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Plantronics, inc (PLT) Q1 2022 Earnings Call Transcript

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PLT earnings call for the period ending June 30, 2021.

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Plantronics, inc (POLY)
Q1 2022 Earnings Call
Jul 29, 2021, 5:00 p.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good day, and thank you for standing by. And welcome to Poly Q1 Fiscal Year 2022 Conference Call. [Operator Instructions] Please be advised that today's conference is being recorded. [Operator Instructions] I would now like to hand the call over to your speaker today, Mr. Mike Iburg, Head of Investor Relations.

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Michael R. Iburg -- Vice President of Investor Relations

Welcome to Poly's financial results conference call for the first quarter of fiscal year 2022. My name is Mike Iburg, Head of Investor Relations. And joining me today are Dave Shull, Poly President and CEO; and Chuck Bollington, Executive Vice President and CFO. The information presented and discussed today includes forward-looking statements, which are made under the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. The risks and uncertainties related to such statements are detailed in our most recent 10-Q, 10-K and today's press release and earnings presentation. You should also refer to the materials provided today for an explanation of the non-GAAP financial measures discussed on this call, along with a reconciliation of those measures to the nearest applicable GAAP measures. These non-GAAP measures are indicators that management uses to provide additional meaningful comparisons between current results and previously reported results and as a basis for planning and forecasting future periods. All of our earnings materials are posted on our Investor Relations website at investor.poly.com. With that, I will now turn the call over to Dave.

David Shull -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Thanks, Mike. Good afternoon from California, and thanks for joining us from wherever you work. Today, Chuck and I are calling in from our Santa Cruz office. Poly delivered strong financial results for the quarter. Chuck will provide more detail, but the headline numbers are as follows. GAAP revenues of $431 million were above our guidance range of $410 million to $430 million and up 21% year-over-year. And adjusted EBITDA of $61 million and non-GAAP EPS of $0.60 were also above the guidance ranges and represent year-over-year growth of 29% and 82%, respectively. Gross margins of 44.8% reflect temporary pressures created by global supply chain issues that we spoke about at length during our Investor Day, including volatile component supply and transportation costs. Poly moderated these issues with quick action managing both OpEx and investment spend during the quarter. Finally, as part of our strategic transformation, we recognized a onetime restructuring charge of $29 million. We are minimizing G&A costs, investing in sales and marketing and reallocating R&D to areas of growth. On the product side, our launch of the Voyager Focus two headset at the very beginning of the quarter has been a huge success, shipping roughly 50,000 units. And we sold our 30 millionth Blackwire headset in the quarter, a product [Indecipherable] sold and recognized with their 2021 Global Product Leadership award, citing unmatched audio quality and innovation that addresses customer needs.

In July, Microsoft named Poly one of three finalists for the Device Partner of the Year award due to our excellence in innovation and implementation of customer solutions for teams. Finally, we entered into an OEM relationship with one of the top three global PC manufacturers to supply our high-quality professional headsets, making it even easier for end users to access our pro grade communications gear and moving us one step closer to our goal of reclaiming the number-one position in the headset market; all of which is to say we've been busy. But there is much more to do. We had said at the beginning of the year that anyone looking for a "return to normal" would be disappointed because there's no normal to return to. And so far, we've been spot on. First, the transformative shifts we see in enterprise communications -- for example, every meeting moving to video -- and the increasing complexities of managing communications infrastructure are intact and accelerating. Second, the aftershocks of the pandemic are still with us as our customers grapple each state to manage highly distributed workforces, even as new uncertainties present themselves. Right now, for example, the worldwide surge in delta variant cases continues to disrupt countries and economies.

These uncertainties mean that more than ever, Poly is a critical partner for any business navigating the current environment, something that is reflected in each of our business segments and across all of our geographies. Remember that long term, we actually benefit from the return to the office. At the same time, as we detailed during our Investor Day, Poly's challenge as a business, a challenge shared by every company in the world that makes and ships products, is how to manage volatile global supply chain factors so that ultimately, our customers get the gear they need. First, let's talk about the demand side of our business. Looking at our product lines, we again had strong growth in video. We saw a 94% increase in sales year-over-year, and that number would have been even bigger without supply chain pressures. We're pretty certain that we're taking share in the category. We're now the number-one single codec provider in the world measured by units. And according to research by synergy, we gained 13 points of revenue market share year-over-year in USB conference cameras, the largest Video category. And we think it still keeps growing. I can't think of a single company I've met with, large or small, that doesn't recognize the shift to video is inevitable. It's not just businesses.

Our results this quarter were also boosted by strong sales in government and education. Voice delivered strong results this quarter with a 34% year-over-year gain and a slight sequential decline down 5% is a function of supply chain impact. As businesses around the world continue to transition to the cloud, it creates an opportunity for IT service providers to deliver upgraded equipment to their customers. Poly partners closely with many ITSPs to ensure our gear ends up on the desktop. In addition, businesses are preparing for return-to-office, and we're seeing increased demand for conference room phones. Sales during the quarter were constrained by supply, and we see continued growth, thanks to the ongoing upgrade cycle. As we make progress managing supply shortages, we'll be able to catch up on our existing backlog. Finally, we see stable headset demand as the tension between work from home and return to the office continues to be unresolved. Sales were roughly flat year-over-year. And the sequential drop of 16% suggests to us that, in part, buyers are pausing in anticipation of return-to-office. We see growing demand in our Bluetooth headsets, including the new Voyager Focus two and recently announced Voyager 4300. But looking ahead, we expect seasonal weakness for our USB connected Blackwire headsets in Europe that will likely net out against demand upticks in the Americas and APAC.

So let's take a look at our regions. In the Americas, we continue to see strong demand across all product categories. Every customer I talk to says the same thing: Every medium is moving to video, and every meeting will always have at least one remote participant. Demand for video in the Americas is up 70% year-on-year in the market. We are also seeing strong demand for Voice products as businesses prepare for a return to the office. And headset demand remains stable as professionals continue to make sure they are prepared for long-term hybrid work. Our expectation is that all these demand drivers will remain in place for the balance of the year and well into the future. Europe continues to be hampered by uneven vaccination rates, a fragmented and still-evolving response to the COVID delta variant, and general uncertainty surrounding when workforces will return to the office and what that return will look like. While our sales pipeline is growing, we see this caution reflected in delayed deployments for Video, even as its ultimate importance to communications is clear. Voice demand is strong in Europe, but component shortages are affecting Poly's ability to supply products.

Headset demand is stabilizing as last year's work-from-home surge has largely been satisfied. Near term, we're heading into a seasonally soft summer demand period in Europe, which right now is being compounded by jumps in the delta variant, cloud and return-to-office plans. In Asia Pacific, we are seeing particularly strong demand in Australia, New Zealand and China. While there have been some return-to-office delays, in general, APAC has returned, remained in the office more than in other regions. As a result, our video pipeline in Asia has been increasing rapidly with strong demand for pro grade headsets and, to a lesser extent, phones as well. Taken together, all the demand drivers for Poly are intact and will be for some time to come. This is encouraging, because it means the long-term growth targets we set for ourselves are achievable. Demand is strong.

So let me now turn to our supply chain. Our current issues won't come as a surprise. Because, first, we cataloged them in May. And second, they've been experienced by companies everywhere, our front-page news in the national press and even caught the attention of the President. Just two weeks ago, the Washington post ran a front-page story headlined "Biden targets high shipping costs as pandemic ravages global supply chains." Now "ravages" is a pretty hyperbolic word. That said, our margins were pressured this quarter by price volatility in the spot market for certain units. As highlighted in the Washington Post article, shipping availability and costs are also both challenging. I'll repeat what I said last quarter about the supply chain issues: Our view is that these challenges are temporary. Right now, we think the right thing to do is to be conservative and assume that supply chain conditions will be unsettled for the balance of calendar year 2021.

We've also made the decision to insulate our customers from these pressures rather than to increase the cost of them. That's necessarily going to create margin pressure. But that, again, represents a near-term, short-term strategic decision we have made.

I will also say that we're seeing signs of stabilization with increasing commercial air traffic. And more space is opening up in airfreight channels. In addition, Grant, Grant Hoffman, who runs our supply chain, has been able to move a number of our product lines to water, all of which will show this cost savings. To be clear, we want to be able to build and ship more gear at a lower cost than we are doing today. As we detailed during the Investor Day, we've been working not only to improve the whole of our supply chain but also directly with our customers so we can help them manage order timing and deployments. Near term.

Like many, we're looking at a pretty significant collection of variables, shipping and component costs and availabilities, uneven recovery from COVID and the global spike in the delta variant and related economic closures. We get new information every day. But as we look forward, we are encouraged. First, demand is strong. Chuck will provide more details, but we expect to have sequential quarter-over-quarter revenue growth. Second, the broad secular trends that support Poly's growth are intact. We still believe there are strong underlying double-digit growth in our markets. Third, we're working tirelessly on our supply chain. This means we expect to be able to deliver sequential revenue growth for our investors, even as in the near term, our margins will continue to be under pressure. Last, before I turn the call over to Chuck, so he can go through the numbers and give you a sense of how we're setting up for the second quarter, I do want to point out that over the course of the past few quarters, Chuck and his team have transformed our balance sheet. Our borrowing costs are down, and leverage is decreasing. We're carefully managing our resources and investments and, at the same time, remain committed to our long-term growth goals for our revenues and our margins. Yes, these goals are ambitious, but we believe we can attain them. We have the right gear, the right people and the right technology to get there. Chuck, now over to you.

Chuck. Boynton -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer & Principal Financial Officer

Thanks, Dave. As Dave mentioned, it was another strong quarter based on year-over-year revenue trends but, as we expected, down from last quarter. In spite of the global supply chain challenges, we're able to secure additional components and capacity to deliver revenue above the top end of our estimates. While we were able to satisfy additional customer demand, the offset to that was increased freight and costs associated with spot market purchases. Non-GAAP revenue was $432 million, a 20% increase from the prior year, driven primarily by Video and Voice, which were up 94% and 34%, respectively. We spoke about accelerating demand for desktop phones last quarter, which continues unabated. And we are now seeing stronger demand for conference room phones, growing 23% sequentially and 33% year-over-year. We view this, along with strong Video demand, as a clear indication of building momentum around return-to-office. It seems that return-to-office changes as the news changes. While we've benefited from work-from-home, we expect our business to be stronger when there is a more substantial return to the office. This has proven out as our sales pipeline has expanded globally, as companies prepare to return to the office. Service revenue was $61 million, as expected down 12% year-over-year due to service contracts on legacy systems being replaced with lower-cost and disruptive next-gen Video gear.

We expect this trend to continue over time and eventually change direction and start to grow again in the future. Last quarter, we highlighted our expectation that supply chain challenges would impact gross margins by several hundred basis points sequentially. And, as expected, gross margins declined 360 basis points from the prior quarter. Our current expectations are that spot market purchases and continued elevated freight, coupled with the mix shift toward desktop funds, will continue to negatively impact gross margins in the near term. Operating expenses were down slightly year-over-year at $142 million, and operating income of $52 million was up 42%. As Dave mentioned, the demand environment for Poly products remains strong despite supply chain challenges. Our next-gen Video solutions continue to gain traction. And although sell-through was impacted by supply shortages and shipment linearity, sales out of the channel were up 245% year-over-year, even though we shipped over 25% of our new video units in the last week of the quarter. Backlog remains elevated and has shifted to Video and Voice as enterprise customers prepare to return to the office. Lastly, channel inventory was up slightly compared to the prior quarter due to a significant amount of shipments late in the quarter.

Turning to cash. Operating cash flow is impacted by the overlapping interest on the 2023 and 2029 bonds and the payout of variable compensation from fiscal '21, resulting in slightly positive operating cash flow for the quarter. We ended the quarter with $213 million of cash and short-term investments. With the 2023 bonds now retired and a new interest rate hedge in place, we expect interest expense to be approximately $16 million per quarter going forward. Turning to guidance. The demand environment remains strong and, under ordinary circumstances, would support significantly higher revenue in fiscal Q2. As we said in our last earnings call and at Investor Day, we are clearly targeting sequential revenue growth in Q2. However, as we continue to experience challenges associated with the global semiconductor chip shortage, the situation remains fluid. As a result, we are providing guidance largely similar to what we provided in Q1. Our long-term views on Poly's financial model have not changed. But we continue to see near-term pressure on gross margins due to freight spot market purchases and absorption of factory costs.

These impacts on margins may be more pronounced in Q2. Based on our current view of components, supplier commitments and impacts of COVID-19 and its variants, we expect to deliver financial results for fiscal Q2 within the following ranges: GAAP revenue, $420 million to $440 million; adjusted EBITDA, $50 million to $60 million; non-GAAP earnings per share, $0.50 to $0.70. Our non-GAAP tax rate is expected to be 14% to 16%, and the shares outstanding should be approximately $44 million. Regarding our tax rate. A onetime benefit impacted the fiscal Q1 non-GAAP tax rate. However, we still expect a full year non-GAAP rate of 14% to 16%. Lastly, there are several discrete tax items that may be resolved this quarter, potentially creating a significant favorable impact to our results. Since it's difficult to predict the timing and magnitude, the tax rate we are providing excludes this impact. The model we outlined at Investor Day remains intact, and we're optimistic regarding our ability to deliver long-term value to our shareholders through revenue growth and continued improvement in our net leverage. I'll now turn the call over to the operator to begin the Q&A. Operator?

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Your first question is from Amit Daryanani of Evercore. Your line is now open.

Amit Daryanani -- Evercore -- Analyst

Good afternoon everyone and Ill take in my question. I have two, I guess. First off, Chuck, I was just hoping if you could quantify the supply chain impact you had on your P&L for both June, and what do you think it's going to be for September? I think June, you had talked about $60 million topline, 200 basis points on the margin? Just an update on that, and how does that headwind translate into September, would be helpful.

Chuck. Boynton -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer & Principal Financial Officer

Certainly, Amit, thank you for the question. The June impact and the September impact -- we're cautious about September. The situation has not really changed that much. We have gotten additional supply, and it drove to a pretty strong end of quarter for us. We're proud of our team. They worked incredibly hard and have really strong shipments, but the products came in late in the quarter. And as a result, we're cautious about margins in Q2, partially because the component spot purchases didn't have a full impact in Q1, so we're cautious there. Although we're optimistic on getting additional supply for Q1, so we're targeting revenue growth in Q2. The margin impact is pretty straightforward. At Investor Day, we outlined a model that we think is north of 50% gross margins. And I think that would have been the case in both Q1 and Q2, if not for the supply chain challenges. And we have a very detailed chart, as you'll remember from Analyst Day, that sort of breaks that out. And so I think it's pretty clear that if not for these disruptions, revenue would be significantly higher, and margins would be north of 50%.

Amit Daryanani -- Evercore -- Analyst

Got it. Thats really helpful and then, kind of just follow-up on the Video side of the equation? You continue to see some really impressive growth over here. I think compares start to get difficult in the back half of your fiscal year. So love to give some sense, how do you think of Video growing? Or what does that look like in the fiscal year for you? And then, how should [Indecipherable] the puts and takes as maybe return-to-work gets paused or pushed out a little bit for the video market, specifically?

David Shull -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Yes, Amit, this is Dave. Let me take that one, and Chuck and provide color commentary afterwards if he wants. So the demand for video remains very, very strong. It is tied actually to return-to-office. And so my commentary on the delta COVID variant, in Europe specifically, is they've had some delays on the return to the office with delta. And so I think that is -- that has driven out some of the projects to later in the year. The pipeline on Video is the healthiest I've ever seen. And so the pipeline continues to grow. So the demand is massive. I guess what I would say is there's been real supply constraints on the Video products as well, tied to both imaging sensors but also some of the chips. But we remain very, very optimistic on the demand for this fiscal year for Video and also on our ability to continue to take market share the way we have been with our Video products.

Amit Daryanani -- Evercore -- Analyst

Perfect. Thank you very much.

Chuck. Boynton -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer & Principal Financial Officer

Thanks Amit. Next question.

Operator

Your next question is from Meta Marshall of Morgan Stanley. Your line is now open.

Erik Lapinski -- Morgan Stanley -- Analyst

Hi. This is Erik on for Meta. Maybe if I could go back to the gross margin step-down, understand things could look worse in September, but you've also talked about some mitigation efforts you're putting through. So I'm wondering, just as we think through the rest of the year and into next year, how should we think about the cadence to potentially start improving some of the impacts you're seeing? Is it purely the broader macro issues starting to improve? Or is there anything your efforts can do to start driving improvement aside from that?

David Shull -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Let me hit the efforts, and then Chuck can talk about the macro issues. Simple answer is absolutely. We've put some pretty significant cost targets on our team in terms of more efficiency. There's factory utilization tied to that, of course, which is probably driven by our throughput. But the team is doing design-to-value kind of all over the place. And there's some pretty substantial targets on the supply chain team to get us there. The far bigger factor, though, is the macro issues that Chuck has mentioned, which is the price premiums that we're paying for components and the freight issues. I don't know if Chuck wants to talk about that more?

Chuck. Boynton -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer & Principal Financial Officer

Yes, Erik. So as you think about sort of drivers, purchase price variance, where you're buying spot market purchases and whatnot, I don't know when those will go away entirely. They will, but I'm not sure when they fully abate. We're getting commitments for additional supply from the suppliers where we can buy direct versus in the spot market, and that will help. But it will take a quarter to flow through inventory. So I think that will be a good guy in the back half of the year. Dave talked about freight a little bit. And we've seen more airline traffic, which should drive down freight costs. Of course, the December quarter can be challenging because of Christmas and all the buying. But I think the water shipment routes are getting better.

There is a container shortage right now. And so we're starting to put some of the products that are not supply constrained on the water. So that should help as well in the back half of the year. But I guess the good news is Grant Hoffman and the work he's been doing. He's been here now for two quarters. He's put a new team in place, and they are working really hard to secure significant additional supply in the back half of the year. So while we can't forecast with precision the back half of the year, I think Dave and I are quite optimistic that we will see really strong revenue quarters in the back half of the year and see year-over-year revenue growth. Erik, maybe I'll comment a little bit more on that to provide a bit more specificity, even though it wasn't directly your question, but I think it's an important comment, which is, in the past, we've made short-term buys a quarter out, two quarters out at most. We knew we had to make some changes when we brought in Grant and a whole new team. We acknowledged those issues back in May.

We're now making orders a year or more out on the long lead components. And we're being aggressive to match the demand that we see to the supply. And it's changing the dialogue in a very, very healthy way with our suppliers, where they're excited about the upside for our business. And there's still allocation issues. We're still battling with the likes of Apple and some big players. But the fact that we're willing to bet on the business a year-plus out is encouraging to them. And I think is what has given us optimism that we'll see sequential growth this quarter and for a few quarters to come here. Obviously. So we're pushing as hard as we can here.

Erik Lapinski -- Morgan Stanley -- Analyst

Appreciate the helpful color. Thank you.

Chuck. Boynton -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer & Principal Financial Officer

Thanks Erik.

Operator

Your next question is from Greg Burns of Sidoti & Company. Your line is open.

Greg Burns -- Sidoti & Company -- Analyst

Good afternoon. Just want to talk about the professional headset business. Just a little bit surprised by the magnitude of the sequential decline. It's high year-over-year, but that was a depressed quarter, kind of a COVID-depressed quarter from a year ago. So we're back below [Technical Issues] like pre-COVID levels. So I just wanted to get a feeling for what's going on in that market. Are you [Technical Issues] market share? I know you rolled out a handful of new products like speaker phones and other things. Were probably going to fill some product gaps for you and help on the revenue front. But if you can just maybe talk about what you're seeing in that market, from a demand perspective as well as from a market share perspective?

David Shull -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Yes, this is Dave. I'll provide some high level commentary. And then again, as always can chime in with other points that he sees fit. So the contact center business continues to be very soft. We're not seeing much of a return by the call centers yet. We're monitoring that. But that business is down Q-over-Q almost 20%, and it's down year-over-year, 37% still. So there's a substantial weakening there. I think what's probably more interesting to me is the dynamic around sort of our traditional USB connected Blackwire headsets versus Bluetooth. And we are seeing some softness in Europe around the Blackwire headsets. We don't believe we lost market share there, but we're watching that carefully. And obviously, we're waiting for some of our competitors to share their results. We are seeing a general softening for those wired products in Europe. We are not seeing that in the Americas or APAC. We're seeing continued strong demand, which has given us comfort that I think we're going to see sequential growth in our headset business quarter-over-quarter. I'm also seeing a lot of demand for the Bluetooth products, so specifically the new Focus product that I mentioned and the 4300 Voyager products. We are constrained on some chips for those products. And so demand is outstripping supply, specifically on the Bluetooth side. So to summarize, yes, the quarter was down. I do think you will see significant sequential growth Q-over-Q for the headset business, driven by the factors that I just mentioned.

Greg Burns -- Sidoti & Company -- Analyst

Okay. Great. Thanks and in terms of OpEx, did a great job [Technical Issues] this quarter; it came in kind of well below what we were looking for and down pretty significantly sequentially. So how much of that is variable or temporary versus permanent? Like how should we think about OpEx as the year progresses?

Chuck. Boynton -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer & Principal Financial Officer

Yes, thanks, Greg, it's Chuck. We're trying really hard to protect our margins. You saw a restructuring charge this past quarter. And we're doing everything we can to drive efficiencies in G&A. We're investing in sales and marketing, actually. So we're putting more resources out on the field to drive revenue growth and capture this wave of demand, and then, more importantly, reallocating engineering resources to future areas of growth. So that's certainly helped a little bit on the expense side as well as just the company. The employees have done a phenomenal job responding in a tough time where we're supply constrained with an abundance of demand. And with that, we've pulled together and rallied and have been able to drive costs out. We plan to continue to be cautious on spending while supply is constrained. I would expect longer-term OpEx to grow above these levels as revenue returns and we have more supply. But I would sort of expect the numbers to be somewhat in line next quarter.

Greg Burns -- Sidoti & Company -- Analyst

Okay, thanks and in terms of the cash flow, do you have a target of [Technical Issues] this quarter for the reasons you outlined. But for full year, do you have any view on generation?

Chuck. Boynton -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer & Principal Financial Officer

Yes. So we talked about, at Analyst Day, about $150 million of operating cash flow. That would still be our target for this year. Q1, we had some restructuring and sort of timing. Q2 will likely -- just because the profile of revenue and shipments being somewhat back-end loaded, that Q2 will not be a great cash quarter given the profile. But that will set us up for a strong Q3 and Q4. And we would expect material operating cash flow in both Q3 and Q4, similar to last year, actually, where that was a very similar profile to what we did last year. And we drove very, very strong both operating and free cash flow in Q3 and Q4 last year. And then that would obviously drive continued de-levering.

Greg Burns -- Sidoti & Company -- Analyst

Okay. Great. Thank you.

David Shull -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Thanks Greg.

Operator

Your next question is from Paul Silverstein of Cowen. Your line is now open. Paul, your line is now open.

Paul Silverstein -- Cowen -- Analyst

Guys, can you hear me?

Chuck. Boynton -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer & Principal Financial Officer

Yes.

David Shull -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Yes.

Paul Silverstein -- Cowen -- Analyst

Sorry, I'm still learning how to work an iPhone. My apologies. On a serious note, I apologize if I'm asking you to repeat yourself, as I was passing through security in an airport during a portion of this call. I do apologize. But to extent you had strong results, somewhat disappointing guidance; albeit, I'd argue, net on balance positive. How much of the weakness you're looking at in the current quarter is due to supply constraints? How much of it is weak demand? And in connection to my question, I heard your comments about Europe. How much of your European business is headsets? What happened with your overall European business that would inform whether the headset issue is a competitive loss issue versus something else?

David Shull -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

This is Dave. First of all, at a macro level, the issue is all supply. So I am very, very confident, guiding up on an unconstrained demand basis. In fact, I would've guided much, much higher. We had said before that on a pure demand basis, we sequentially would have been above the $4.78 million for Q4. And I think that remains the case from a demand perspective. And so therefore, it's all about supply. Europe is up, overall, 33% year-over-year. It's down a little bit Q-over-Q, down 25% Q-over-Q. And that is on the video side that is supply constrained. On the headset side, there is definitely a softening of demand in EMEA. But it's offset by growing strengths in Europe and Asia Pac. So it was kind of a multiple series of stories that we're trying to interweave for you all so you can kind of get a macro sense. So at a macro level, I would say, Video growth through the roof, tons of demand. And we're flat out trying to make sure we solve the supply issue. Headsets stabilizing. I believe they're stabilizing somewhere between last quarter and this quarter. So to be specific, that's somewhere between 170 and 200. I do think you will see substantial increases this next quarter, bouncing back, but mainly in the Bluetooth area. And then Voice is growing, and we are very supply constrained there. But we're seeing a lot of growth in Voice that we'd like to be able to fulfill.

Chuck. Boynton -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer & Principal Financial Officer

And Paul, I would just add, both Americas and APAC had sequential growth in headset revenue. So if you looked at Q4 to Q1, both APAC and Americas had growth. So the decline in headsets was 100% driven by Europe, and mostly driven because of the shift from corded to cordless. And so I think we feel very good about the headset business globally. But I think Blackwire in Europe was softer. However, we believe we actually probably increased market share, though, in Europe.

Paul Silverstein -- Cowen -- Analyst

All right and then on the Video business, how much of your Video revenue is still "legacy" multi-tens of thousands of dollars or even 100,000-plus the old expensive room systems versus [Technical Issues]? What's the support this quarter?

Chuck. Boynton -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer & Principal Financial Officer

Let me get back to you here shortly. It's becoming a smaller and smaller piece. However, it's been pretty stable. I'll come back to you here shortly with a more precise answer on the percentage.

Paul Silverstein -- Cowen -- Analyst

That'd be great. But Chuck, you're indicating that the legacy business, you think the risk from here to [Indecipherable] been a drag on growth. In previous quarters, previous periods, you're indicating that you think that drag is done?

Chuck. Boynton -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer & Principal Financial Officer

Well, it started to asymptote. The percentage may have increased in Q1 because of the supply constraints in the new gear. But in terms of absolute dollars, we have been expecting a faster falloff of the legacy group systems, group series. And they've actually been selling quite well, a lot of it internationally and federal space. And so it's been a pleasant surprise last year how it held in there while the new products were ramping significantly.

Paul Silverstein -- Cowen -- Analyst

I've got one last question. Staying on Video, I assume when you ship to a customer, you don't know -- or maybe you do -- where those systems are being deployed. The question I'm driving toward, is the extent the huddle -- these far lower priced huddle room systems, the real opportunity is a dramatic market expansion going into rooms that you would put at $10,000, $50,000, $100,000 legacy system? Do you know how much of your huddle room systems are going into new rooms versus -- I assume no one rips and replace -- or maybe they do -- the old base systems. How much of it as one versus the other market expansion versus swap-outs?

David Shull -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

This is Dave. I think most of it is market expansion, Paul. But we don't know precisely, to answer your question directly. And the reason why I'm saying that is, usually, the older stuff that we have is in larger rooms. Very little of it's in the huddle rooms. And so by definition, when you put an X30 or X50 in, they're going into a different size of room, which drives some expansion.

Paul Silverstein -- Cowen -- Analyst

No, I'll pass them on. I appreciate your response. Chuck --

Chuck. Boynton -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer & Principal Financial Officer

And then, getting back to you -- so the legacy systems are about 25% of revenue dollars and about less than 10% of units.

Paul Silverstein -- Cowen -- Analyst

Perfect. Appreciate it. Thank you.

David Shull -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Thanks Paul.

Operator

No questions at this time. Please continue?

David Shull -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Great. Well, thank you all very much for taking the time to join us. And as always, I look forward to speaking with all of you again soon. Thank you.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Duration: 40 minutes

Call participants:

Michael R. Iburg -- Vice President of Investor Relations

David Shull -- President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Chuck. Boynton -- Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer & Principal Financial Officer

Amit Daryanani -- Evercore -- Analyst

Erik Lapinski -- Morgan Stanley -- Analyst

Greg Burns -- Sidoti & Company -- Analyst

Paul Silverstein -- Cowen -- Analyst

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