has done an excellent job at simulating the Wishbone leases into our system, while they were diligently to stay ahead of operations and the drilling rig program.

Regarding A&D, since beginning of the year, numerous companies have taken their assets to market across the Permian and elsewhere and have had failed sales indicating that we're still in a retracted A&D. The bid ask from buyers and sellers continues to be significant enough to make it difficult to get deals across the finish line. Hopefully soon, we will see the market conditions improve, and we'll see the door open to more M&A activity. With our ongoing efforts to differentiate ourselves from the nonconventional shale operations in the Permian -- our operators in the Permian, what I've referred to is being in the shadow of the shales, we are attending several conferences and NDRs between now and the end of the year to tell our story.

I hope that I'll see a lot of you there. And with that, I'll turn it back over to Tim for closing comments.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

All right. Thank you, David, and Danny, and Hollie, and Kelly, and Randy. Good job, guys, reviewing everything. So now, I think what we'll do is just turn it over to the operator, because this will now officially conclude the 2019 second quarter and six months review.

So operator, I'll turn it back to you, and let's open it up for questions that they may have?

Questions & Answers:

Operator

[Operator instructions] Our first question comes from John White with ROTH Capital. Please state your question.

John White -- ROTH Capital Partners -- Analyst

Good morning, and congratulations on a very solid quarter.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

Thank you, John.

John White -- ROTH Capital Partners -- Analyst

I really appreciated Hollie's detail on the workovers and the pump optimization. That was great new information. So now you're on a one-rig program and you're going to do a lot of rework and refurbs on existing wells, you say on both on the Northwest Shelf and the Central Basin. Do you have a split of how that -- how many on each of those properties?

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

In terms of the workover and rod conversions, John?

John White -- ROTH Capital Partners -- Analyst

Yes, what's the workovers between the Shelf and the Central Basin?

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

Yeah. Danny and Hollie?

Danny Wilson -- Executive Vice President of Operations

You bet. John, that's great question. Now it's really almost about a 50-50 split. So there is not either area that really is outshining the others as far as what needs to be done.

Again, our main focus on the Central Basin Platform is the rod conversions. Those are a little elder properties. They've been producing longer, and we're diligently working on getting those converted over. Up on the Northwest Shelf, it's more of a combination of the two things -- well, three things, the ESP is making -- not sure those are the rod size, cleaning out the wellbores and returning those to production and then the rod conversions.

So the money is pretty evenly split, but there's a little bit of difference between the two areas as far as the work that's being done.

John White -- ROTH Capital Partners -- Analyst

I appreciate that. Makes sense on the Central Basin going to mostly rods due to the age. And then, Kelly, did you mention what production was during the month of July?

Kelly Hoffman -- Chief Executive Officer

No. I did not. John, I think, what was referenced in July was the differential that we were seeing for July. It was.

John White -- ROTH Capital Partners -- Analyst

OK. Thanks a lot. I'll turn it back to you.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

Thanks, John.

Operator

Our next question comes from Jason Wangler with Wunderlich Securities. Please state your question.

Jason Wangler -- Wunderlich Securities -- Analyst

Good morning, guys. You mentioned in the prepared remarks about moving to the Northwest Shelf in the rest of this year. As you look at the program, and that's a one-rig program next year, could you maybe talk about how you kind of see the -- your activity between the two properties?

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

Sure. Danny, you guys want to grab that?

Danny Wilson -- Executive Vice President of Operations

Yes, you bet. Down on the -- to start out with on the Central Basin Platform, the focus -- most of our drilling is focused in the area that we recently purchased from Tessara on University Lands's acreage down there. We did that acquisition wrap before the Wishbone acquisition. With the University Lands, we have a minimum footage that we have to drill.

So next year, it looks like we're probably going to need to drill about eight to nine wells down there, and so that's what we'll do in that area and then the rest of the wells. And we haven't come up with the final number yet, but it's probably going to be in the 30-ish range. That will be -- that includes the eight wells on the CBP. But something in that range will probably be, the remainder those will be up on the Northwest Shelf.

Jason Wangler -- Wunderlich Securities -- Analyst

OK. I appreciate it. Thank you.

Operator

Our next question comes from Neal Dingmann with SunTrust Robinson Humphrey. Please state your question.

Neal Dingmann -- SunTrust Robinson Humphrey -- Analyst

Tim, maybe for you or Kelly, I mean, I don't need anything too specific here. I'm just wondering could you give sort of how you all view the magnitude or list the potential of the noncore asset sales? And, I guess, where I'm going with that is I'm just wondering sort of general levels, if some sale, maybe once you give that answer, how that might play into, if you would think about going into a second rig or so because obviously, your -- you're obviously, very cognizant of as you said, we are not going too high on the debt. So just wondering, based on what you tell us the magnitude or potential timing of these other noncore sales. The second part of that question will be, how that could play into potential second rig for the program sometime next year?

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

You bet, certainly. Well, there's no question between the platform and now the Northwest Shelf, we have plenty to do for years to come, even with -- if you were to deploy multiple rigs. So that reshifts the focus back to what about Delaware. The Delaware is a fine asset, but really it has taken second or third place in terms of the line items of priority.

So one would seem to think is, is that an opportunity to possibly move off and prove the balance sheet, add some cash available for future acceleration, etc, etc, etc, and the answer to that is likely, yes. But there was no official marketing effort at this time, as it relates to the production profile. There has been some thought given to the midstream on the SWD site. In fact, we had conversations with interested parties, but we've done nothing yet as an official move.

But that's something we do keep in mind as we go forward. And you're right, Neal, there's two things that would become of that. One is to improve or tidy up the balance sheet and the second, provide a cash cushion, if you will. If, in fact, commodity space improves as we go into next year, accelerate into a second rig would certainly boost that opportunity.

Neal Dingmann -- SunTrust Robinson Humphrey -- Analyst

Pretty good. And then just last one last, probably for Danny, or Hollie. You gave good list of the reasons for the workovers. John, I appreciate that.

I'm just wondering, I mean, I think some thought for Kelly, for any of you all that this was more of a regular item. And I'm just wondering if you could just talk about -- could you see kind of on a go-forward starting next year, and so, when you think about workovers, is this just more on a case-by-case basis? Is it something that you think you'll need more often than not maybe if you could just sort of explain that? I think that would help. Thank you.

Danny Wilson -- Executive Vice President of Operations

Neal, that's a good question. We -- one thing people tend to forget is that we operate over 700 wells. It's not just these few that we continually talk about. So there's always projects to be done.

There's always going to be a certain amount of our budget that's going to be allocated to working on existing wells. And so moving forward, there's always going to be projects. We don't really ever know typically when well is going to go down and need to be worked on. So I think it's going to be this magnitude possibly, but it's not -- probably not as much though because we did have a big backlog that we had to deal with and are still dealing with moving forward.

But I think largely have that handled by the end of the year, moving into next year, I think, should -- I think the pace will slow down and even out a little bit more.

Neal Dingmann -- SunTrust Robinson Humphrey -- Analyst

And if I could sneak one last one and then just based on sort of capex, I know you certainly don't have -- Tim, you and Kelly don't have any guidance out for future capex. But I'm just wondering -- from broad terms, when you think of either workovers and potentially non -- just nontypical D&C is that where the infrastructure. How would you think about the non-D&C spend next year versus this year? I got to think, it's going to be -- it would be down a bit.

Hollie Lamb -- Vice President of Engineering

A bit, is right on. I don't think there's any question. I think Danny did a good job of saying listen, between the backlog that already started to build on the platform, along with the backlog that came along with the inheritance of the Wishbone because of just no activity for a number of months, that is a bit overwhelming, but it's very manageable. Once we catch up with that, as Danny said, I think, as we go into next year, and as Hollie carefully pointed out, you can't predict -- always predict the timing of this and it doesn't happen to every well.

So I think, next year, there's no question as we put out our capex. There's going to be a healthy line item for that type of activity. But I don't think it's going to be anywhere near as -- toward that today in terms of ratio versus drilling and completion.

Neal Dingmann -- SunTrust Robinson Humphrey -- Analyst

Great. Thank you.

Operator

Our next question comes from John Lane with Lane Capital Markets. Please state your question.

John Lane -- Lane Capital Markets -- Analyst

Hey, Tim. How are you?

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

Good, John.

John Lane -- Lane Capital Markets -- Analyst

Congratulations on a fantastic quarter. I'm sure that everybody on this call is smart enough to understand that the stock price nowhere relevant to what's going on internally with the company and the tremendous assets you've built here or continuing to build here. Can you just discuss a little bit about why you think the price of the stock is getting hurt as bad? And may be a little discussion in regards to some of the insider buying that's been taking place that doesn't seem the price anyway.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

Yeah, you bet, John. I'd be happy to remark on that. I think, I'll start off letting Kelly address that, and then I'll follow up.

John Lane -- Lane Capital Markets -- Analyst

Thank you.

Kelly Hoffman -- Chief Executive Officer

John, appreciate it. Look, there's no question that there's been sort of an increased level of shorts and things that are out there in the marketplace, and we've taken note of that. And we've started to talk internally about it, and we've even had some conversations with outside people, but not to a point where, of course, it would be any type of distraction for us. We're maintaining our focus on getting to those items that Danny was talking about in the free cash flow and all that.

But we do keep an eye of those things, and we're taking aggressive approaches to the extent that we can -- and I would say that going forward, I think the combination of that, along with some computer selling, something like that, we've probably been a bit of the victim for that. I would say that looking at it this year, we've taken a lot of aggressive approaches to cost management -- to concepts like this revision on our budget was a very aggressive approach to, again, protecting the balance sheet, getting us the cash flow neutrality, and still showing growth. We're listening to the street closely, and we're trying to pay as much attention to that -- those items as we can, and be very careful and thoughtful about our approach.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

And John, just as a follow-up with reference to your question. So as you know, and as everyone on this call knows, there are times in the life of management and the company during the course of the year, that we have our lockouts, or block-out periods, when it really prevents us from being active at all in the stock. That was a considerable amount of time that took up last year and same is the kind of the case this year. We did have some insider buying, as you know, just a number of weeks ago, and then that window closed very quickly.

I won't elaborate on that, but as David Fowler mentioned in his comments, there are a number of opportunities out there on the platform and on the shelf, and we look at these. And any time, there's any discussions, we're very careful -- from our own internal policies, we're very careful with reference to our own personal activities pertaining to the stock. So right now, there is just absolutely, no question where the stock trades versus our peers -- and I follow probably 35, 40 different companies that are pretty closely, and I think you will look and see 80%, probably closer to 90% of those companies are all trading at 52-week lows. Some of them beat up more than others, and we're in that -- we fall into that category.

But there's no question that the stock in our opinion is grossly undervalued for a number of reasons, and you can do the metrics and figure that out. So whether you're doing multiples or you want to throw out the old NAV style of evaluation, fine, throw it out, but look at the multiples, look at the projected. Just imagine what EBITDA can look like based on this last quarter and going forward. So you start doing some multiples of that, you look at the production profile.

I think everyone would agree that even the absence or factoring in the debt component that -- it's a scream and buy, but enough. Enough of beating that drum. I hope that answers your questions, John.

John Lane -- Lane Capital Markets -- Analyst

Yes, you have always been a shareholder focused, and I know that's never going to change. And I know that sooner or later, the stock price will fetch up, which has really got down. And I just appreciate your constant effort in making this company stronger and better. Thank you.

Thank you, Kelly, too.

Kelly Hoffman -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, John.

Operator

Our next question comes from Mark Levy. Please state your question.

Mark Levy -- Analyst

Thank you. I appreciate the opportunity. Based on the conversation where the Delaware holdings have slipped to a second- or a third-degree priority and mitigating debt is an issue, is there a general sense of the valuation of that Delaware Basin holding, generally?

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

Danny, you might want to reflect on that or Kelly. I think we can all kind of have our opinions of that, but we haven't. Just let me start off by saying, yes, Mark, we have formally started sitting down and drawing circles in terms of where we think of what kind of values. I think we all have ballpark values where that might be, and I don't think we're going to, in this discussion today, talk about those numbers but maybe kind of give an overall feel, thanks.

Maybe, Danny, you could take the first swipe at that?

Danny Wilson -- Executive Vice President of Operations

Well, obviously, we're very happy with the progress -- the area out there. We love the potential for the horizontal Brushy Canyon. We think that has tremendous upside. Unfortunately, it's hard for that area to compete for the dollars, when we're looking at the returns, we're seeing overall in the Northwest Shelf.

Although they are similar, it's still a little bit different. As far as the value of that, I don't know that we really have a feel for what the market value might be. I mean, internally we have reserve values on it obviously. But the market has been all over the place.

With that, I'll let Kelly comment.

Kelly Hoffman -- Chief Executive Officer

I was going to add that when we talk about that asset after people tend to think of it from just an oil and gas standpoint. And, frankly, there is a substantial asset out there, on top of it's called our saltwater disposal system which we have done a great job of building. Hollie and Danny have done a wonderful job with the troops of building that from North to South, creating multiple redundancies. And, frankly, we've had people from private equity standpoint come into our office a number of times over the past two years, actually maybe longer than that, and they turn around a lot of different numbers, Mark.

I mean, you know, I don't know what the value of this today. A couple of years ago, people were tossing around $20 million, $30 million, and $40 million numbers. I couldn't guess what it would be today, but I do believe it would be additive to the concept of the oil and gas sale. If we decide it, it was something that we could market or someone came into the office and threw something at us, that really we couldn't pass up as an idea.

It probably would include an upcharge, so to speak, for that system. So we're hopeful that that maintains that capacity going forward, and we will see what happens.

Mark Levy -- Analyst

Fair enough. Thank you. The only other question I have, and it's probably not fair and it's across all strata. Is there an average general decline curve that would be generally considered appropriate? And I know that's not fair.

I'm curious.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

For the company?

Mark Levy -- Analyst

Yeah.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

Danny, Hollie?

Danny Wilson -- Executive Vice President of Operations

We do have the type curves out on the -- out on our website for each area. So I would just suggest that you look at that.

Mark Levy -- Analyst

Fair enough. Fair enough.

Danny Wilson -- Executive Vice President of Operations

We don't really have a combined company where...

Mark Levy -- Analyst

OK. Thank you.

Operator

Our next question comes from Richard Tullis with Capital One Securities. Please state your question.

Richard Tullis -- Capital One Securities -- Analyst

Thank you. Just one or two quick questions. Maybe more for Danny. What's the outlook, given the one-rig and the planned workovers and swapping out of the pumps? What do you expect the production exit rate 2019 could look like, Danny? And then continue with one-rig into 2020, what do you expect the production growth profile could look like next year?

Danny Wilson -- Executive Vice President of Operations

Yes, I think -- Richard, I think, you know internally we're kind of looking at a number in the mid-11,000 could be a little higher, could be a little lower than that for our exit rate for this quarter. Obviously, drilling fewer wells is going to -- as I've mentioned in my report, we are going to -- we're trying to go from modest growth, but the key focus is still on getting cash flow neutral and managing the debt. So outside that. And I would think next year, you could probably look at anywhere from 3% to 8% increase, something in that range is kind of that's what our models are indicating.

Richard Tullis -- Capital One Securities -- Analyst

And that would be based on one rig, right, Danny?

Danny Wilson -- Executive Vice President of Operations

That will be based on one rig.

Richard Tullis -- Capital One Securities -- Analyst

That's helpful, Danny. And then just lastly, maybe for Tim or Kelly, you stated the target of the free cash flow neutrality by year end this year. Does that hold for next year as well for the full year?

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

It does.

Richard Tullis -- Capital One Securities -- Analyst

OK. All right, well, that's all for me. Thanks so much.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

Thank you, Richard.

Operator

Thank you. [Operator instructions] Our next question comes from Ivan [Inaudible]. Please go ahead with your question.

Unknown speaker

As a follow-up to the gentleman who asked a question about the stock price, can you tell me what the net asset value per share of the company is?

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

The net asset value?

Unknown speaker

Yes.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

Are you basing that on the PV10 of total proved?

Unknown speaker

Yeah, right.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

So Randy, do you have that handy or maybe Hollie, you have that handy? Total proved, combined assets. Randy?

Randy Broaddrick -- Chief Financial Officer

Give me just a moment. OK.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

Ivan, just to be certain, you're making reference to 1P and not 3P? Is that correct?

Unknown speaker

I guess, right? I think, the stock price is pretty ridiculous myself.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

We would agree. When you look on our website, we -- I think, we have a slide, it seems like it maybe number 24, and I think it's in and around that $1.1 billion range, if I'm not mistaken on a PV10 basis.

Unknown speaker

OK.

Randy Broaddrick -- Chief Financial Officer

I don't have that handy.

Unknown speaker

OK.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

I was going to add you if want to -- you want to give consideration to the stock price, of course, when you do that. So I'm sure there's a footnote there on that page which refers to what we used in that calculation.

Unknown speaker

OK. And you had a fine quarter.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

Good to hear that. Thanks, Ivan.

Operator

Thank you. Ladies and gentlemen. There are no further questions at this time. I'll turn it back to management for closing remarks.

Thank you.

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

OK. Thank you, operator. We appreciate it. And thank you, everyone, for taking the time.

We know, again, it's that busy time of the year with a lot of reporting, a lot of other companies having their calls, as well. So thank you, and as always, our door is open. And of course, Bill Parsons, investor relations is happy to hear from you. And we'll look forward to talking to you along the way.

Thank you.

Operator

[Operator signoff]

Duration: 49 minutes

Call participants:

Tim Rochford -- Chairman of the Board of Directors

Randy Broaddrick -- Chief Financial Officer

Kelly Hoffman -- Chief Executive Officer

Danny Wilson -- Executive Vice President of Operations

Hollie Lamb -- Vice President of Engineering

David Fowler -- President

John White -- ROTH Capital Partners -- Analyst

Jason Wangler -- Wunderlich Securities -- Analyst

Neal Dingmann -- SunTrust Robinson Humphrey -- Analyst

John Lane -- Lane Capital Markets -- Analyst

Mark Levy -- Analyst

Richard Tullis -- Capital One Securities -- Analyst

Unknown speaker

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