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Amicus Therapeutics Inc  (NASDAQ:FOLD)
Q2 2019 Earnings Call
Aug. 08, 2019, 8:30 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen, and welcome to the Amicus Second Quarter 2019 Results Conference Call and Webcast. Later, we will conduct a question-and-answer session [Operator Instructions]

I would now like to turn the conference over to your host, Ms. Sara Pellegrino, Vice President of Investor Relations and Corporate Communications, you may begin.

Sara Pellegrino -- Vice President of Investor Relations and Corporate Communications

Good morning. Thank you for joining our conference call to discuss Amicus Therapeutics' Second Quarter 2019, financial results and corporate highlights. Speaking on today's call we have John Crowley, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer; Bradley Campbell, President and Chief Operating Officer and Daphne Quimi, Chief Financial Officer. Also joining for Q&A are Dr. Jay Barth Chief Medical Officer; Dr. Hung Do, Chief Science Officer and Dr. Jeff Castelli, Chief portfolio Officer and Head of Gene Therapy.

As referenced on slide two , we may make forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 relating to our business as well as our plans and prospects. Our forward-looking statements should not be regarded as representation by us that any of our plans will be achieved, any or all of the forward-looking statements made on this call may turn out to be wrong and can be affected by inaccurate assumptions we might make or by known or unknown risks and uncertainties. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements, which speak only to the date hereof.

All forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by this cautionary statement and we undertake no obligation to revise or update this presentation and conference call to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof. For a full discussion of such forward-looking statements and the risks and uncertainties that may impact them, we refer you to the forward-looking statements and risk factors section of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and the quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2019 to be filed today.

At this time, it is my pleasure to turn the call over to John Crowley, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. John?

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Great. Thanks, Sara, and welcome everyone to our second quarter 2019 results conference call. I'm pleased today to host this conference call to describe more fully with our team the great progress that we've made at Amicus during the second quarter and early into the third quarter this year. It was a great quarter for Galafold in what continues to be one of the most successful launches for a rare disease medicine ever. This success for Galafold now puts us on a clear path to achieving our commercial objectives in 2019, but it also lays the foundation for this oral precision medicine to reach as many patients as quickly as possible for many years to come. Galafold continues to be the cornerstone of our success at Amicus and it will also support the advancement of our robust pipeline, including AT-GAA for Pompe disease and what is now the industry's largest rare disease gene therapy portfolio, which are all highlighted on slide three.

So let me go through the highlights here. First, there has been continued strength in global revenue and adoption for Galafold with Q2 being the highest quarter of growth since launch. We are reiterating our full year guidance of $160 million to $180 million and we announced this morning that we now expect to surpass our target of 1,000 patients on Galafold well before the end of this year. All of the global launch metrics that we track are on target or exceeding target, including new patient starts, compliance and adherence to therapy, reimbursement and access, new country approval and the broadening prescriber base among others. Specifically with respect to compliance and adherence, we continue to see exceptionally high rates with Galafold continuing now at more than 90% globally, indeed the vast majority of patients who have gone on to Galafold remain on Galafold, for several years now in some cases.

We have also captured 24% of the global market share of treated amenable Fabry patients with an increasing proportion of previously untreated patients now driving that growth, which Brad will cover further in this call. Second highlight is the momentum with the enrollment in the opening of new sites in our Global Pompe pivotal study, known as the PROPEL study and now with the majority of patients enrolled in this PROPEL study, we are well on track to complete enrollment by year-end. Third, we just last week announced the positive two-year interim clinical results for our CLN 6 Batten disease gene therapy showing the potential to halt the progression of a devastating fatal neurologic disease in children. Next is the expanded Penn Collaboration, which we announced in Q2 and which we will also highlight in this call today.

Again, this provides Amicus with the industry's largest rare disease gene therapy portfolio, including the majority of all lysosomal disorders and more prevalent rare diseases through this collaboration with UPenn. And finally I'll highlight the strength of our balance sheet, which we added to in Q2 with the $200 million equity financing to further advance our portfolio and add important new investments in biologics and gene therapy manufacturing while providing cash runway into 2021. And in addition,, as we highlighted in the press release this morning, we have entered into an agreement with Ultragenyx to in-license exclusive Japanese rights to Mepsevii for MPS VII for rare lysosomal disorder in Japan.

There is true alignment here between both Amicus and Ultragenyx in the best interest of people living with MPS VII in Japan, where we believe that we can leverage our existing Amicus infrastructure, relationships and experience in clinical development, regulatory approvals and commercialization within the lysosomal disorders and I'll highlight that further on this call.

So with that overview, let me go ahead and hand the call over to Bradley Campbell, our President and Chief Operating Officer, to highlight the very successful Galafold launch that continues. Brad.

Bradley L. Campbell -- President and Chief Operating Officer

Great. Thank you, John. Good morning, everyone. Let me begin on slide five, with our snapshot of the Galafold launch through June 30. We remain very pleased with the strong revenue growth this quarter, adoption and launch trajectory of Galafold and as John noted, Galafold continues to be one of the most successful rare disease drug launches ever and we're confident that this strength will continue throughout the remainder of 2019 and beyond,. Our second quarter revenue was $44.1 million, which is a year-over-year increase of approximately 107% from the second quarter of 2018. This is the highest quarter of growth since launch. We continue to see exceptionally strong momentum in new countries, including the US and Japan as well as in our earlier launch countries. We have pricing and reimbursement secured in 24 countries around the world.

And following the recent approval in Argentina, we're now preparing to launch in our first ever market in Latin America, which is a very important geography for us where we see the potential to deliver Galafold to many more Fabry patients living with amenable mutations. Additionally, we see continued strength of the approved Galafold label with 348 amenable variants included in the US and 367 amenable mutations in Europe with most other labels based on the MAA submission in the EU and remember we had around 260 mutations in the original European label. So we've added almost 100 new mutations to the label since launch, and that number should continue to grow. Moving now to slide six. I'll provide a little bit more detail on the positive momentum across all key global commercial metrics we're focusing on in this quarter.

At the global level, we estimate Galafold now has approximately 24% global market share of treated amenable patients, which is up from 18% in the first quarter as we continue to add new switch patients as well as previously untreated patients to Galafold. Next, as John mentioned, compliance and adherence to this oral precision medicine continue to exceed 90% globally. This is really important and we think continues to reflect that physicians and patients are having a strong experience with Galafold. In the United States, we're now approaching a year into the launch and continue to see steady growth from a widening prescriber base of now more than 100 physicians.

We also see continued broad reimbursement coverage along with a shorter time from prescription to patients receiving drug. In our international markets, we continue to see strong growth from the EU 5 countries as well as significant contribution from smaller and mid-sized markets like Australia, Canada, the Nordics and beyond. And in Japan, we're on track to deliver all of our full year objectives as well. Globally, we're also very encouraged by the increasing contribution from previously untreated patients, which are now breaking out here for the first time. As of June 30, on a global basis 64% of patients on Galafold had switched from enzyme replacement therapy and 36% were not previously treated. Again, this trend is right on target with our strategy for higher initial adoption in switch patients at launch followed by increasing penetration into the population of diagnosed untreated patients.

So with the introduction of Galafold to the treatment armamentarium for Fabry disease, we now have grown the treated population by hundreds of patients. In the medium term, we see this mix approaching 50/50 between switch and previously untreated patients and in the longer term, we think the vast majority of Galafold patients could actually have been treatment-naive prior to the launch of Galafold. We believe that this trend reflects the shifting paradigm globally, where Galafold is increasingly becoming a first-line standard of care treatment for Fabry patients with amenable mutations. And let me just finish by reiterating that new patient starts continue to be very strong and we now expect to exceed our target of 1,000 patients on Galafold well before year-end. Let me turn now to slide seven, and I'll comment on our quarterly revenue. Just as we saw in 2018, the first half of 2019 has been in line with our expectations for moderate growth in the first quarter and higher growth in the second quarter. Again, these trends are consistent with Galafold adoption and ordering patterns that we've seen over the past few years.

And while we don't give quarterly guidance, I'll note that as in previous years, we do continue to expect Galafold revenue to reflect non-linear growth in the summer months with those 90-day orders of this oral precision medicine placed before vacation and holidays, especially in Europe, and we expect growth to pick up again in the fourth quarter this year. Turning now to our guidance on slide eight. With the strength in the commercial metrics I just described, we remain highly confident in our guidance range of $160 million to $180 million for the year. Given the strong trajectory to-date, we now expect again we'll hit that 1,000 plus patient target well before the end of 2019.

And as we highlighted on last quarter's call, and we will reiterate again today, with the majority of our sales continuing to come from outside the United States, we do expect modest foreign exchange headwinds throughout the rest of the year, which we think puts us in the reportable revenue range in the middle of this $160 million to $180 million guidance range. With this strong momentum, we also remain very confident that Galafold will achieve $500 million in sales globally by 2023. And finally on slide nine, we continue to believe that Fabry disease may be one of the most under and misdiagnosed human genetic disorders in the world.

With the potential to reach $1 billion of sales in peak for Galafold, the global Fabry market was about $1.4 billion last year, we continue to grow as expected in the Fabry population, particularly through the increase of newborn screening and other diagnostic initiatives, which we are continuing to invest in, as well as recent extension of our Galafold IP that now covers treatment methods through the year 2038. We're even more confident in the potential to impact thousands of people living with Fabry disease are amenable to this novel precision medicine.

So with that, let me turn the call back to John to discuss our AT-GAA program in Pompe, as well as our gene therapy portfolio. John?

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Great. Thanks, Bradley. So here on slide 11, as we look to our Pompe program, I'd like to take a moment to highlight AT-GAA and the PROPEL study as shown in this schematic on this slide, which is now being studied, more than a majority enrolled to include both ERT-switch and ERT-naive patients. There has been great interest from patients and physicians and growing momentum here, especially following the two-year data presented at the World Symposium earlier this year, as well as the breakthrough therapy designation or BTB granted by the US FDA in the first quarter for AT-GAA and late-onset Pompe disease.

This is the first second generation therapy as well as the first therapy for Pompe disease ever to receive this important BTD designation with several key features as outlined on this slide. Moving to slide 12, let me highlight here the very successful execution of our Amicus teams around the world in enrolling the pivotal PROPEL study. We are now active in 29 countries. We plan to include all leading global Pompe treatment centers to ensure a broad depth of physician and patient experience around the world. We are on track to complete enrollment by year end with top line data targeted for the first half of 2021. The PROPEL study together with the ongoing Phase 1/2 study support our strategy to advance AT-GAA as quickly as possible with the potential, we believe, to become the new standard of care for people living with Pompe disease.

As a reminder, our base case remains that the pivotal PROPEL study will be the basis together with additional data that we've collected in the Phase 1/2 study to support the full approval of AT-GAA. On slide 13, I'll summarize the key accomplishments for the AT-GAA program in 2019 and reiterate a number of our objectives. Year-to-date, we have presented additional Phase 1/2 data up to 24 months. Again, earlier this year at the World Symposium in Orlando, we were granted BTD and we have passed the halfway mark on target enrollment in our pivotal study. For the remainder of this year, we are on track to achieve target enrollment in the PROPEL study, we also plan to present six-month safety and functional data from most all of the patients in the fourth cohort as well as the complete 24-month data from our first three cohorts in our Phase 1/2 study at the World Muscle Society in Copenhagen in early October. We're also on track to report natural history data this year.

We continue to plan supportive studies, including the initiation of our important pediatric study, which we expect to begin in the second half of this year and on the manufacturing front, an important use of proceeds from our recent equity financing is to accelerate the agreed upon CMC requirements and the very important related manufacturing work together with our partners at WuXi Biologics. And while we engage with regulators frequently, I'll remind everybody that we will not be providing any color or expectations on any pending or future regulatory interactions until after they have occurred and only if they materially impact our assumptions from our base case. We continue to be extremely excited about AT-GAA as well as our preclinical Pompe gene therapy program to build what we believe could be the largest and most valuable franchise in the industry with the potential to offer solutions to all patients living with Pompe disease globally. Moving to slide 14. Let me provide some more color on our recent deal with Ultragenyx, where again we have in-licensed exclusive Japanese rights to Mepsevii for MPS VII in Japan.

There is true alignment here again between both Amicus and Ultragenyx in advancing a treatment and in the best interest of MPS VII community in Japan. With our existing Amicus infrastructure, relationships and experience in clinical development, regulatory approvals and commercialization in the lysosomal field, we believe we can leverage our experience in Galafold commercialization in Fabry and Pompe clinical development to support what is a very small number of patients in an investigator-sponsored study. This small study in Japan together with the existing data package from previously completed clinical studies that has supported Mepsevii approvals in other countries is expected to support a J-NDA submission. There is no upfront payment here and there will be no material impact to our budget assumptions to bring forward this new program, which we believe has the potential to make a very meaningful impact for people living with MPS VII in Japan. I commend Dr. Emil Kakkis and the team at Ultragenyx for their unwavering commitment to the highest quality science and to patients and we're happy to be their partner for this mission in Japan.

Moving on now to slide 16. I'll highlight here our industry-leading portfolio of gene therapies for rare diseases which we've assembled in less than a year to combine the leading gene therapy technologies, products and minds in this field. We added significantly to this portfolio during the second quarter with the expanded agreement with Dr. Jim Wilson and the University of Pennsylvania that's detailed on slide 17. As you'll see here on slide 17, this expanded collaboration with UPenn reflects the extraordinary scientific capabilities at Amicus as well as the success that we have seen with the work that we have done already in collaboration with Dr Wilson and his team at UPenn. Underlying this collaboration is the guiding objective to combine the Amicus protein engineering platform with the Penn gene transfer technologies and capabilities to replicate the initial preclinical success we've had so far with preclinical proof-of-concept for our gene therapy and Pompe disease.

Again, there are three elements to this collaboration, first, Amicus acquired the right to a majority of all lysosomal disorders for all next generation Penn gene therapy technologies. Second, the existing collaboration, which we announced in October of 2018 has now been expanded from 3 to 6 immediate programs for rare genetic diseases. With the extension of the agreement and existing programs in Pompe disease, Fabry disease and CDKL5 deficiency disorder, we now add these diseases: Niemann-Pick Type C, MPSIIIB, as well as the next generation program for MPSIIIA and finally, the third element of this program is the next generation research agreement here. This provides Amicus with exclusive disease specific worldwide rights to collaborate with the gene therapy program at Penn, to develop potentially disruptive new gene therapy platform technologies and programs for 12 additional pre-specified rare diseases, including more prevalent rare disorder populations such as Rett syndrome, Angelman Syndrome, Myotonic dystrophy and select other muscular dystrophies, where in many cases we can incorporate the Amicus protein engineering expertise in targeting mutations to enable cross correction to many of them while also utilizing Penn's next generation gene delivery technology. Turning now to slide 18, in addition to the significant momentum across all of our Penn programs, we also reported our first set of clinical data for our gene therapy platform licensed from Nationwide Children's.

The details of this data set were highlighted in a press release and conference call last week, but I'll briefly highlight the 5 key takeaways that give us great excitement in the potential for our gene therapy for CLN6 Batten disease as well as our broader platform of intrathecal AAV gene therapies. First, is the meaningful impact that we saw in motor and language function again in children with this fatal neurologic disease that robs them rapidly of their ability to walk, speak, see and think. Second is the evidence now of disease stabilization in 7 out of the 8 children with data at up to approximately 2 years post gene transfer. Third, is the newly available data on an untreated natural history cohort, where all 14 out of 14 patients progressively lost language and motor function over the same period of time. Indeed, it's remarkable that many of these children treated with gene therapy in our study, continue to be able to walk and speak when the natural history suggests that they would have lost the ability to speak and moved into a wheel chair or have become bedridden. Fourth, is the compelling data comparing siblings living with CLN6 Batten disease, including 3 children treated in the study who had untreated siblings as well as two pairs of siblings that were treated in this study.

And fifth is the favorable safety profile seen with the intrathecal dose of AAV that was administered to all of these patients in the study. We also believe the interim clinical results validate the broad potential of the Amicus intrathecal AAV platform in other forms of Batten disease, including our own gene therapy for CLN3 Batten disease, which is in the clinic, and we remain on track to enroll the high dose cohort and to complete enrollment in this clinical study for CLM3 Batten disease by the end of this year. And, again, as we announced a few weeks ago, we have partnerships now in place with the leading contract manufacturing organizations in gene therapy, in addition to plasma suppliers for our CLN6 gene therapy program and initial clinical and preclinical gene therapy programs.

So with that important summary, let me go ahead now and turn the call over to our Chief Financial Officer. Daphne Quimi, who'll review our second quarter 2019 results, Daphne?

Daphne Queenie -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, John, and good morning everyone. Our financial overview begins on slide 20, with our income statement for the three-month period ending June 30, 2019. For the second quarter of 2019, we achieved Galafold's revenue of $44.1 million, which is 107% increase over the second quarter of 2018. This includes year-over-year operational revenue growth measured at constant currency exchange rates of 115%, offset by a negative currency impact of $1.7 million or 8%. Cost of goods sold includes manufacturing costs as well as royalties associated with the sales of our product. Cost of goods sold as a percentage of net sales was 12.2% in the second quarter of 2019 as compared to 14.7% for the prior year period. Cost of goods sold as a percent of revenue was favorable as Galafold's revenue continues to grow in the United States where we do not owe royalties as well as other countries where we are subject to lower royalties. We continue to make significant investments in R&D and manufacturing with the ongoing pivotal study and commercial scale up in our Pompe program as well as the expansion of our gene therapy portfolio and capabilities.

During the second quarter of 2019, we reported $71 million in R&D expense as compared to $34.7 million for the prior year period. This increase was attributed to investments in our AT-GAA Pompe clinical program as well as the clinical and preclinical gene therapy programs that we added to the pipeline in the second half of last year. Total selling, general and administrative expense for the second quarter of 2019 was $42.6 million as compared to $29.2 million for the prior year period. The increase represents the expanded geographic scope of the ongoing Galafold commercial launch, including launch activities in Japan and the United States. Net loss for the second quarter of 2019 was $84.6 million or $0.36 per share as compared to a net loss of $61.8 million or $0.33 per share for the prior year period. And as of June 30, 2019, we had approximately 254.5 million shares outstanding. Moving on to slide 21, a few comments about our current cash position and 2019 financial guidance. Cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities totaled $575.7 million at June 30, 2019, compared to $504.2 million at December 31, 2018. The current cash position and total shares outstanding are inclusive of the June 2019 equity offering. Looking at the remainder of 2019, we are reaffirming our full year Galafold revenue guidance of $160 million to $180 million. Taking into account our anticipated investments as well as anticipated net cash generated from Galafold revenue, we expect to have approximately $400 million in cash on the balance sheet at the end of 2019.

This projected year-end cash balance reflects all ongoing investments in our operations, including Pompe manufacturing scale-up and facilities including our new Global Research and Gene Therapy Center of Excellence in Philadelphia. With our current cash position and anticipated net cash generated from Galafold revenue, we have sufficient capital to fund ongoing operations into 2021. As we have noted in the past, potential future business development collaborations, pipeline expansion and investment in manufacturing capabilities may impact our future capital requirements. This summarizes our key financials for the second quarter of 2019. Additional details can be found in our quarterly report on Form 10-Q. I'm happy to address any questions during the Q&A, but for now I'll turn it back to John.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Great. Thank you, Daphne. I'll conclude this morning's call by highlighting the five key strategic priorities on slide 23 that we outlined at the beginning of the year, which we are on track to meet or exceed. First, with the strength of our global launch of Galafold, we again are highly confident in our full year 2019 guidance range of $160 million to $180 million. Second, Pompe and our AT-GAA program continue to be a top priority now with the majority of patients enrolled in our PROPEL pivotal study and with new data from our Phase 1/2 clinical study to be presented at the World Muscle Society in October. Third, we already reported the positive interim clinical data in CLN6 batten disease clinical study and we remain on track to fully enroll for CLN3 Batten disease study this year. Our fourth goal is to achieve preclinical proof-of-concept for our Fabry gene therapy program as well as additional preclinical data for our Pompe gene therapy program.

This Pompe gene therapy program is advancing ahead of schedule and we anticipate selection of a clinical candidate in 2019 to move into IND enabling studies. And finally, we are committed to maintaining our financial strength. Our cash runway is sufficient to fund our operating plan into 2021, advancing us several years closer toward our 2023 vision to treat 5,000 patients and to achieve $1 billion plus in global revenue. And then on slide 24, a snapshot of the many milestones already achieved so far with many more to come throughout the remainder of this year.

So with that, operator, I'll hand the call back to you for Q&A. Thank you.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Your first question comes from the line of Anupam Rama from JPMorgan. Your line is now open.

Anupam Rama -- JP Morgan -- Analyst

Hey guys thanks so much for taking my question and congrats on all the progress here. I was wondering if we could just revisit the CLN6 update from last week and we've gotten this question a couple times after the uptake, can you remind us of the scope of the natural history update we'll be getting later this year and how should we be thinking about the age distribution in that natural history data set? Thanks so much.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Sure. Thanks, Anupam. I will ask Jay Barth, our Chief Medical Officer, to handle that.

Jay A. Barth -- Chief Medical Officer

Right now, we have the natural history data we presented on approximately 14 patients, that will continue to the data set for now, as we continue to expand that natural history data. That's a process that will happen over time. So it's hard to pin down exactly when we'll have larger numbers on that, but from the natural history data that we have currently there is a clear overlap of the ages of the patients in the treated cohort versus the natural history cohort, that's the basis of the comparison that we showed between the two in which all 14 of the natural history patients declined at least 2 points on reverse as opposed to just 1 of the 8 treated patients over approximately two years, a clear differentiation. [Speech Overlap] two points on reverse as opposed to just one of the eight treated patients over approximately two years, a clear differentiation. [Speech Overlap]

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Maybe Jay will also comment on the ages that we expect in any future natural history study.

Jay A. Barth -- Chief Medical Officer

And it will be a broad range of ages. As we have now, the 14 natural history data that we have now covers a broad age range as similar to the treated patients and that will continue to be the case in the larger expanded natural history data set once we have that assembled.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

But it will also include quite a number of younger children as well.

Jay A. Barth -- Chief Medical Officer

Yes, there's a whole younger children as well.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Anupam, does that make sense?

Anupam Rama -- JP Morgan -- Analyst

Great. Thanks so much for taking my questions. Thank you very much.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Ritu Baral from Cowen. Your line is now live.

Ritu Baral -- Cowen -- Analyst

Hey, guys, thanks for taking the question and congrats on the update. Can I just start with some of the marketing strategies for Galafold? Now that your percentage of naive patients, seems to be growing and picking up momentum, is there a profile of these sort of early adopter treatment-naive patients and are you doing anything to specifically target that population, given that they're going to be the ones to sort of likely sustain growth in the forward years.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Bradley, please.

Bradley L. Campbell -- President and Chief Operating Officer

Sure, yeah, couple things. Thanks for the question. So, yes, as a reminder, this is exactly the strategy that we outlined at launch, which is focused on switch patients first, that are already getting -- they're coming in able to take their infusions or getting reimbursed for Fabry disease and that's the pattern that we've seen in most markets. And then in the sort of medium longer-term start to see pickup in the diagnosed untreated patients, certainly that's part of our strategy. A couple of things to remember, outside the United States, it really has to go through the physician population. So I think they're part of what you're seeing is as the physicians get more comfortable in treating their patients, they are more and more willing to put naive patients on. There is also a phenomenon where you have family members. This is because it's an disease, you often have 4 or 5 diagnosed family members.

And so we're seeing more and more siblings or parents and children coming on for therapy as one family member has a positive experience. So I think there's definitely and it's kind of an organic growth going on there. And in the United States, of course, you do have a different ability to educate patients and so we're doing what I think many others in the industry do, in terms of having educational meetings with physicians and patients. And I think that's the way to provide a more -- a direct education, if you will, and all of those things I think together and in particular, I think the positive experience that we can infer from the high compliance and adherence rates, I think just gives the diagnosed untreated population more and more confidence in coming on to Galafold.

Ritu Baral -- Cowen -- Analyst

Would it be as you move forward, are you targeting maybe patient groups more or sort of patient awareness campaigns or something like that?

Bradley L. Campbell -- President and Chief Operating Officer

I think in the United States, we're certainly doing that, the compliance and regulatory framework outside the US prevents you from going directly to patient groups with that kind of information, but in the US, yes we are.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

And you had asked --

Bradley L. Campbell -- President and Chief Operating Officer

Ritu, around are there specific kind of patients we're targeting, I mean, look, there are -- what we've estimated in almost all of our major markets is there is a roughly equal number of diagnosed untreated patients. So, very clearly, there are patients out there who need the treatment guidelines, who should be on treatment for whatever reason we're choosing not to and we think that a small molecule like Galafold with the growing body of evidence, real world treatment evidence becomes more and more appealing to that population.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Again, Ritu, just add to that, we think with this treatment-naive population increasingly be an important part of the Galafold adoption. In addition to this already diagnosed but untreated patients, it's also the newly diagnosed patients and also mis-diagnosed patients, people just discovering that they have Fabry disease and there we're beginning pilot studies to look into IBS clinics, multiple sclerosis clinics where you see high rates of misdiagnosis for what is actually Fabry we believe. So I think lots more potential there and again in line with the product characteristics of Galafold, the high adherence compliance rates and the increasing awareness that Fabry disease really is one of the largest human genetic disorders.

Ritu Baral -- Cowen -- Analyst

And then, so many questions, I'm going to be picky here, can you go over for us the statistics around the PROPEL study, especially around superiority. Just can you confirm that the comparison is -- if it's to baseline or across arms and then what are your powering assumptions?

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Sure. I'm not sure what we've disclosed publicly, but I'll let Jeff speak to that. Jeff is in our Gene Therapy Center of Excellence & Research Center down in Philadelphia with Hung. So Jeff, I'll let you speak to, why this study is so well powered?

Jeffrey P. Castelli -- Chief Portfolio Officer and Head of Gene Therapy

Sure. Thanks, John, and thanks Ritu for the question. So the power for PROPEL, it's approximately 100 patient study. It is stratified by naive and switch and it's two to one stratification within naive and switch, AT-GAA to standard of care ERT. The powering assumptions were based on our Phase 1/2 study data on on 6-minute walk in both switch and naive patients, where we looked at our effect that we had in our treated patients, we compared that to what's been reported out in the medical literature for patients either starting on standard of care or treated longer term with standard of care, which would be comparable to the switch patients and based on that we came up with a set of assumptions that gave us over 90% power to show superiority for AT-GAA versus standard of care on 6-minute walk.

Ritu Baral -- Cowen -- Analyst

So it's across arm comparison not compared to baseline?

Jeffrey P. Castelli -- Chief Portfolio Officer and Head of Gene Therapy

Correct. So in a way, we would be looking as each patients change from the time they start the study to complete 12 months, but then you're actually comparing across treatments. You are looking at the relevant change from start of treatment to end for each patient.

Ritu Baral -- Cowen -- Analyst

And then, sorry, one last very quick question for Daphne. Daphne, I think across all of my rare disease companies. I feel like you guys have been hit most by ForEx and it might tie into the uptake, the very, very robust uptake you guys have had in the UK and the pound in Brexit and your headquarters, any impact that we should be thinking about through the end of the year in case you actually know what's going on?

Daphne Queenie -- Chief Financial Officer

Well, yeah, I mean, foreign currencies are very hard to forecast and predict, but we do have a very large percent of our revenue comes from euro-based and pound-based transactions. So that's why we seem to be hit as you said, on a larger part with the foreign currency. We do have a natural hedge in the UK, because our headquarters are there. So on a net P&L basis, there is a natural hedge there. We do have a larger exposure on the euro on a net P&L basis. But again, it's driven by the fact that a larger portion of our business right now is outside the US.

Ritu Baral -- Cowen -- Analyst

And any potential business disruption with potential Brexit given the headquarters?

Daphne Queenie -- Chief Financial Officer

No, we've already put our plans in place. So we are prepared for whichever eventuality Brexit ends up, whether it's a smooth transition or if it's a hard Brexit, we are prepared.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. We spend a lot of time on that, Ritu. So we're going to be in really good shape there.

Ritu Baral -- Cowen -- Analyst

Great. Thanks for taking all the questions.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Of course. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Your next question comes from the line of Tazeen Ahmad from Bank of America. Your line is now live.

Tazeen Ahmad -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Good morning guys. Thanks for taking my questions. Maybe, John, if we could follow-up on PROPEL again, I know that you said in your prepared remarks that enrollment is going well. What's fully enrolled, can you give us a sense of when that might come out? That's question one. Question two is Sanofi looks like they would be reading out their study, their pivotal study for their follow-on Lumizyme ahead of yours. With that in mind, it seems like they are focusing more on lung function. So their primary endpoint, they are looking at 6-minute walk as a secondary. What do doctors tell you about their preference for looking at lung function versus 6-minute walk and in the event that, let's say, Sanofi is able to show the gist of results for both lung function and 6-minute walk, how do you think that would impact the perception physicians have about unmet need? Thanks.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Sure. Again, we've not done and not compared directly into that GA -- what do they call it, neo-GAA program, that program has been in development for quite some time at Sanofi, their Phase 2 results are known and I'll refer you to that, we think our results certainly for our drug compared quite favorably to what's known about standard of care or any other drug that's ever been in development. So with that said, Jay, I'll turn it to you for -- we spend a lot of time with the KOLs in the world, we see again a tremendous amount of excitement based around the Phase 2 data, that we've shown today. That's quite distinct from any other program including, we believe that Sanofi program in development. So, Jay, do you want to comment on what the doctors say in terms of 6-minute walk versus FDC or other endpoints.

Jay A. Barth -- Chief Medical Officer

Sure. And as you said, John, we have spent a lot of time with the clinical experts in the field in designing the PROPEL study and they are very supportive of the primary endpoint is the 6-minute walk test as are regulators. It's perfectly acceptable to them. We have shown very good data on the 6-minute walk test in our Phase 1/2 study, so that supports that as well, but the 6-minute walk test is not just a measurement of walking ability of ambulation. It really is a comprehensive test that includes pulmonary function, cardiac function as well, as skeletal muscle function. So we think it's a more comprehensive way of looking at the effect of the drug than merely FDC, which is the single element of pulmonary function testing.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Of course, we are doing FDC as well. That's expected by regulators and we're very comfortable with that as well, based on our Phase 1/2 data, but looking at the whole picture, the goal of 6-minute walk test is very good and for our purposes in the PROPEL study, the preferable primary endpoint.

Tazeen Ahmad -- Bank of America -- Analyst

How do you feel about the --

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

No, I just interrupted again to remind everybody, we have a very, very differentiated technology, which we think is a very distinct not only Phase 2 clinical data set, but all the preclinical work both at Amicus and at the NIH, so we remain very, very confident in our approach, but please go ahead. I'm sorry

Tazeen Ahmad -- Bank of America -- Analyst

No. Thanks for that. I just wanted to follow up and ask what your thoughts are without lowering the exact powering of how you're looking at everything, would you at least expect both 6-minute walk and lung function to move in the same direction, even if both of them may not be statistically significant.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, Jay.

Jay A. Barth -- Chief Medical Officer

Generally speaking, they do, we've seen the Phase 1/2 data, and I think that we're looking for a directional similarity on the FDC supportive of the primary endpoint, the 6-minute walk test

Tazeen Ahmad -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Okay great thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Your next question comes from the line of Whitney Ijem from Guggenheim. Your line is now open.

Whitney Ijem -- Guggenheim -- Analyst

Hey. Good morning. Thanks for taking the question. First one, I guess maybe on the Pompe aging therapy setting, you alluded to progress, significant progress on that front, I guess. Is there any color you can give us on where you're headed either vector or modality or motive delivery wise in that program?

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Sure. Thanks Whitney, maybe Jeff and Hung, I'll let you guys comment on what we've developed with Dr. Wilson's lab, the results we've seen. And again, just reiterate that we expect to have all that completed in the second half of this year, ready for the IND enabling studies. So Jeff please.

Jeffrey P. Castelli -- Chief Portfolio Officer and Head of Gene Therapy

Sure, I'll start and then Hung will chime in. So we reported earlier this year at ASGCT our first initial data from our Pompe gene therapy program, where we're combining an Amicus designed Transgene that is really optimized for targeting and cross correction and that novel Transgene was put into the AAVs from Penn, when we put that gene therapy into myosin showed really quite remarkable glycogen reduction in all tissues including in the spinal cord, in the brain which is really important to addressing Pompe. In that study, we delivered that gene therapy just as an IV injection into the mice, so we are really excited to progress that forward, we've said, we are on track to have a clinical candidate selected this year and then quickly move into IND enabling studies.

So right now, in terms of route of administration, it is likely to be systemic, there is a chance we could add in a direct into the CSF administration as well if we need to, there is a chance we think we could adequately target the the CNS also systemically. So that's one of the things we're still working out, but we're really excited of the progress to-date on this approach of really designing the transgene for optimal cross correction and direct transduction with the Penn technologies into all the key tissues as well. So Hung?

Hung Do -- Chief Science Officer

And the only thing I would add to that is on top of what Jeff has said is that we are working actively with Jim's group at UPenn to really develop a good process for manufacturing this material for both the IND TAPP studies further for clinical supply in the future.

Whitney Ijem -- Guggenheim -- Analyst

And then second question from me is just on Mepsevii in Japan, you alluded to the J-NDA what needed to go and did you talk about timelines around that? And in terms of market opportunity there, can you remind us how many patients there are? And then the third part of this one question is should we expect similar type deals going forward as you kind of look to leverage your ex-US commercialization capabilities? Thanks.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Sure. Bradley, you want to take that?

Bradley L. Campbell -- President and Chief Operating Officer

Yes, sure. We're really excited here, I think, from an overall timeline perspective, what we've said is the IAS study is fully enrolled. It's a 52-week study and so the next milestone really would be the J-NDA submission and we'll provide an update on that when it goes in. But the good news is the study is enrolled and so we're waiting to see data there. Just a little bit of an overview of MPSVII, which is the indication for Mepsevii, it's one of the rarest MPS disorder.

So it's only about 200 patients in the developed world, who've been diagnosed and so it's a small population but I think really what it reflects is a great management of the team we've built in Japan, the capabilities from a regulatory and commercial and clinical experience and also I think a great combination between two leading companies of the rare disease space at Ultragenyx and at Amicus. So I wouldn't expect to see more than very modest revenue from this product. But again, because we have the infrastructure in place, it's going to leverage on our side, which we think is great and again it aligns very well with our mission and with Ultragenyx' mission.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

What we do -- to the last part of your question, Whitney, I do expect this to be an example of how Amicus has built an infrastructure, clinical commercial, regulatory in Japan. We've got about 30 full-time Amicus employees now in Japan to demonstrate to potential partners going forward that we may become a partner of choice in the rare diseases with development and/or commercialization of products. In Japan, and we'd expect a similar model to follow potentially in other geographies in the world.

Tazeen Ahmad -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Great, Thank you Operator

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Mike Ulz from Baird. Your line is now open.

Mike Ulz -- Baird -- Analyst

Hi guys. Thanks for taking the question and congrats on the progress as well. I just had a question on Galafold, so you are starting expansion in Latin America with recent approval in Argentina, maybe you can just talk about your broader plans in Latin America? And then secondly, when you start to book revenues in that region? Thanks.

Bradley L. Campbell -- President and Chief Operating Officer

Latin America, as you know, is a really -- it's a large geography, it's an important geography traditionally for the rare diseases, for Fabry disease it's an important part of our development program. The regulatory infrastructure down their timelines has changed in a number of the market, so I think it's taken a little bit longer there. We really see that as kind of a next year and years after growth driver. We do have a handful of patients that we've mentioned before that are on -- naive patient sales in Latin America and we would continue to see that as a modest impact of really -- I would say this is kind of a next year and beyond, growth driver for us. And there's Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile and others, so there's is a number of markets there that have good reimbursement and diagnosis rates for Fabry disease, it's just a matter of going through the regulatory process, which we are now well under way.

Mike Ulz -- Baird -- Analyst

Great. Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Mohit Bansal from Citigroup. Your line is now open.

Unidentified Participant -- -- Analyst

Hi guys. This is Keith I'm from Ohio. Thanks for taking our questions and congrats on the progress this quarter. Just on the Galafold launch, looks like it's tracking really well ahead of expectations, could you characterize the 24% of global market that you're capturing just in terms of US versus rest of world? And then looking forward what are your thoughts on the balance of amenable patients? I know you mentioned conversions, but in the medium term what are your expectations in terms of capturing worldwide market share? And I just have one follow-up. Thanks.

Bradley L. Campbell -- President and Chief Operating Officer

Yeah, so for that global market share, 24% now, obviously our earlier launch countries EU 5 etc, have a higher market share today and the US is the lower market share, it's really just a matter of timing from a launch perspective. We do, however, -- you'll see in the Q break out the revenue now between international and US and over time, we think that probably peaks out at about a third of revenue, global revenue, coming from the United States where we're in a kind of mature phase but we will continue to grow to reach that distribution as the market in the US matures. And then your second question was around the switch and naive dynamics of that, right.

Unidentified Participant -- -- Analyst

Yes, that's right.

Bradley L. Campbell -- President and Chief Operating Officer

Yes, So again that's a really important marker for us and a commercial metric for us to follow and we always focused on switch patients first because they were captive in the market, they were coming in to see their physicians and rather we already getting reimbursed. But we knew, in every market we've looked in, we see the big number really equal to the treated number of diagnosed untreated patients. So there is clearly demand in the market for more treatment options and we really see Galafold is uniquely suited to meet that in similar ways that some of the oral products and have really grown that market that treated market and MPS as well.

So lots of examples of where you see in the long term the oral entrants into an injectable space really growing market. So yes, just as you alluded to, we would say -- we would see in the kind of medium term in the next few years that that percentage of switch and naive get to about 50/50. And then really in the long term, our vision is this product could really substantially grow the market to the point where the majority of patients might have been diagnosed untreated patients so yes. So it's kind of run and tackle strategy. And we'll keep following that as an important metric of our strategy and our success in the market.

Unidentified Participant -- -- Analyst

Okay that's helpful. And then just on the global compliance and adherence rate of 90%. Do you think that it's driven by disease severity and patient population or do you -- or should we expect a drop off at a later time when point of the launch gets going? And then just one more on AAV-CLN6, the 8th child who showed no evidence of disease stabilization, was there no response at all or was it just John hitting a threshold? And how was the progression compared to natural history?

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, Thanks, Brad, take the Galafold question.

Bradley L. Campbell -- President and Chief Operating Officer

Yes. So from a Galafold perspective. [Speech Overlap]

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Those are two very different questions, sorry, go ahead. Go with the first one, get them.

Unidentified Participant -- -- Analyst

Sorry about that. Just about the global compliance.

Bradley L. Campbell -- President and Chief Operating Officer

Yes, I got it. So from a global compliance and adherence, what's driving that. So first of all, now we're multiple years on in Germany, for example, from launch and we continue to sustain that 90% plus compliance and adherence and on the one hand, that's by no accident. We spend a lot of time in every market in making sure that physicians and patients understand the importance of adherence and we in -- every market has different rules around how you can support that; in some cases, we have nurses, in some cases with physician education, in some cases like in the United States, we have a case management team that helps support that process, but we have a number-- we have an app for example that help the patient to remember to take their drug, so we have a number of strategy and tactics to help actively support that.

On the other hand, you have to infer that if after so many years in the market, patients who are staying on drug is over 90%, it has to reflect some level of satisfaction and experience in the part of physicians and patients. So yeah, we'll continue to watch it, it is higher than almost any other drug, we've seen, but again it's something we actively try to support, so I would suspect that will continue going forward.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Jay, you want to take the 8th child, and the CLN6 program.

Jay A. Barth -- Chief Medical Officer

The oldest patient was treated 79 months, decline over the 24-month period a two point decline. As to say how that compares to natural history, we can't really say that at this point, because we're still in the process of collecting more natural history data that would allow us to do a batch comparison to this patient. So in terms of whether there is any effect here or not, I really can't say at this point, but it's something that we'll be able to do once we have more comprehensive natural history and able to do a batch comparison here for that all those treated patients.

Unidentified Participant -- -- Analyst

Thank you guys.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Debjit Chattopadhyay from H.C. Wainwright. Your line is now open.

Debjit Chattopadhyay -- H.C. Wainwright -- Analyst

Good morning and thank you for taking my questions. So maybe I can start off on the gene therapy side, given the collaboration with Dr. Wilson, what are your thoughts on capsid engineering with respect to liver directed gene therapy, especially centered around the dose and how those might be incorporated going forward?

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Jeff, Hung?

Hung Do -- Chief Science Officer

Sure. Thanks for the question Jeff. So we're working closely with Jim and his team on all of their AAVs that they've developed and as well as they're working on new AAVs. I would say we're always interested in looking at new either engineered or discovered AAVs. But right now as we've articulated previously, our approach is not necessarily just starting in the liver, we are looking to address liver, cardiac muscle even into the CNS to transduce cells and then to use cross correction to even further deliver the protein to all the cells and its tissues. But for other programs down the line, we certainly could be interested in other AAVs with different protozoans.

Debjit Chattopadhyay -- H.C. Wainwright -- Analyst

So, in your prepared remarks, you kind of said you won't necessarily comment on any regulatory discussions, but with your upcoming World Muscle data on AT-GAA, if that exceeds expectations, would you consider engaging the regulators especially considering a pivotal study would be pretty much enrolled by the end of the year?

Jeffrey P. Castelli -- Chief Portfolio Officer and Head of Gene Therapy

John, is that that a question Jay is going to take? Okay. Hey operator, sorry, this is Jeff and Hung in Philadelphia, I just got a text that the Amicus group in Cranbury got disconnected.

Debjit Chattopadhyay -- H.C. Wainwright -- Analyst

Appreciate that thank you so much.

Operator

Yes, I'm sorry for the delay, but they are dialing back in now. Give me one second. Your line is now open.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Hi, operator?

Operator

We are now connected.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, I don't know what happened there. Are we -- this is John Crowley -- this has never happened before, we got disconnected, so we are back on the call. Sorry about that.

Debjit Chattopadhyay -- H.C. Wainwright -- Analyst

Hey, this is Debjit, can you hear me?

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, Debjit, sorry, I don't know what happened.

Debjit Chattopadhyay -- H.C. Wainwright -- Analyst

No worries. I didn't realize I'm going to be that disruptive.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

I'm pretty sure it's Verizon not you.

Debjit Chattopadhyay -- H.C. Wainwright -- Analyst

Well, at least you can hear me now.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Well, I hear you.

Debjit Chattopadhyay -- H.C. Wainwright -- Analyst

Should I repeat my question? I am not sure if you guys got that?

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

We cut out after your question on capsid engineering then I turned it over to Jeff Castelli and Hung.

Debjit Chattopadhyay -- H.C. Wainwright -- Analyst

Okay. So my next one was I kind of pointed to your prepared comments that you wouldn't necessarily comment on any regulatory discussions, but given your upcoming WMS data on AD-GAA, that exceeded expectations and considering a study would be fully enrolled would do you consider engaging the agency on accelerating the BLA ?

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

We as you know, have Breakthrough Therapy Designation, we are constantly in a very positive dialog with the agency, the base case in any of the assumptions remains that we complete the pivotal study PROPEL and that remains the basis for full approval in US and Europe.

Debjit Chattopadhyay -- H.C. Wainwright -- Analyst

And then any read throughs from the compelling CLN6 update into CLN3 and thoughts on whether super physiologic expression could be detrimental in CLN3?

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, we think actually very positive read through for the AAV intrathecal platform that we have at Amicus particularly into CLN3, the largest of the Batten's diseases, Jay or Jeff, do you guys want to comment on why we think there's read through to CLN3 and then why also we don't think there is a concern with any over expression?

Jeffrey P. Castelli -- Chief Portfolio Officer and Head of Gene Therapy

Yes, so with CLN6 and CLN3, they are both different mutations, but both cause neurologic lysosomal dysfunction, they're both proteins that are within the cell. So we think the read through is quite significant from CLN6 to CLN3 in terms of our ability to address a certain number of neurons both in the spinal cord and the brain in CLN6 and the benefits we see there that, that should be directly transferable to CLN3.

In terms of and also all of the information we've learned across safety and manufacturing with our CLN6 is also transferable toward CLN3, we have seen no evidence in any of our studies of any concerns around over expression of the target transgene. It's been reported in a few cases in gene therapy across the whole field, but by and large, most of the concerns have been around the AAV vector safety and itself and we've seen a really good safety profile for our gene therapy to-date.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Kristen Kluska from Cantor Fitzgerald. Your line is now open.

Kristen Kluska -- Cantor Fitzgerald -- Analyst

Hi good morning everyone and thanks for taking my question. I just wanted to touch on the draft guidance that was published yesterday on Fabry disease while this is just the draft version, where there any surprises or notable items you picked up as you're removing your preclinical gene therapy asset forward? Thank you.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Sure. Thanks, Kristen, we did read that, of course. I'll let Jeff and Jay, comment on that.

Jay A. Barth -- Chief Medical Officer

I'll start. And Jeff please chime in, really no surprises there, it's very consistent with the end of the strategy that we have carry forward in our Fabry program, we see a lot of the types of approaches that we have taken. And that we plan to take in our future gene therapy program in Fabry. So nothing there that really changes the direction that we have set for our gene therapy program.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, Jeff, anything to add?

Jeffrey P. Castelli -- Chief Portfolio Officer and Head of Gene Therapy

No perfectly summarized.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, Kristen, for Fabry, we're very excited about the potential for what we are developing for gene therapy, particularly for patients with non-amenable mutations, their only option today are the enzyme replacement therapies, We think that could be a great potential opportunity to help people who were not eligible for Galafold, but again we do think for any product in development and in Fabry as we saw with Galafold given the nature of the disease and the approved therapies to date, that is certainly going to be a comprehensive approach toward approval.

Kristen Kluska -- Cantor Fitzgerald -- Analyst

Thank you so much.

Operator

Thank you. Your next question comes from the line of Salveen Richter from Goldman Sachs. Your line is now open.

Maryana Breitman -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Yes hi. Thank you for taking the question. This is Maryana Breitman for Salveen. I actually had a question on the data that was released earlier on CLN6, there it looks like there is in a few patients there is a sort of slight increase in Hamburg score that then goes down. And I was wondering whether there is some biomarker or am I right there that can explain that phenomenon or how do you guys think about it? Thank you.

Jeffrey P. Castelli -- Chief Portfolio Officer and Head of Gene Therapy

Thank you. Right now, there's search for a biomarker in CLN6 because it's membrane around protein, there's no obvious biomarker yet, but it's something that we're working on with others who are in the field. In terms of MRI data, the MRI data were collected within the study and is something that we are collecting now ourselves to analyze that, so I can't speak to that yet. But in terms of the increase that you noticed in a couple of patients, there is the possibility of an increase in score for some patients, depending on what their baseline scores were, there's also some variability in the test, given the fact that it depends on patient efforts, which maybe slightly different at a certain visit, other factors such as illnesses or recent seizures, for example.

Overall, I think the way to look at the data is over several time points, not in any one individual time point, and what we see over the seven of the eight patients, at least is very consistent measurements of their Hamburg Motor & Language Score either for the younger patients we have real stability, I mean, maintaining the same scores over time for the patients that are a bit older with somewhat lower scores, having some change in the score initially, but then stabilizing, I think it's a pattern over a longer period of time. That really is informative about the effect of the gene therapy treatments, not any one measurement. I hope that helps. And that's how we look at it.

Maryana Breitman -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Thank you

Jeffrey P. Castelli -- Chief Portfolio Officer and Head of Gene Therapy

Thanks Maryana.

Operator

Our last question will come from Yun Zhong at Janney. Your line is now open.

Yun Zhong -- Janney -- Analyst

Thank you for taking my question. And just a quick one, high level question on the gene therapy programs. Apparently, you have put together a really broad portfolio and I wonder when you consider, for example, prioritize certain programs over others, would that be completely depending on the data or you will take a strategic consideration. thinking about your product or programs outside the gene therapy portfolio. Thank you.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

I think with any of our programs, it will be based on the strength of the data and the impact, we think we could have for patients given the platforms that we're developing together with the unmet need in the patient community. I think those are the two most important factors. But we have lot of capacity internally, R&D leveraging with Dr. Wilson, is doing leveraging with our partners at Nationwide and Sanford Health are doing, to be able to put as many of these programs through preclinical development and hopefully into the clinic.

Again, we're also expanding our partnerships in manufacturing for gene therapies, as well as planning to build our own process science center of excellence and gene therapy manufacturing center of excellence and we'll have more news on that in the months ahead as well. So we're making sure we have the full infrastructure together with all the capital, including the capital we've just raised, to be able to put as many of these programs forward into the clinic. And hopefully, through the clinic as possible.

Yun Zhong -- Janney -- Analyst

Thank you.

Operator

Thank you at this time, I would now like to turn the conference back to Mr. John Crowley, Chairman and CEO for closing remarks.

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Great, operator, that's all we have today. And, obviously, an excellent quarter for Galafold for all the programs at Amicus and quite a busy fall ahead of us into the second half of this year. Thank you, everybody, have a great day.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Duration: 71 minutes

Call participants:

Sara Pellegrino -- Vice President of Investor Relations and Corporate Communications

John F. Crowley -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Bradley L. Campbell -- President and Chief Operating Officer

Daphne Queenie -- Chief Financial Officer

Anupam Rama -- JP Morgan -- Analyst

Jay A. Barth -- Chief Medical Officer

Ritu Baral -- Cowen -- Analyst

Jeffrey P. Castelli -- Chief Portfolio Officer and Head of Gene Therapy

Tazeen Ahmad -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Whitney Ijem -- Guggenheim -- Analyst

Hung Do -- Chief Science Officer

Mike Ulz -- Baird -- Analyst

Unidentified Participant -- -- Analyst

Debjit Chattopadhyay -- H.C. Wainwright -- Analyst

Kristen Kluska -- Cantor Fitzgerald -- Analyst

Maryana Breitman -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Yun Zhong -- Janney -- Analyst

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