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Toronto Dominion Bank (NYSE:TD)
Q2 2020 Earnings Call
May 28, 2020, 1:30 p.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to the TD Bank Group Q2 2020 Earnings Conference Call.

I would like to turn the meeting over to Ms. Gillian Manning, Head of Investor Relations. Please go ahead, Ms. Manning.

Gillian Manning -- Head of Investor Relations

Thank you, operator. Good afternoon and welcome to TD Bank Group's second quarter 2020 investor presentation. We will begin today's presentation with remarks from Bharat Masrani, the Bank's CEO; after which Riaz Ahmed, the Bank's CFO, will present our second quarter operating results. Ajai Bambawale, Chief Risk Officer, will then offer comments on credit quality, after which we will invite questions from pre-qualified analysts and investors on the phone. Also present today to answer your questions are Teri Currie, Group Head, Canadian Personal Banking; Greg Braca, President and CEO, TD Bank, America's Most Convenient Bank; and Bob Dorrance, Group Head, Wholesale Banking.

Please turn to Slide 2. At this time, I would like to caution our listeners that this presentation contains forward-looking statements that there are risks that actual results could differ materially from what is discussed, and that certain material factors or assumptions were applied in making these forward-looking statements. Any forward-looking statements contained in this presentation represent the views of management and are presented for the purpose of assisting the Bank's shareholders and analysts in understanding the Bank's financial position, objectives and priorities, and anticipated financial performance. Forward-looking statements may not be appropriate for other purposes.

I would also like to remind listeners that the Bank uses non-GAAP financial measures to arrive at adjusted results to assess each of its businesses and to measure overall Bank performance. The Bank believes that adjusted results provide readers with a better understanding of how management views the Bank's performance. Bharat will be referring to adjusted results in his remarks. Additional information on items of note, the Bank's reported results and factors and assumptions related to forward-looking information are all available in our Q2 2020 Report to Shareholders.

With that, let me turn the presentation over to Bharat.

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Gillian, and thank you everyone for joining us today. The last few months have been an extraordinary time for all of us. On April 2nd, we conducted our first ever virtual Annual Meeting. It's hard to believe that with June 1st just around the corner, the sweeping restrictions and economic and social activity implemented to contain the COVID-19 pandemic are still largely in place, though it is encouraging to see reopening measures beginning to take shape in some geographies.

Before I turn to our Q2 results, I want to talk about how we are meeting the COVID-19 challenge at TD. The toll exacted by this crisis and lives lost and activity disrupted will reverberate for years to come. Economies around the world have been plunged into recession and unemployment rates have risen to levels not seen in decades. But while the scale of this crisis still has the power to shock, the response it had elicited is inspiring; from dedicated front-line workers in so many different industries, including financial services, venturing out each day to keep critical services running; from businesses and non-profits fighting to maintain their operations and support their staffs; from central banks and regulators who launched new liquidity facilities to keep financial markets functioning and ease the supply of credit to the economy; and from governments, who implemented bold measures and support to tie households and businesses through this unprecedented suspension of activity. We've been proud at TD to contribute to this collective effort.

We've been working hard to support our people, so they can keep themselves safe while looking after our customers. I want to thank them for their exceptional service. This includes the many colleagues who are keeping our branches, stores and contact centers open and performing services vital to our customers, and the Bank's core operations. We've adjusted their work environments to help protect their well-being, changing schedules, reconfiguring floors in offices and investing in protective equipment and enhanced cleaning. We've recognized the sacrifice they and their families have made with additional compensation and vacation days. We quickly enabled 60,000 of our colleagues to work from home, equipping them with the tools and technology to work productively while prioritizing security.

And for all of our colleagues, we committed that there will be no job losses in 2020 as a result of COVID-19. We know this is a stressful time. This assurance is important for our colleagues as well as our customers who are depending on them for support and financial advice in this difficult times. At TD, our people are our greatest asset. Their hard work and dedication has enabled us to deliver swift and comprehensive assistance for our customers. Through our TD Health program in Canada and our TD Cares program in the US, we've connected with thousands of customers and been there to serve them in their moment of greatest need.

Across our Canadian and US retail businesses, we provided financial support to over 800,000 customers and accounts, deferring payments on approximately $62 billion in loan balances as of April 30th, extending other forms of relief, including premium reductions and deferrals, to more than 125,000 TD Insurance clients and facilitating the flow of billions of dollars in government funds to businesses through the programs like CEBA in Canada and the Paycheck Protection Program in the US. We are also helping the federal government deliver income support to Canadian households through the CERB program with 1.4 million direct deposits facilitated during the quarter.

In our Wholesale Bank, we increased total gross lending exposures by CAD23 billion, providing our corporate, institutional and government clients with critical funding and liquidity support during a period of severe market dislocation. And TD Asset Management is contributing to stabilizing capital markets having been selected by the Bank of Canada to manage its commercial paper and corporate bond purchase programs. We've also taken decisive action to support our communities. As part of the TD Ready Commitment, we've announced the TD Community Resilience Initiative, which is allocating CAD25 million to strengthen our communities and support organizations involved in the COVID-19 recovery effort.

I'm very proud of the response we mounted over the last few months. Our people have demonstrated their ability to adapt to new ways of working almost overnight. And we reshaped the Bank's operations just as quickly, supported by the investments we've made to enhance our technology infrastructure and network capacity, build new lending platforms and launch scalable end-to-end customer journeys. These investments in our infrastructure and capabilities enabled us to meet a surge in digital traffic of more than 25% across our banking and insurance businesses, managed record trading volumes in our direct investing business and stay connected to customers across our footprint. From virtual trading desk to video communications to new online and mobile tools delivering payment relief and advice to our more than 14 million active digital customers, TD has remained strong, active and fully operational from the first day of this crisis. And we are well positioned to continue supporting our customers and colleagues on the road to recovery.

These purposeful investments have been made possible by the strength of our model, a diversified business mix backed by North American scale, underpinned by a strong risk culture. It has demonstrated its resilience over time and through a variety of challenging operating environments and is proving its mettle again now. This quarter, we earned through tremendous headwinds, earnings were CAD1.6 billion and EPS was CAD0.85 as we absorbed a substantial increase in provisions for performing loans as well as margin pressure from the steep drop in interest rates. Our CET1 capital ratio was 11%, down 70 basis points from the prior quarter on higher RWA, reflecting both the deterioration in the economic environment and the balance sheet growth as we continue to support our clients.

A tough quarter, no question, but one that demonstrates the resilience of our model and our strategy. Everything you know about TD has been borne out by this crisis. We build long-term relationships with customers and stand by them in good times and bad. Risk appetite is our compass. We have the ability to execute with speed and purpose when the world shifts around us, and the earnings power and balance sheet strength to play a role in the recovery. That recovery will come, though it is not clear how long it will take.

The revenue picture is likely to remain challenging, given the lower for longer interest rate environment. And provisions for credit losses may remain elevated if the downturn is more prolonged. But the hallmark of TD is our ability to adapt to any operating environment and seize the opportunities it presents. Today, we are firmly focused on the way forward, examining our workplaces and making plans to reopen locations with the focus on continuing to provide safe spaces for our customers and colleagues as we begin the hard work of rebuilding.

Banking is a critical service, an engine of economic growth and a pillar of the financial system. For 165 years, TD has been privileged to play this role. Given the power of our model, the strength of our balance sheet and our distinctive culture, I'm confident that we will emerge from this crisis stronger and better positioned to continue serving our customers, colleagues and communities.

I'll wrap up with two thoughts. First, I'm very proud of how we responded to this challenge as an industry. We are fierce competitors, but with a strong tradition of mutual respect for each other as well as our counterparts in government and the supervisory agencies. Drawing on our long experience and our collective expertise, we've been working to deliver the right outcomes for our customers and clients as well as the economy and society.

I also want to thank our 90,000 people, who've been bringing their best selves to work each day under very trying circumstances to embody our purpose to enrich the lives of our customers, colleagues and communities and give meaning to our vision to be The Better Bank.

With that, I'll turn it over to Riaz.

Riaz Ahmed -- Group Head and Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Bharat. Good afternoon, everyone. Please turn to Slide 9. This quarter, the Bank reported earnings of CAD1.5 billion and EPS of CAD0.80. Adjusted earnings were CAD1.6 billion and adjusted EPS was CAD0.85. Revenue increased 3%, reflecting volume growth across our businesses and record wholesale revenues, partially offset by margin compression and lower fee income as a result of reduced customer activity in the banking businesses. Provisions for credit losses increased to CAD3.2 billion, largely reflecting higher performing PCL. Expenses decreased 2% year-over-year notwithstanding approximately CAD75 million in direct costs incurred this quarter related to COVID-19. The decline in expenses primarily reflects higher PCL for the US strategic cards portfolio, which is offset in corporate non-interest expenses. As you know the partner share of the revenue and PCL for the US strategic card portfolio program is held in the corporate segment, with an offsetting entry representing the partner share of the net profits recorded in corporate non-interest expenses, resulting in no impact on corporate or total bank net income. Higher PCL this quarter, including for the retail program partners resulted in a smaller net profit share and therefore a lower charge to expenses. We have included an illustrative example on Slide 27 to help clarify the gross and net accounting requirements for this portfolio.

Please turn to Slide 10. Canadian retail net income was $1.2 billion, down 37% year-over-year, reflecting higher PCL and expenses, partially offset by revenue growth. On an adjusted basis, net income decreased 36%. Revenue was up 1%, reflecting volume growth in deposits and loans, and higher insurance premiums and wealth fees partially offset by margin compression. Average loans rose 5% and deposits rose 10% year-over-year, reflecting growth in both personal and business volumes. Wealth assets were down 2%, reflecting declining in market values. On a spot basis, loans and deposits for Canadian P&C were up 4% and 13%, respectively as at quarter end. Margin was 2.83%, a decrease of 11 basis points from the prior quarter, reflecting lower interest rates and competitive pricing and term deposits. Total PCL increased by $762 million quarter-over-quarter, primarily reflecting higher performing PCL. Total PCL as an annualized percentage of credit volumes was 107 basis points, up 71 basis points quarter-over-quarter. Expenses increased 4%, reflecting higher spend supporting business growth including investment in front line staff and changes in pension costs and volume driven expenses. Adjusted expenses were up 5%.

Please turn to Slide 11. US retail net income was $261 million, US Retail Bank net income was $87 million, down $666 million, reflecting higher PCL, lower revenue and higher expenses. Average loan volumes increased 7% year-over-year, reflecting growth in the personal and business customer segments. Deposit volumes, excluding the TD Ameritrade sweep deposits were up 10% including 8% growth in the core consumer checking accounts. TD Ameritrade sweep deposits were up 24%. On a spot basis, loans were up 12% and deposits excluding TD Ameritrade were up 19% as at quarter end. Spot TD Ameritrade deposits were up 37%.

Net interest margin was 2.93%, down 14 basis points sequentially, primarily reflecting lower deposit margins. Total PCL including only the Bank's contractual portion of credit losses in the strategic card portfolio was $814 million, up $571 million from the prior quarter. The US retail net PCL ratio was 2.03%, up 144 basis points from last quarter. Expenses increased 6% year-over-year, reflecting increases in legal provisions, partially offset by productivity savings. We had $82 million tax recovery this quarter, primarily reflecting lower pre-tax income, partially offset by higher provisions related to changes in tax law. The contribution from TD's Investment in TD Ameritrade decreased to $174 million, primarily reflecting reduced trading commissions and higher operating expenses, partially offset by increased trading volumes.

Please turn to Slide 12. Net income for wholesale banking was CAD209 million, a decrease of CAD12 million reflecting higher PCL, partially offset by higher revenue. Revenue was nearly CAD1.3 billion, reflecting higher trading-related revenue from interest rate and foreign exchange trading and higher debt underwriting fees partially offset by losses in equity trading in very volatile markets. PCL was CAD374 million, an increase of CAD357 million from the prior quarter. PCL impaired was CAD194 million, reflecting credit migration, largely in the oil and gas sector. PCL performing was CAD180 million primarily related to a significant deterioration in the economic outlook including its impact to credit migration. Expenses are CAD616 million, up 3% reflecting higher volume related expenses.

Please turn to Slide 13. Corporate segment reported a net loss of CAD202 million in the quarter compared to a net loss of CAD161 million in the second quarter last year. Reported net loss increased, primarily reflecting a lower contribution from treasury items and higher net corporate expenses, partially offset by lower amortization of intangibles. Adjusted net loss was CAD143 million compared with an adjusted net loss of CAD95 million in the second quarter last year.

Please turn to Slide 14. Our common equity Tier 1 ratio ended the quarter at 11%, down 69 basis points from Q1. Organic capital generation added 20 basis points to capital this quarter, including 19 basis points from a reduction in our expected loss shortfall. As you know when loss is calculated for regulatory capital purposes exceed accounting provisions, this excess is deducted from capital. With this quarter's increase in allowances, the gap has narrowed and we recoup some of the capital previously deducted. We also saw an 11 basis points benefit from us this transitional arrangements for expected credit-loss provision. We also saw losses on fair value through OCI Securities and we completed the repurchase of 7.8 million common shares in mid-March. The 80 basis points decline in CET1 attributable to risk weight growth was primarily a function of higher credit risk, risk-weighted assets, reflecting volume growth in our commercial and wholesale banking businesses as we supported our customers with new and increased credit facilities, a decline in asset quality reflecting negative credit migration in this challenging environment, which Ajay will discuss shortly.

And as you know, we have been migrating our US bank assets from standardize to AIRB, and this particular quarter we transitioned a credit card portfolio, which cost us 9 basis points. While this particular transition was negative, we expect that the, sorry -- while this particular portfolio transition was negative the migration to AIRB has generally been positive to the capital calculation and we expect it to continue to be positive with ongoing migration through the second half of this year. We saw market risk, risk-weighted assets increased by CAD5 million in our wholesale business, reflecting the volatility in interest rates and credit spreads this quarter. Leverage ratio was 4.2% and our LCR ratio was 135%, both well above regulatory minimums. Effective this quarter, we have reduced the rate of CET1 capital allocated to our business segments from 10.5% to 9%. In addition, for prudence. We have also introduced a 2% discount on our dividend reinvestment plan for the dividend declared today.

With that I will turn the call over to Ajai?

Ajai Bambawale -- Group Head and Chief Risk Officer

Thank you Riaz, and good afternoon everyone. Please turn to Slide 15. Gross impaired loan formations were CAD1.78 billion, stable quarter-over-quarter at 24 basis points.

Please turn to Slide 16. Gross impaired loans ended the quarter at CAD3.6 billion or 47 basis points, up 2 basis points quarter-over-quarter and down 1 basis point year-over-year. The quarter-over-quarter increase in gross impaired loans was driven by the Canadian retail segment in both the consumer and commercial lending portfolios. The Wholesale segment largely reflected in the oil and gas sector and the impact of foreign exchange.

Please turn to Slide 17. Recall that our presentation reports PCL ratios, both gross and net of the partner share of the US strategic card credit losses. We remind you that credit losses recorded in the Corporate segment are fully absorbed by our partners and do not impact the Bank's net income. The Bank's PCL in the quarter were CAD3.2 billion or 176 basis points. PCLs were up across all segments and all major asset classes and were primarily related to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Please turn to Slide 18. The Bank's impaired PCL increased CAD160 million quarter-over-quarter, mainly due to credit migration in the Wholesale segment, largely in the oil and gas sector. Performing PCL increased by CAD2.1 billion quarter-over-quarter, and I will address this momentarily.

Please turn to Slide 19. I would now like to take a few minutes to discuss the impact of COVID-19 on our allowance for credit losses. The allowance for credit losses increased by CAD2.6 billion this quarter, raising the Bank's total allowance coverage of gross loans and acceptances from 74 basis points to 103 basis points. This increase is primarily due to higher performing allowances, including the impact of credit migration, reflecting a significant deterioration in the economic outlook related to the COVID-19 pandemic, partially offset by the mitigating impact of a variety of deferral and government assistance programs available to our clients.

The change in the economic outlook incorporates a material increase in unemployment, substantial near-term GDP contraction and assumes a gradual recovery where economic activity does not return to pre-crisis levels for an extended period. The allowance increase was across the Canadian and US geographies, and by asset class due to a CAD1 billion increase for our business and government portfolios reflected across multiple industries, including oil and gas, and CAD1.6 billion increase across the consumer lending portfolios, primarily for the auto, other personal and credit card portfolios. CAD438 million of the increase in the credit cards portfolios is attributable to the US strategic card partnership. I'm satisfied with the Bank's current allowance coverage, considering the provisions added this quarter and our portfolio and geographic mix. The potential for further provisions will largely depend on the magnitude and duration of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Please turn to Slide 20. Given the expectation of sustained lower oil and gas prices, I will now take a moment to discuss the Bank's exposure to this sector. The Bank's pipeline oil and gas loans amount to CAD12. 2 billion and are nearly evenly split across the Canadian and US geographies, and 28% are investment-grade. Our concentration to the oil and gas producer and servicer segments, which are generally most exposed to low energy prices, is relatively small, continuing to represent less than 1% of the Bank's gross loans and acceptances. Furthermore, in response to lower commodity prices, oil and gas producers have taken a number of risk-mitigating measures such as reduce capex, temporary production curtailments and other liquidity-bolstering activities.

Excluding real estate secured lending, consumer lending and small business banking exposures to Alberta, Saskatchewan and Newfoundland and Labrador represent 2% of total gross loans and acceptances, and have remained stable at that level in recent years. Consumer delinquency and impairment levels in these provinces are elevated, and we expect they may be more impacted moving forward, given the combined impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and lower oil and gas prices. And we have incorporated this in our allowance for credit losses this quarter.

Overall, oil and gas exposures represent a small portion of the Bank's lending portfolios. We will continue to regularly perform detailed assessments of our oil and gas exposure as the challenges facing this sector play out, and further losses are expected to remain manageable.

Now, moving back to total Bank results, let me briefly summarize. We are operating through challenging conditions, given the unprecedented impact from the COVID-19 pandemic. And while the duration of the pandemic and severity of the economic impact remains uncertain, we are well-prepared to manage through these difficult times.

With that, operator, we're now ready to begin the Q&A session.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

Thank you. [Operator Instructions] And your first question is from John Aiken from Barclays. Please go ahead.

John Aiken -- Barclays -- Analyst

Good afternoon. Riaz, a bit of a detail question for you if you wouldn't mind. On the balance sheet, we saw a significant increase in the -- on interest-bearing deposits with banks. Is this a transitory impact that happened right at quarter-end or is this going to be a sustained balance that's going to be fairly high? And if that's the case, can you give us some sense as to what that would mean to overall net interest margins?

Riaz Ahmed -- Group Head and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. John, thank you. As you know, throughout the period of the pandemic and, as you mentioned, closer to quarter-end, the level of deposits that have been accumulated rose quite significantly, which obviously as a starting point goes into cash balances and then we're able to invest some of it in shorter or longer-term securities. So you're quite right in pointing out that it may well be temporary as clients and customers who have access to customer relief programs as well as government relief programs and that have accumulated some cash in their accounts may see that as they utilize that cash to meet their needs and their obligations. We may see some of that come back. How much of it that we're able to extend into longer-term yield bearing investments will just depend on the customer behavior that we're able to observe in the utilization of that cash.

I'd say, one other significant contributor to those cash balances was, as I mentioned earlier, the rise in deposits coming out of -- sweep deposits coming out of TD Ameritrade as the number of clients took money out of the market and were holding cash for some period of time. So, I think that the impact on aggregate margins would be really not forecastable in the short trend here until we see a little bit of stability returning to how our clients are managing their finances.

John Aiken -- Barclays -- Analyst

I guess, you're putting the ball back in my court. Thanks, Riaz. I'll requeue.

Operator

Thank you. The next question is from Gabriel Dechaine from National Bank Financial. Please go ahead.

Gabriel Dechaine -- National Bank Financial -- Analyst

Hi. Good afternoon. First question on earnings. I mean, we're hearing that this quarter earnings don't matter, but eventually people will hear about earnings of pay the dividend and contribute to your capital generation. I wanted to kind of talk in the earnings outlook to your stress scenario, the internal stress test. I'm sure you've done it like other banks, and in whatever scenario, your core Tier 1 doesn't fall below X, whatever that is. One of the components of that type of projection would be earnings. I'm just wondering what kind of earnings level their generation or growth do you have in those types of scenarios?

Ajai Bambawale -- Group Head and Chief Risk Officer

Gabriel, as you would expect. So first of all I'd answer by saying that earnings always matter. I think you can see that this quarter they don't, but that's not how we see it. Earnings always matter and what's important though is, you should know that we run a variety of stress tests using different scenarios that are applicable. And clearly this particular pandemic has been probably come about more rapidly with duration and severity that I think we can all easily agree is unprecedented. But look, I think we continue to stress test our liquidity and capital positions and you can always come up with very severe adverse scenarios in which earnings may be pressured even more. But on the other hand as the reopenings become a bit more -- start kicking hold more -- with more confidence then we should also start seeing the Bank's results react to that. So clearly, it is a function of the unprecedented economic environment we are in.

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Gabe, this is Bharat, so I'll add to that, I mean these are unprecedented times. The reason earnings are depressed is because of the allowance -- the level of allowances the bank has taken, and that is based on our current view of what the future looks like. And it's hard to predict it perfectly, but we will be checking in very, very regularly to see how that plays out. The other thing I would add is that one of the hallmarks of TD, one of the strengths of TD is that we will adapt to the environment we find ourselves in, and I know we will and I know we will thrive in whatever operating environment turns out to be the reality. So, so yes in earnings as we have said matter even this quarter's earnings matter, but I expect the bank to adapt to the environment we find ourselves in over the next little while.

Gabriel Dechaine -- National Bank Financial -- Analyst

I guess what I'm after though is, you know as Ajai said, you've got an extended period for when you expect economic activity to return to normal levels. What does that -- what are your -- what are your earnings projections like in that sort of scenario? Is it back to 2019 sort of profitability by 2022, '23 or something other than that?

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

It's hard to give out a specific year Gabriel. Interest rates are -- you tell me when interest rates will start to move, you tell me will the economy opens up completely. So it's hard to pin down a particular factor here, I mean we are in unprecedented times, but as I've said, notwithstanding the time that we are going through, TD's business mix, given our scale, North American scale, what we've been able to do, how we manage through this crisis to date and how I expect us to adapt going forward. I see the bank strength and the like I said in my remarks, I expect us to be coming out of this stronger than we entered it.

Gabriel Dechaine -- National Bank Financial -- Analyst

Okay. My other question, I'll make it quick, on credit some banks have talked about the Q3, Q4, expect performing provisions to decline from this quarters level, performing being the operative word, what about impaired provision, they're going to be picking up, is it going to, you'll have movements out of stage II into stage III, are they going to offset each other or could the pickup in stage III provisions keep these, what we're seeing today at that level for a number of quarters?

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, Todd, [Indecipherable] let me take that. It's a good question. So, as you know, we built a material amount of allowances this quarter and most of it is performing. So in future quarters we do expect to see high level of impairments. I think the fact that we built these performing allowances is going to help, but it could be some incremental allowance if a particular account goes from performing to impaired, but the fact that we built a material amount this quarter I think is going to help in future quarters.

Gabriel Dechaine -- National Bank Financial -- Analyst

Maybe I'll follow up on that one.

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Gabriel.

Operator

Thank you. Your next question is from Ebrahim Poonawala of Bank of America. Please go ahead.

Ebrahim Poonawala -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Hi. If I could first just very quickly follow-up on your answer regarding the impaired PCLs. If you can just help -- or help us walk through this, is it fair to assume that the reserve levels are unlikely to decline anytime soon. So you're going to maintain that reserves loss as things migrate and you see credit migration, you're going to lose some PCL tied to those loans. As we move forward, resulting in a period of elevated PCLs is that the right thought process? Even if the macro backdrop, your assumptions around unemployment don't change, we should see elevated PCLs just by the migration of the loan book?

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

It's a very good question and let me take a few minutes to answer that. So as you know we have built material amount of PCL this quarter. There is however tremendous amount of uncertainty with respect to duration and the severity of this crisis, the shape of the recovery. What I would say is, if the outlook remains unchanged, then yes, this would be the high watermark for us. However, there is one caveat because it has changed from performing to impaired then you could see some increase because of impaired. However, if the outlook improves, you could even see a reduction or a release, and if the outlook worsens there could be an add. So I think you got to keep in mind that the whole environment we're dealing this year is very uncertain, but the key message is like we have built a substantial amount of PCL this quarter that's based on our forward-looking view. So that will change only if our forward-looking view changes.

Ebrahim Poonawala -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Got it. So that sounds a lot more like your PCLs reflect your life of loss expectations for this book?

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, that's the IFRS 9 principles. So, we are following our accounting standards.

Ebrahim Poonawala -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Got it. And I guess just separately Riaz, in terms of capital, so if we can just talk about in terms of your capital outlook, what balance sheet growth might do as we move forward? And you mentioned the continued transition to AIRB should be positive. If you could address those two and give us a sense of where CET1 goes from here?

Riaz Ahmed -- Group Head and Chief Financial Officer

Ebrahim, as you know, we entered into this crisis carrying tremendous balance sheet and strengthened capital and liquidity. And this is a hallmark of TD that you're well familiar with that we do carry plenty of capital and liquidity. Sometimes we have remarked in a focused way that we make, we want to be able to make loans during bad times as well. And so as you can see it from the growth in our balance sheet, we are clearly doing that we're standing by our clients when they need us and we intend to continue to do so. And as the economy reopens and demand materializes for additional credit, we will be extending that credit within the risk appetite of TD that you are well familiar with. So I think carrying strong amounts of capital in this environment to take advantage of opportunities is a prudent thing to do.

Ebrahim Poonawala -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Got it. So should we expect -- should we not be surprised if the capital ratio is into the balance over the next quarter or two as you extend credit. Are there some RWA inflation to credit, is that reasonable assumption going forward?

Riaz Ahmed -- Group Head and Chief Financial Officer

Well in ordinary course times. You know that we continue to generate capital and then reinvest it in the business to create growth. As Ajai just indicated, we are in a period of uncertainty. And if the economy recover as well we will be continuing to extend credit to our clients and if it turns out that things go the other way, then we may well see additional allowances and more migration. So we are really not into a period right now that is forecastable with any degree of -- high degree of confidence.

Ebrahim Poonawala -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Well, thank you.

Operator

Thank you. The next question is from Steve Theriault from Eight Capital. Please go ahead.

Steve Theriault -- Eight Capital -- Analyst

Thanks very much. First, I just wanted to circle with Riaz, Riaz you talked about some positives on AIRB migration in the second half of the year for the US banks. Can you just give a bit of detail around what portfolios and the level of materiality there?

Riaz Ahmed -- Group Head and Chief Financial Officer

Well, the one that -- the biggest portfolio that remains to be migrated is our US non-retail portfolio and you know that it is a large and a material portfolio, which we are working hard to complete the work to have it implemented, hopefully by the end of this year.

Steve Theriault -- Eight Capital -- Analyst

And do you have a ballpark of materiality to it or is it too soon?

Riaz Ahmed -- Group Head and Chief Financial Officer

That's something that I'm not really prepared to disclose right now, Steve. As you know, with the number of moving parts between shortfall calculations and the implementation of it, we'll be -- we'll need to be quite careful, and I'd be low to really quantify that for you right now.

Steve Theriault -- Eight Capital -- Analyst

Okay. And then -- thanks for that. And Bharat, you mentioned in your opening remarks coming out better positioned, this pandemic could open up some opportunities to expand inorganically in the US. Mostly, TD has been on pause the last few years in terms of deal flow in the United States. Do you think -- what are your thoughts on the early innings? Do you think this has the potential to turn into a meaningful opportunity to scale up or fill in your footprint?

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Well, just firstly, let me add to your first question to Riaz.

Steve Theriault -- Eight Capital -- Analyst

Sure.

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

If you look at our history at TD, strong capital levels and the need to maintain strong capital levels is just part of our character. That's what we do. We think it's important to manage capital very closely, and that's what you would expect out of TD. So, as Riaz is cautious in telling you what he did, and rightly so given the environment, but I can tell you that you should expect TD to have a cautious view and a prudent view on how we manage capital.

Regarding your second question, we are through the cycle type of lenders. We have a particular risk discipline in the Bank. I'm very proud of how the Bank performs in different environments. The business mix we have is something that we work hard to have, and we are on a great scale in both sides of the border. And the good news here is that TD is not required to do an M&A type of transaction because we have strategically challenged we are not.

But having said that, the environment we are in is an interesting one. It is unprecedented, and I am sure given the type of situation we are facing that there may be opportunities out there. And if there are, then of course you would expect us to look at them seriously. But we will only do that if -- to have -- we would have to make sure that we have a better understanding of what this environment may turn out, how bad it might get. We have no interest in inheriting anybody else's problems. And we'll have to look at whether it makes strategic sense, makes financial sense and timing sense. So, if all those things turn out to be well-aligned, and of course we'll look at it seriously.

Steve Theriault -- Eight Capital -- Analyst

Okay. Thanks for that, Bharat.

Operator

Thank you. Your next question is from Meny Grauman from Cormark Securities. Please go ahead.

Meny Grauman -- Cormark Securities -- Analyst

Hi. Good afternoon. A question on your card business. So, with your card business in Canada focus on travel rewards and then in the US the exposure to a few big retailers, is there a need to rethink the Bank's card strategy right now?

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

So this is Bharat again. Why don't I pass on, firstly, the Canadian part to Teri Currie? Teri?

Teri Currie -- Group Head, Canadian Personal Banking

Absolutely. Thank you. So, I would say, we're very comfortable with the line up of credit cards that we have available to Canadians. We like to say we have a card for every -- to meet every Canadian's needs, and obviously those are the travel cards, as you cited, but also cash-back cards across a variety of categories.

Clearly, in this quarter, given the circumstance, we probably had expected CAD5 billion or more in spend that didn't materialize. But we still feel, if you look forward, that we're well positioned across categories and looking forward to the Air Canada partnership and loyalty program launching upcoming later this calendar year.

Meny Grauman -- Cormark Securities -- Analyst

Thanks, Teri. And Greg, did you want to pick up the US side of it?

Greg Braca -- Group Head, US Retail

Sure. So, thanks for the question. I'd just add that as we've been talking about for the last several years, we spent a lot of time and energy building our card platforms in the US from scratch. And it includes not only the partnership programs that you talk about with the large retailers, and certainly if one comes up that makes sense and it's the right partner and we understand the dynamics and the economics make sense, we're interested in expanding those. But also, our de novo bank card business, our own branded bank card for our own customers, we spent time building that. And obviously we look to continue to leverage that with our own customer base going forward.

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Greg. And Meny, just to add -- this is Bharat again -- I think we've talked about this in previous calls. I think about a year ago, two years ago, Teri talked about the investment we've made or we were making at the time to expand our card offerings in Canada with the cash-back card and the entry-level card and all that, and the timing turned out to be excellent for that in order to diversify our card portfolio. And as you know, our approach for unsecured lending is to go with the prime side of the FICO scores and all that. So, I wanted to add.

And in the US, I know this has been -- lots of questions around why is TD more interested in partnership deals. Greg did say that it provide us a foundation to build our card portfolio, but I think now the pandemic is showing that those partnership deals have turned out to be terrific because the lion's share of these losses, if they happen to materialize, will be for the account of the partner. So these things work out in different ways in different circumstances. But given where we are, we are very happy that a big portion of our US portfolio is in our partnership deals.

Meny Grauman -- Cormark Securities -- Analyst

Thanks for that. And just a follow-up on the partnership with Air Canada. Do you have the ability to change any terms of that agreement? And I guess, more importantly, do you foresee having any of those kinds of discussions?

Teri Currie -- Group Head, Canadian Personal Banking

I have to think that [Phonetic].

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Sorry. Go ahead, Teri. Teri, go ahead. Sorry.

Teri Currie -- Group Head, Canadian Personal Banking

Sorry about that, Bharat. As you would expect, we would have a contract with Air Canada that we would honor, and we're excited over the long-term about the prospect of this partnership.

Meny Grauman -- Cormark Securities -- Analyst

Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. The next question is from Sumit Malhotra from Scotiabank. Please go ahead.

Sumit Malhotra -- Scotiabank -- Analyst

Thanks. Good afternoon. I'll start with Riaz on the capital slide, please. So, you show us here that the market risk component of the portfolio had an 11-basis-point impact on CET1, and we can see in some of your capital disclosure that VAR was up quite significantly this quarter, and that's reflected in the movement in risk levels. The offset that you have in methodology, was this the implementation of the stress bar or -- sorry, relaxation of the stress bar relief or was there other components at play? And I ask because most of your competitors actually had market RWA decline this quarter, and obviously the impact is different for you. I'm just wondering if this is something specific to this quarter that may reverse going forward.

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

No. I think you got it right that with the promotion of the data, which includes a volatile period, you see the rise in the risk weights. And then that line item you're referring to includes the relief and the modification that came from OSFI during this period of time.

Sumit Malhotra -- Scotiabank -- Analyst

And with the relief in place and the data updated, so is this for lack of a better term, a run rate level for the Bank now or as market conditions have eased, how quickly does that get reflected and how the risk -- the movement in risk levels has captured here?

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

No, I think as you see markets starting to stabilize and the volatility coming in and spreads coming in, we would expect to see market risk numbers start migrating back down.

Riaz Ahmed -- Group Head and Chief Financial Officer

Just to add to that, you do have the stress data as part of your dataset. So, I think the VAR and SVAR will come down and that helps, but it's going to remain elevated from what it used to be before.

Sumit Malhotra -- Scotiabank -- Analyst

Right.

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Until the 200-and-odd days pass.

Riaz Ahmed -- Group Head and Chief Financial Officer

259, yeah [Phonetic].

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah.

Sumit Malhotra -- Scotiabank -- Analyst

All right. So, this movement this quarter, as far as credits -- or credit is concerned, I think we all know that there was a heavy level of drawdown activity. And Bharat, maybe I'll put this one to you. I am a bit surprised with the Bank sitting at 11% and perhaps at least on the draws' perspective, there should be some relief on that going forward. Putting the discounting on the drip here, at least the way I look at it effectively equates the 25 million shares going out the door over the next year if it remains in place. Were you concerned that without this capital uptick that the Bank may move below some of the thresholds that regulators look at or the market looks at in terms of capital adequacy? Why did you think this was the time to put this in place?

Ajai Bambawale -- Group Head and Chief Risk Officer

So, Sumit, best way to describe this is, as Riaz use the term that and then traditionally, this is what the bank has been, you've known us for many years, that prudent capital management is the right phrase at TD. I mean these are unprecedented times and you do want to just make sure that you're doing the prudent thing here. And if it turns out that know our expectation of where, where this economy might be. And this is -- might be a short-term issue, then we can always switch it off. And the other question, somebody had asked me who knows, there might be other opportunities available in the market. We might want to take advantage of that given our scale, given our ability to integrate and convert acquisition. So we're looking at it and it's not only by the way on an M&A front, but traditionally TD through any downturn has also been able to take market share. And at least my urging to our business leaders is that we should not lose that muscle as we go through this -- this particular event because it will throw up opportunities in the marketplace to organically grow our franchise as well. So to have all that flexibility, I think it's important to have very prudent capital management in place.

Sumit Malhotra -- Scotiabank -- Analyst

And I'll finish with one for Teri, if it's OK. As this week is going on, I think most of us are ready for the uptick in provisions, we are ready for the pressure on NIM. I think one that probably at least from my seat should have been more prepared for is just the pressure we're seeing on some of the fee income lines that we normally take for granted in Europe -- in the P&C segment. So for both you and Greg, obviously weighing on the revenue lines. We've talked a lot about some of the changes that might happen in terms of real estate and how employees work when the Bank considers some of the waivers that have been put in place, whether it's service charges, in some cases creditor insurance, we're obviously seeing weaker card revenues. Do you feel there are aspects in either of your businesses from these reductions that could have a longer lasting impact on how customers expect their banks to behave, when it comes to the fee income lines within P&C?

Teri Currie -- Group Head, Canadian Personal Banking

There is a lot in that question. Let me start with just the other income growth and then move to perhaps business changes. So pre the pandemic, we would have seen kind of low to mid single digit range growth in other income. So again it's been said earlier in the call, it's very uncertain the size and shape of what happens going forward. And so we're going to be very careful as we think through any decisions we might make about the business moving forward. Clearly the big impacts have been the spend that didn't materialize in the cards business as I mentioned and then FX revenue for both cards and everyday banking. We would have seen airlines spend in the quarter down over 90% as an example, but daily essentials held up well and that sort of speaks to that cash back card offering and the breadth of our line up. If you sort of taking the -- if this became sustained I think is the question you're asking, then how do we think about our business moving forward? I feel like we came into this situation incredibly well positioned with strong market share positions across many of our businesses. You also saw the benefit of the diversification in the Canadian retail business, with the strong wealth and insurance performance. Clearly right now our focus is on safely enabling business to be done and continuing to carefully manage our distribution back, but we had been through our future ready strategy working toward the sort of inevitability of more migration of simple transactions to digital and that need for customers on the more complex pieces of their financial life to be able to meet with advisors and to get advice in an omnichannel way. And you can see that the investments we've made in our business in omnichannel has paid off, with industry leading digital results. You've seen our digital adoption and engagement continue to grow, almost 8 million active digital users 72% of whom are mobile active and digital adoption up 323 basis points this quarter.

So I would say it's possible as we work forward and we consider the flexibility that work from home has allowed in particular for our contact center and the opportunity that that might give us in terms of talent joining the bank in a full time way across branch and phone channel was an example versus part time in one part of the business. The ability for our folks to be redeployed. We've been temporarily redeploying them to collections work, to help us work, to customer cares work, or to fraud work and so the ability for our people to work more seamlessly and our customers to engage with us more conveniently as we made more automation available or things that I think will have lasting impact to the business, but as we think about how many branches we would have, what we will do in those four walls, will be very carefully guided by how customer behavior evolves over time. And I would just say, this has been said by many of my colleagues, but what we found is just the power of the culture and the power of our people working at TD, they have been dedicated and innovative and compassionate and supportive, many of them still face to face with clients and very actively busy in our open branches.

Greg Braca -- Group Head, US Retail

So unless -- I think Teri answered, it's Greg, I think Teri answered that perfectly even from the south side of the border and anything you want specifically on the US, I'm happy to go into, but I would just leave you with, at least on the other income side to the story, we're going to be guided in the short run by did the markets open back up as the economy led back up again and we certainly saw for the last half of Q2, a dramatic decrease in the US in terms of activity and volumes and obviously we're seeing states begin to reopen real time and we're going to watch this very, very closely, but happy to pick up anything specifically in the US, you want to cover.

Sumit Malhotra -- Scotiabank -- Analyst

I think Teri gave me a lot. My interest was really fee income, but we got some infill in the future of how you plan to interact with your customers as well. So I think I'll take the two for one and I'll leave it there. Thank you very much.

Gillian Manning -- Head of Investor Relations

It's Gillian. We have about six questions left. And so if I could just ask everybody to stick to one question, please. So we don't keep you for too much of the rest of the afternoon.

Operator

Thank you. The next question is from Mario Mendonca from TD Securities. Please go ahead.

Mario Mendonca -- TD Securities -- Analyst

Yes, and this probably for Riaz and Ajai. As this earning season has played out, coming to understand what I didn't understand at the very beginning a bit. So what would be helpful for me is to if you could take me through, how you contemplated risk migration essentially the movement of TD and expected loss of [Indecipherable] all that's -- how did that come into the calculation of your performing loan loss? Specifically, was it just a management overlay or did you the supply the model for resell, but then look at the individual corporate loans. How did you actually go about that with migration perspective?

Riaz Ahmed -- Group Head and Chief Financial Officer

Thanks for the questions. So let me describe the process. I would start by saying is we put substantial effort into allowance process because we are in an unprecedented circumstance. We started by selecting our scenarios and of course we give different scenarios awaiting and then we have run them through our models, but I would say that's the starting -- that was the starting point for us. Thereafter we actually added an overlay. And the overlay basically considered a few things, the first is we did a number of portfolio assessments across the bank. Some of them were borrower level assessments as well. So that kind of inform was overlay reported. Second is, we looked at macro changes since the time we selected our scenario. So, we added an overlay for that. Third is we had to reflect the benefits of the TD relief programs, we had to also reflect the benefit of all the government programs. So we considered all of that and then added an overlay to the modeled results, but just on PD specifically it's, it's basically the macro that drove the PD changes in the case of retail, I'd say in the case of non-retail it is a combination of the macros, plus the various bottom up and portfolio reviews that we did. I hope that helps.

Mario Mendonca -- TD Securities -- Analyst

Yeah. So you're not suggesting you looked at every single commercial loan and corporate loan. I don't think that's impossible. So are you saying you did more of like a sampling of it and implied something from the sample?

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

We looked at it on a pretty broad basis and we've been looking at it over an extended period of time. So it was pretty deep early.

Mario Mendonca -- TD Securities -- Analyst

Yeah. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. The next question is from Sohrab Movahedi from BMO Capital Markets. Please go ahead.

Sohrab Movahedi -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

Mine is a pretty quick one. When I look at the oil and gas disclosure, to me it was surprising the proportion that was non-investment grade. Would this have been broadly speaking reflection of the credit quality at origination as well or is this after you've taken downgrades that have taken them into non-investment-grade territory?

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Maybe, first I'll ask Bob to comment and then perhaps you can comment on the migration part of it, Ajai. Bob, do you want to comment on strategically on what...

Bob Dorrance -- Group Head, Wholesale Banking

A little of combination of both, Sohrab, the non-investment grade portfolio is primarily the producer portfolio on both sides of the border, both in Canada and the US. And that's the reserve-based lending book that we have. And in Canada, as a result of the 2016 little shock, that book has been slowly working its way through. We've been in difficult times in Alberta for a period of time, whereas in the US, it's -- the reserve-based lending has been more challenged but just more recently. So, that has a little less history, perhaps being a bit more conservative. And then, we did have some migration as well from investment-grade into non-investment-grade.

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Ajai, you want to pick it up?

Ajai Bambawale -- Group Head and Chief Risk Officer

Yeah. Just to add so. If you recollect back in '16, we ran a number of stress tests in the sector. And so, we actually repeated that exercise for the quarter, and we looked at WTI from CAD20 to CAD30 gradually increasing. We made assumptions around the heavy oil differential. We certainly made some assumptions around natural gas starting with CAD1.25 to CAD1.75 range, gradually building up. So we've used that information to determine what kind of downgrade actions were appropriate. But the reason why you've seen such little investment-grade in producer is that we have proactively gone and downgraded a number of names.

Having said that, as Bob said, a lot of the non-investment-grade producers are subject to a borrowing base, if that helps. Also a lot of the large Canadian players tend to be diversified. They have liquidity, they still have access to capital, so they can withstand the volatility. And then, in my prepared remarks, I also talked about the mitigating measures that producers themselves were taking. And now, the fact that oil prices have picked up as well helps. But overall, if you look at our producer exposure, like it's less than 1% of gross loans and BA, so it's still very small.

Sohrab Movahedi -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

Ajai, if I could just have a quick follow-up on that. When you look at that portion that was downgraded, can you give me a sense of how much of those that were downgraded would have been originated in the last 12 to 18 months?

Ajai Bambawale -- Group Head and Chief Risk Officer

I wouldn't know that. I think we kind of looked at everything. But I didn't...

Sohrab Movahedi -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

I just want to know if there was a skew toward the more recent vintages. There has been a pretty good growth in Bob's business. I just want to have a feel for how much of it has been like maybe late into the -- late cycle growth, so to speak.

Bob Dorrance -- Group Head, Wholesale Banking

I think that very little of that in Canada, and some part of that, we would have originated in '17 and '18. Some of the -- but some of the -- we've been in the business for a long period of time, Sohrab. So it's -- there definitely are some new names. The vintage would be '17 and '18, but there are a lot of preexisting names as well.

Sohrab Movahedi -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

Thank you.

Bob Dorrance -- Group Head, Wholesale Banking

You're welcome.

Operator

Thank you. The next question is from Doug Young from Desjardins Capital Markets. Please go ahead.

Doug Young -- Desjardins Capital Markets -- Analyst

Hi. Good afternoon. Just going back to the strategic card book, and I just noticed that targets indicated that the revenue share from the profit sharing income from the credit card program actually increased year-over-year. It just struck me as strange given the sizable PCL you took that you ran through corporate. And I see -- and I haven't had a chance to go look at the examples that are at the back and understand that, I think, the profit share is based more on charge-offs than PCLs, but just trying to understand a bit of the nuance there just in case I'm missing something. Thank you.

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

No, Doug, the differences are exactly as you point out. Number one that the retailers are not financial institutions or subject to IFRS 9 in the way that we are. And there are timing differences in the determination and payment of their cash flows under the waterfall agreement.

Doug Young -- Desjardins Capital Markets -- Analyst

And so, essentially that provision you've set up as it rolls through from a charge-off, that would hit -- wouldn't hit you obviously, but it would hit them and that would come through the allowances that you've set up for that?

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Well, if you can think of it that in the Corporate segment, we carry the partners' share off their revenue, the partners' shares of the credit losses and then the accrued payments to the partners over time gets charged to non-interest expenses. So, that's essentially how it works out that some of the recoveries or payments may come at different points in time under the waterfalls.

Doug Young -- Desjardins Capital Markets -- Analyst

Okay. Got it. Okay. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Your next question is from Nigel D'Souza from Veritas. Please go ahead.

Nigel D'Souza -- Veritas -- Analyst

Thank you. Good afternoon. So, I wanted to touch on the scores you had in deferral loans. And when I look at the balances, your levels of deferrals seem to be better than some of your peers have reported so far, especially on commercial lending side. So I was wondering if you could provide some color on how you administered those deferral programs? Were you more selective on who you grant deferrals to? And is there any relation between the lower levels of deferrals we're seeing in your book and the higher performing PCLs that have been taken this quarter or are those two items completely unrelated?

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Maybe first, Teri, you might want to take it as to how the deferrals worked out?

Teri Currie -- Group Head, Canadian Personal Banking

For sure. Thank you. I'll start with real estate secured lending, and this indicates the -- because that's the majority from a personal perspective. The way that that occurs is that across our channels we have our advice and tools available to customers to help them understand not only the benefit [Indecipherable] of taking a deferral but also the cost to them of doing so. And so, we don't know for every individual customer their circumstance, but what I would say is that our goal is to ensure they really understand the deferral when they take it. For those applications, for those at secured lending deferrals that came through and were decisions, the approval rate closed to 100%.

So, I think we're meeting the customers' needs to get them the deferral as it's appropriate. They judge it to be appropriate for them and we facilitate it. I would say, we've had about 8,000 accounts roll off, a one-month deferral and so far those things will be performing well.

From a commercial standpoint, it would be more business-by-business decisioning. And then, there'd be a range across the consumer lending categories. Most of the other consumer lending are auto finance -- the finance [Phonetic].

Nigel D'Souza -- Veritas -- Analyst

Okay. That's really helpful. On the second part of that question about performing loans, for these deferred loans, are the majority of them still in stage one and are you waiting? So I guess they will off the deferral period before you decide on...

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Got it.

Nigel D'Souza -- Veritas -- Analyst

...or to migrate to stage two or three?

Teri Currie -- Group Head, Canadian Personal Banking

There wouldn't be cost -- sorry, go ahead.

Ajai Bambawale -- Group Head and Chief Risk Officer

I can take that. I can take that, Teri. So we did change the probability of default of all the borrower risk rating where loans got deferred. So that was just to show the fact that you're going to defer and didn't drive the PD or the BRR. But what I will say about deferrals is that if no deferrals had existed or we haven't made any deferrals, I would actually be building a higher allowance, like I view the deferral programs to be ultimately risk reducing. But I haven't assumed that it's completely and totally risk reducing. We've given some benefit for the risk reduction but we have built reserves for these deferral programs because in our view it is a matter of time before some becomes delinquent, others may become impaired as well.

Nigel D'Souza -- Veritas -- Analyst

That's really helpful. Appreciate the comments. Thanks.

Operator

Thank you. The next question is from Scott Chan from Canaccord Genuity. Please go ahead.

Scott Chan -- Canaccord Genuity -- Analyst

Good afternoon. My question is on the NIM and maybe for Greg and Teri's perspective. We saw a pretty, I guess down margin sequentially. Again now that rates are low, I don't know like much lower, hopefully not on both sides of the border, does that signal that maybe we should see more stabilization on the margin into fronts? Thanks.

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Riaz, do you want to cover generally on the overall NIM. And then maybe you can go Teri, and Greg.

Riaz Ahmed -- Group Head and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, Scott as you know because of the very rapid rate reductions in the second quarter in response to -- Central Bank's response to COVID, you get the short-term impact almost immediately and then the long-term comes in as the tractors rollout and depending on the longer-term yield curves. So really from a quarter-to-quarter perspective those rate cuts came in the middle of the quarter and so there'll be a full quarter [Phonetic] impact going into the next quarter. So we would see further margin compression into Q3 just from the short-term rates.

Teri Currie -- Group Head, Canadian Personal Banking

So, this is Teri. The only thing I would add to what Riaz side because he said given we'll have the full Q3 sort of impact. So that should further erode margins, all other things being equal. The only thing I would add is that the erosion in Canadian retail, a big portion of that was that we had for about half the quarter the difference between prime and SEDAR [Phonetic] compressing quickly and notably, it restored to more normal levels by the end of April, but that from a real estate secured lending perspective for all of our prime-based loans did create some compression. So that is another factors.

Greg Braca -- Group Head, US Retail

So the only thing I'd add from US I think that was covered well would be the other things we talk about every quarter, would be the factors such as mix of the business and all of that, that will play into it from quarter-to-quarter, but the other item is in the US, you would have known that we effectively had six rate cuts in two sessions in early March and that wasn't completely for a full quarter. So we'll see the full quarterization of that in Q3. As well as the fact because of market disruption, LIBOR was a lot higher than fed funds after the rate cuts and now that LIBOR is returning to more normalized levels you will see further effects of that in the NIM in Q3 as well.

Scott Chan -- Canaccord Genuity -- Analyst

Thank you very much.

Operator

Thank you. The next question is from Darko Mihelic from RBC Capital Markets. Please go ahead.

Darko Mihelic -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

Right, thank you. I just wanted to follow up on the deferral programs and given pretty good disclosure on the difference between the US and Canada in terms of amount and it seemingly looks like it's a bit shorter in the US in terms of the length of the deferral longer in Canada. And then just, timing and well Ajai said about the risk reduction, so when I look at this from the outside looking in, in the US, you're going to have a wall of people required to pay again in about three months on average looks like little later in Canada. Would you consider at that point in time deferring again if you find circumstances warrant it or from where you sit today you consider that this was enough and, and we won't have to have deferrals again?

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Greg, Greg you want to start off and then maybe I'll end.

Greg Braca -- Group Head, US Retail

I'm happy to. And thanks for the question. I would just say that in the US, first of all, our lens is around what the regulatory guidance and what are we seeing as far as the general market conditions obviously also guided our view about how we went at this and you're right, for the most part the deferral programs, whether it was consumer programs across a wide range of products, including mortgage and home equity or unsecured lending or our order book as well as small business and those will be more standardized programs and the general tenure was 90-day extension. But each of those programs was meant to have a view about what the conditions are like, what the environment is like and what may be needed 90 days out.

When you look at the mortgage book, specifically, it gets a little bit more complicated because obviously mortgages that are sold into the secondary market, the GSEs are involved and there is some guidance around that, that allows for restructuring after the 90 days either to the back end of the loan or a complete restructuring of the loan. Small business has its own nuance and then the rest of the consumer categories. So I'd say yes, we will certainly look at conditions, as well as what we can do from an accounting standpoint and a regulatory standpoint as well.

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Darko, this is Bharat. Just to add, when this deferral programs, particularly in the US, what Greg has talked about through TD Cares that we introduced, I mean those were done immediately when the lockdown started and since then you've seen lots of other programs introduced in the US market, the triple B program, Main Street lending program is just about to be introduced, you saw this direct payments going to Americans as well from the US Treasury. So I think the view there is that this programs are meant tide people over until this other programs come into play and hopefully all of them work because the Triple B program is geared toward folks getting their jobs back because that's how the program works. So hopefully, all those things work out, hard to predict precisely -- exactly what might happen 90 days from now. And as Greg said there are other nuances here in the US that we will have to take into consideration. So hard to, to give you a definitive answer at this stage.

Darko Mihelic -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

Okay, thank you.

Operator

Thank you. There are no further questions at this time, I'd like to turn the meeting back over to Mr. Bharat Masrani.

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, operator and thank you all for joining us. A tough quarter, no doubt, but given the circumstance I think it was the right thing for us to book the allowances that Ajai has talked about, and I do want to take this opportunity to thank our 90,000 colleagues around the world. I mean we have changed and how we operate this bank overnight. Folks have been working from home, others have been looking after customers at various TD locations. So I could not be more proud as to what they continue to do and deliver for all of our stakeholders, including our shareholders. So thank you for that. And folks, hopefully you know, we will meet in different circumstances 90 days from now. And I wish all of you well, and your families as well. Stay safe. Bye-bye.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Duration: 78 minutes

Call participants:

Gillian Manning -- Head of Investor Relations

Bharat Masrani -- Group President and Chief Executive Officer

Riaz Ahmed -- Group Head and Chief Financial Officer

Ajai Bambawale -- Group Head and Chief Risk Officer

Teri Currie -- Group Head, Canadian Personal Banking

Greg Braca -- Group Head, US Retail

Bob Dorrance -- Group Head, Wholesale Banking

John Aiken -- Barclays -- Analyst

Gabriel Dechaine -- National Bank Financial -- Analyst

Ebrahim Poonawala -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Steve Theriault -- Eight Capital -- Analyst

Meny Grauman -- Cormark Securities -- Analyst

Sumit Malhotra -- Scotiabank -- Analyst

Mario Mendonca -- TD Securities -- Analyst

Sohrab Movahedi -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

Doug Young -- Desjardins Capital Markets -- Analyst

Nigel D'Souza -- Veritas -- Analyst

Scott Chan -- Canaccord Genuity -- Analyst

Darko Mihelic -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

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