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Wolfspeed Inc (WOLF) Q1 2022 Earnings Call Transcript

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CREE earnings call for the period ending September 30, 2021.

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Wolfspeed (WOLF -5.62%)
Q1 2022 Earnings Call
Oct 27, 2021, 5:00 p.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good evening. Thank you for standing by, and welcome to the Wolfspeed, Inc. first-quarter fiscal year 2022 earnings call. At this time, all participants are in a listen-only mode.

[Operator instructions] Thank you. Please note today's call is being recorded. I would now like to hand the conference over to your first speaker today, Tyler Gronbach, vice president of investor relations. Please go ahead.

Tyler Gronbach -- Vice President of Investor Relations

Thank you, and good afternoon, everyone. Welcome to Wolfspeed's first-quarter fiscal 2022 conference call. Today, Wolfspeed's CEO, Gregg Lowe; and Wolfspeed's CFO, Neill Reynolds, will report on the results for the first quarter of fiscal year 2022. Please note that we will be presenting non-GAAP financial results during today's call, which is consistent with how management measures Wolfspeed's results internally.

Non-GAAP results are not in accordance with GAAP and may not be comparable to non-GAAP information provided by other companies. Non-GAAP information should be considered a supplement to and not a substitute for financial statements prepared in according with GAAP. A reconciliation to the most directly comparable GAAP measures is in our press release and posted in the Investor Relations section of our website, along with a historical summary of other key metrics. Today's discussion includes forward-looking statements about our business outlook, and we may make other forward-looking statements during the course of the call.

Such forward-looking statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties. Our news release today and the SEC filings noted in the release mention important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially, including risks related to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. During the Q&A session, we would ask that you limit yourself to one question and one follow-up so that we can accommodate as many questions as possible during today's call. If you have any additional questions, please feel free to contact us after the call.

And now I'd like to turn the call over to Gregg.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Tyler, and good afternoon, everyone. Thank you for joining us today, and I hope you and your families are staying healthy and safe. I am pleased to report that during the first quarter, we continued to execute and drive our business, delivering strong revenue above our guidance and non-GAAP diluted earnings per share at the high end of our guidance range. Now, this has been a momentous period for us.

We changed our name to Wolfspeed, capitalizing on our 30-year-plus heritage of working with silicon carbide. The next generation of power semiconductors will be driven by silicon carbide technology, with superior performance that unleashes new possibilities and positive changes to the way we live. As the original champion of this technology, we couldn't be more excited to compete and win in the rapidly expanding marketplace. As part of our move to Wolfspeed, we also are pleased to have joined the New York Stock Exchange earlier this month, as we continue on our transformational journey as a pure-play global semiconductor powerhouse leading the industry transition from silicon to silicon carbide.

We look forward to discussing the strong progress we've made on our transformational journey and strategy and share more detail about this exciting long-term outlook during our Investor Day in New York City next month. If you haven't received the registration link, please reach out to Tyler. I'll now turn it over to Neill, who will provide an overview of our financial results for the first quarter and our outlook for the second quarter of fiscal 2022. Neill?

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Gregg, and good afternoon, everyone. We delivered solid results during the first quarter as we continued to see increased demand for our devices and materials. Revenues for the first quarter of fiscal 2022 were $156.6 million, above the high end of our guidance range, representing an increase of 7.4% sequentially and 35.6% year over year. Our non-GAAP net loss was $23.8 million or $0.21 per diluted share at the top end of our guidance range.

Our first quarter non-GAAP earnings exclude $46.3 million of expense, net of tax, or $0.40 per diluted share for noncash stock-based compensation, acquired intangibles amortization, accretion on our convertible notes, project, transformation and transaction costs, factory optimization, start-up costs, and other items outlined in today's earnings release. Moving on to the first-quarter performance. We delivered our fifth consecutive quarter of sequential growth. In power, momentum continued to build as our customers have a demonstrated need for our products, resulting in revenue growth of 57% over the prior year.

For RF, we continue to see good activity on the 5G front, but performance was slightly muted due to output challenges. As we discussed on our last call, we did see some supply constraints and some lower productivity during the quarter as our Malaysian contract manufacturer continued to ramp activities back up following the recent COVID-19 outbreak. At this time, we do not expect any additional impact from the Malaysia shutdown as the factory continues to ramp toward a normal production schedule. Moving to materials.

We saw a better order flow during the quarter, which we expect will continue for the remainder of the fiscal year. First-quarter non-GAAP gross margin was 33.5%, compared to 32.3% last quarter. The sequential increase was driven by solid performance of materials and improving MOSFET costs and yields. As previously discussed, we view the gross margin impact as short-term in nature due to a suboptimal device production footprint we have in North Carolina and expect it to modestly improve going forward as we work through factory transitions and improve yields.

Looking at our consolidated results. Non-GAAP operating expense for Q1 were $86 million, and our non-GAAP tax rate was 27%. The increase in our operating expenses was largely due to R&D, including investment in our 200-millimeter pilot line in support of the Mohawk Valley ramp. For the first quarter, days sales outstanding was 53 days, and inventory days on hand was 154 days.

Cash generated from operations was negative $63 million. And capital expenditures were $209 million, resulting in negative free cash flow of $272 million. We believe we are in a solid position with approximately $850 million of cash and liquidity on hand to support our growth. However, we will be opportunistic from a capital market standpoint to ensure we can have the flexibility to invest as we see fit to continue to underpin our position in the market and fuel future growth.

As we continue our transition to a pure-play global semiconductor company, we will update our disclosures as appropriate and necessary. A few things I'd like to highlight this quarter. First, we incurred start-up costs, primarily related to the ramp at Mohawk Valley. Approximately $8.6 million was incurred in Q1, and we expect this to ramp throughout the remainder of the fiscal year.

As noted previously, we expect a total of approximately $80 million of start-up costs in fiscal 2022, with the majority of these costs incurred in the second half of the fiscal year as we qualify and ramp the fab. We have provided a non-GAAP adjustment for the start-up costs, as well as a reconciliation table in our earnings release. Second, as noted in the news release and as you'll see when we file the 10-Q tomorrow, now that we have successfully transitioned the company to Wolfspeed and are solely focused on our plans to be a leading global semiconductor provider, we've adjusted the expected useful lives of certain assets to better reflect their estimated economic lives for silicon carbide-based semiconductor business versus a company that was primarily focused on lighting and LED products. The change has resulted in a decrease in depreciation expense of $8.4 million for the first quarter.

The impact on first-quarter gross margin is relatively small. And we expect that to fade into the margins over the next few quarters. As we've previously mentioned, we are continuing to experience a significantly steeper demand curve from our customers for silicon carbide products than we had initially expected. This has led to supply constraints where some customer orders will not be fulfilled in fiscal year 2022.

And channel inventory levels will remain low until we ramp our production in our Mohawk Valley Fab. We're confident that we'd be able to meet this high demand, but in the meantime, we are continuing to accelerate capex capacity investments, and our team is working hard to improve output in our Durham facilities. We're anticipating net capital expenditures of approximately $475 million for the year, with Q1 representing the peak investment period. And we will start to see a modest step-down beginning in 2Q and continuing throughout the second half of the year as we receive more reimbursements for the Mohawk Valley construction.

We continue to pull in capacity expenditures where we can at the fiscal year 2022 to better support the steepening demand curves. We remain on track to operationalize the world's largest silicon carbide fab in the first half of calendar year 2022. We know many of our customers are focused on assurance of supply when it comes to silicon carbide, and we're committed to meeting that demand, given the steeper ramps that we're now expecting. Looking to the second quarter, we're encouraged by the positive momentum.

And as a reminder, progress will not be linear over the next few quarters as we ramp production at Mohawk Valley. In the second quarter of fiscal 2022, we are targeting revenue in the range of $165 million to $175 million. We expect revenue to be driven by strength across all of our product lines led by power devices. Our Q2 non-GAAP gross margin is expected to be in the range of 33.7% to 35.7%, which is an increase versus 1Q.

As we have stated previously, the key to our gross margin transition from the low 30s to 50% plus relies heavily on our fab cost footprint transition from North Carolina to Mohawk Valley. As we transition to that new footprint and qualify the factory in 2022 and drive revenue growth into 2023 and beyond, we will see the benefits of increasing production from our advanced 200-millimeter fab. Wafer processing costs in Mohawk Valley are expected to be more than 50% lower than Durham, not fully including the benefit from the diameter change from 150-millimeter to 200-millimeter. In addition, we expect cycle times in Mohawk Valley to be more than 50% better than in Durham and yields in Mohawk Valley to be 20 to 30 points higher than where we are in Durham today.

We are already seeing good evidence from our Mohawk Valley pilot lines to support these projections and anticipate a heavy margin improvement as we move to our new fab. We are targeting non-GAAP operating expense of $88 million for the second quarter. We expect operating expenses to continue to accrete modestly each quarter as we continue our investment in R&D and sales and marketing resources. We target Q2 non-GAAP operating loss to be between $32 million to $26 million and nonoperating net loss to be immaterial.

We expect our non-GAAP effective rate to be approximately 27%. We're targeting Q2 non-GAAP net loss to between $19 million to $23 million or a loss of $0.16 to $0.20 per diluted share. The EPS outlook for 2Q includes approximately $0.02 of benefit from the previously mentioned change in estimate of useful lives. Our non-GAAP EPS target excludes acquired intangibles amortization, noncash stock-based compensation, accretion on the convertible notes, project transformation and transaction costs, factory optimization restructuring and start-up costs, and other items.

Our Q2 targets are based on several factors that could vary greatly, including the situation with COVID-19, overall demand, product mix, factory productivity, and the competitive environment. With that, I will now turn the discussion back to Gregg.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Neill. We made remarkable progress on our transformational journey during our fiscal first quarter. Our power business continues to see strong demand from the automotive markets, and we are also encouraged by the increasing demand across a number of industrial and energy customers. The strength of our device opportunity pipeline, which now is about $18 billion, underscores the significant demand we're seeing not only for automotive power but also in RF, industrial, and energy solutions.

Now, if you recall, at our 2019 Investor Day, we showed a $9 billion device opportunity pipeline. So, we've doubled the pipeline in the last two years and now have more than 8,200 potential projects. And the team continues to identify additional opportunities at a rapid pace. Meanwhile, the sales team is converting these opportunities at an impressive rate, with approximately $560 million of design-ins awarded during the last quarter.

A significant portion of these were for automotive inverters, while we also continued to secure other interesting applications, including a wall charger for electric vehicles, an elevator, energy storage products, and an induction cooktop. Our massive device pipeline and continued success securing design-ins continues to give us confidence in our ability to achieve our target revenue for fiscal '24 of $1.5 billion, with current demand trends offering some potential upside based on the steepening demand curve for silicon carbide through 2024 and beyond. As we focus on executing across our business, we are pleased to see our strategy is further supported by developments in the broader market. Global electric vehicle sales are expected to be over 6 million this year according to consulting firm, Wood Mackenzie.

Electric vehicle sales in the first half of 2021 nearly tripled worldwide compared to the first half of last year. The share of electric vehicle sales in the global passenger car sales doubled compared to the same period last year. This performance provides another proof point of the end of the ICE age as consumers transition from internal combustion engine and embrace electric vehicles. And as more OEMs and Tier 1s leverage silicon carbide-based solutions for powertrain, on-board chargers, and off-board fast chargers, which increase the vehicle's range and reduce charge times, we expect the adoption rates to continue to increase.

President Biden, in his address last month to the UN General Assembly, reiterated his intent to work with Congress to make critical investments in green infrastructure and electric vehicles. In mid-September, U.S. lawmakers proposed an expansion of tax credits for electric vehicles that includes significantly higher subsidies for union-made zero-emission models assembled in the United States. We are continuing to see U.S.

automakers make big commitments to ramp up their electric vehicle efforts. For instance, in late September, Ford announced that it'd spend billions of dollars to build three battery factories and an electric truck plant in the United States, significantly increasing its commitment to electric cars and trucks. We remain well-positioned to capitalize on these opportunities as we are in the midst of increasing manufacturing capacity, including bringing online the world's largest silicon carbide fab in a matter of months. In fact, we believe our capacity expansion efforts were a critical factor that led General Motors to choosing us to provide power device solutions for its future electric vehicle program.

Our silicon carbide devices will enable GM to install more efficient EV propulsion systems in several different models that will extend the range of its rapidly expanding EV portfolio. The combination of Wolfspeed's global leadership in silicon carbide and GM's commitment to an all-electric future, including a plan to launch 30 electric vehicles globally by the end of '25, establishes a powerful partnership pushing the boundaries of electric vehicle innovation together. Our Mohawk Valley 200-millimeter fab remains on track to start qualification runs in the first half of 2022. We now have more than 50 of the primary ballroom tools placed in the cleanroom.

We've had an opportunity to host several global automotive executives at the site, and they were impressed with the level of automation and the overall scale of the operation. In Durham, we have major expansion underway right now to continue the growth of our materials capacity. The space conversion and refit up is actively being converted from an old lighting and office space into industrial space for significant growth of our crystal growth and epi capability. Our expansion enables us to increase the number of growers and take advantage of our continued crystal growth technology improvements, which increase production yield.

To avoid supply constraints, we've already ordered the majority of the long lead time items, including electrical substations and steel infrastructure. In terms of timing, we will start ramping phase 1 of this space in June of '22. In particular, it is being built out in three phases and gives us adequate growth capability through 2025 or 2026 depending on realized demand. In sum, as we move forward in our new capacity as Wolfspeed, we will continue to execute our strategy to create a global semiconductor powerhouse.

We continue to win business at a very good pace, while we're making necessary investments to deliver next-generation technology to our customers. We are excited about the opportunities ahead and are confident in our strategy and our path forward. We look forward to discussing the progress we've made on our transformational strategy and share more details about our long-term outlook during our Investor Day in New York next month. And with that, I'll turn it back over to the operator, and we can begin the Q&A session.

Questions & Answers:

Operator

[Operator instructions] And as a reminder, we are limiting question to one question and one follow-up, so please be mindful. The first question we have is from Vivek Arya with Bank of America. You may proceed. 

Blake Friedman -- Bank of America Securities -- Analyst

Hi. This is Blake Friedman on for Vivek. I was just curious, for my first question, at the beginning of the month, I believe you announced a strategic supply agreement with GM. Can you provide further details on the agreement or an overview of Wolfspeed's Assurance of Supply Program? And then relative to 90 days ago, can you kind of mention how customer engagement with auto OEMs have changed or progressed?

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Sure. On October 4th, we announced, jointly together with General Motors, a partnership with them as we're providing silicon carbide devices for their EV platforms. The program is slated to go into several different vehicles, and we'll be starting ramping after 2024. I can't get into a lot of other detail about that other than to say, it's a really great partnership that we have together with GM.

And I think in terms of the Assurance of Supply Program, this is a really -- I think this is a really key item for GM, and it's become a hot button for all of our customers that are currently experiencing a lot of supply issues in the silicon world. And as an integrated device manufacturer that has its own capabilities and materials, we're kind of in a unique position to be able to offer this kind of assurance of supply.

Blake Friedman -- Bank of America Securities -- Analyst

That's good to hear. And then just quickly for my follow-up, just with regards to the increase in the useful life of certain assets. Just to make sure our math is correct, the kind of the net impact to GM this quarter, was it about 20 to 30 basis points? And if you can maybe clarify the impact moving forward over the next few quarters, that would be great.

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

Thanks. No, that's right. Yes, about 30 basis points, I think, in 1Q. And then you could see it kind of bleeding into kind of the guidance into 2Q between 1 and 2 points.

You can think about maybe 150 basis points or so for 2Q and then another 1 to 2 points kind of bleeding into the back half of the year. And you've got to think about that in terms of kind of a revenue exit rate for the year of around $200 million or so, which I think we have a very good line of sight to.

Blake Friedman -- Bank of America Securities -- Analyst

Very helpful. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. The next question is from Pierre Ferragu with New Street. You may proceed.

Pierre Ferragu -- New Street Research -- Analyst

Hi. Thanks for taking my question. Can you hear me fine?

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes, we can. Thank you.

Pierre Ferragu -- New Street Research -- Analyst

OK. Great. I have a question about your 200-millimeter wafers. And I was wondering how you're approaching the question of making these wafers available to your substrate clients.

So how you're thinking about that? And then how far you are in the process? So, are you sharing -- have you already shipped some of these wafers to your clients, so they can start playing with them, look at whether they would like to add up the new size? Thanks.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes. So, thanks for the question. So, we're obviously focused on an internal ramp at this point with our new 200-millimeter factory coming online. So that's really where the focus is.

The results, as Neill had talked about of running these wafers through our pilot line, is actually very encouraging at this point. So, we feel real good about being able to ramp that. But it's really with the new factory coming online, we're really focused on getting that factory up and running.

Pierre Ferragu -- New Street Research -- Analyst

OK. And in that case, do you have a sense for what would be the earliest your competitors would -- on the device side would have a similar like 200-millimeter fab, what kind of lead time they would get based on like what you see from like a substrate perspective?

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Hard to tell. Obviously, we began construction of our 200-millimeter factory almost two years ago, so a year and a half, a year and three quarters ago. So, it does take a while to actually get a silicon carbide factory up and running.

There are some differences between silicon and silicon carbide in terms of the equipment that you need in the fab. And so, you have to kind of be thinking through that. So, I don't know exactly when that would be for everybody, but I know that for us, going from not having a factory to having a 200-millimeter factory, beginning to run qualification material, it's a two-year process. And that was started, of course, 18 months ago or so.

Before there were all these supply issues. So, I would imagine if you're trying to build a factory today of 200-millimeters, it probably would be a lot longer than two years would be my guess. 

Pierre Ferragu -- New Street Research -- Analyst

Thanks, Gregg.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

You're welcome.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question is from Gary Mobley with Wells Fargo. You may proceed.

Gary Mobley -- Wells Fargo Securities -- Analyst

Hey, guys, everybody. Thanks for taking the question. I wanted to ask about some of the supply constraints and the impact this has had on your unfilled backlog. If I'm not mistaken, last quarter, you identified roughly $100 million in revenue you were not able to fill, and I presume that was mostly on the RF side related to some of the bottlenecks out of Malaysia.

But now that we're sitting here late October, where does that unfilled backlog sit? And how would you characterize the trends in the -- or the gap between demand and supply overall?

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Gary, for the question. I think if you think about the amount that we've got and just took the revenue numbers up, obviously, in 2Q and the outlook for the rest of the year, as I said earlier, I think we've got pretty good line of sight to kind of exiting the year kind of at $200 million, maybe a little bit north of revenue there. So, I think we're making progress on driving more capacity through the system, whether that be in Malaysia or here in Durham. But the challenge we've got is that the demand keeps steepening.

So, I think if you look into this year and as you get into next year, we always talked about that transition point being '23 or '24. And that demand curve continues to steepen, and it's right upon us right now. So, I still think that even with that revenue increase, we still have north of $100 million of unfulfilled demand. And we're really just pushing as hard as we can, whether it be capex or driving organic throughput or bringing as much capacity online as we can to kind of close those gaps.

Now as you know, the big transition for us is getting to Mohawk Valley. So, the faster we can make that transition and move into Mohawk Valley we can, but we're looking at kind of any and all solutions to try and close that gap as fast as we can.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

And then, Gary, maybe just a couple of other additional points. We made some changes here in North Carolina in terms of -- brought in some leadership for the wafer fabs here. We're seeing some early signs of good progress there. Customers are super excited about that.

And then the additional thing that Neill mentioned with Mohawk Valley coming online, customers are obviously super excited about that. In fact, last quarter, we received our first official purchase order for products coming out of Mohawk Valley on 200-millimeter wafer. So, they're seeing that light at the end of the tunnel, and it was great to get that first purchase order in.

Gary Mobley -- Wells Fargo Securities -- Analyst

Great. Appreciate that. And so, my follow-up, I want to ask you, Gregg, about China. If I'm not mistaken, your expectations in terms of revenue contribution from China as part of your 2024 plan is only about 10% of that $1.5 billion revenue forecast.

And as you know, ROHM and San'an seem to have a strong hold on some of the Chinese EV OEMs. But I'm wondering if you have any change in your outlook as it relates to China for better or for worse as a contribution to Cree -- I'm sorry, Wolfspeed?

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. We haven't changed that at this point. And what I would say is the tensions -- the global tensions between -- especially between the U.S. and China, remain pretty high, I would say.

And there doesn't seem to be a sign, from my viewpoint, of anything abating. So, we just think it's just prudent to kind of dial that back a little bit. That being said, we've got a lot of activity in China and customers are evaluating products and design wins and so forth. But I think it's just prudent to dial that back just in light of the increased tensions.

Gary Mobley -- Wells Fargo Securities -- Analyst

Thank you, guys. Look forward to seeing you in a couple weeks.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Gary.

Operator

Thank you. The next question is from the line of Jed Dorsheimer with Canaccord Genuity. You may proceed.

Jed Dorsheimer -- Canaccord Genuity -- Analyst

Thanks. It's a tough one. So, guys, congratulations on a great quarter outlook. I guess first question, Gregg, maybe just shifting the conversation away from EVs, as it seems like that's the most of the lines of questioning, but there's many more applications beyond EV, solar inverters, grid-forming, grid-following inverters, wind turbines, just to name a few, I was wondering if you might be able to give an update in? And in the context of that, how has the assurance of supply, specifically in some of the nonautomotive, changed the conversations of how some of your partners are looking at you? And then I do have a follow-up.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Sure, Jed. Thanks for the question. As I mentioned in the prepared remarks, we've got the pipeline now at over $18 billion has over 8,200 projects in there. And of course, a lot of the value is automotive, but a lot of the number of projects are these other applications.

I talked about an industrial cooktop that we won, a wall charger, an elevator. So, you're exactly right, we're seeing a lot of momentum in the broader industrial markets. And customers are switching from silicon to silicon carbide across a number of different end equipments. Our partnership, obviously, with Arrow helps us reach those customers.

That continues to be a very strong relationship and strong partnership. And the momentum there is actually quite solid. So, I feel real good about that. And what I would tell you, Jed, in terms of the capacity coming online, those industrial customers are also paying attention to the fact that it was nearly two years -- well, it was two years ago, we made the decision to invest in a new fab, and then we broke ground in March of 2020.

And they see that we've made those investments well ahead of this demand coming online. And they are really appreciating that. And so, as they start looking into designing in silicon carbide, they're definitely paying attention to who made those investments almost two years ago and is now bringing on capacity. And we're looking pretty good from that perspective.

Jed Dorsheimer -- Canaccord Genuity -- Analyst

Awesome. Just as my follow-up, I'll just turn to Neill for a second. And just going back to a previous question, just by my math, if I kind of pull out some of the one-times from the margin adjustment, it looks like yields in the wafer facility picked up a few points. And Gregg mentioned not by name, but Rex Felton coming on, sort of some of the management changes.

And I'm just wondering whether or not -- well, one, is that in line with what you saw? And so, I'm assuming then that we've just kind of seen a bottom in margin as yields seem like they're moving up down in Durham?

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

That's right, Jed. I think we've seen the bottom and we're starting to turn up the other way on margin. And I think there's several components to that. One is we did have a bit of a drag with this kind of Malaysia subcontractor issue, the COVID-19 outbreak, and we've been recovering from that.

So, I think we've put that behind us. And the second thing is, and Gregg mentioned earlier, that we've seen some benefits just from some of the new staff and the management changes that we made. We are seeing good early returns on that but will take a little bit of time for that to work itself through inventory and see itself kind of into the results. So, as you move forward, I think we're going to see margin expansion both in the device and the materials businesses.

But the one thing to be aware of is that the power device business is just going to grow faster, and we're just seeing that order flow right now. It's off that, regardless of the improvement there, that's going to be kind of a negative mix for us, right, just based on the North Carolina footprint. So, I think what you'll see is margin expansion in terms of the fundamentals of the business. And then we'll see a little bit of that kind of maybe held back a little bit just by the overall mix on device.

And then as we've talked about many times, once we ship that over to Mohawk Valley, that's really the solution. But I do think we'll see some strong margin improvement here as we move forward.

Jed Dorsheimer -- Canaccord Genuity -- Analyst

Great. Thanks, guys.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Jed.

Operator

Thank you. The next call is from Brian Lee with Goldman Sachs. You may proceed.

Brian Lee -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Hey, guys, thanks for taking the questions. I guess first one, just talking about the scale and the capacity given, it sounds like the demand environment is getting better and there's potentially upside. Can you give us some thoughts around adding more raw materials capacity, whether it be on timing, location, maybe anything on potential scale versus what you have today in Durham? And then also maybe related to that, how much it would cost? And Neill, you alluded to being open about accessing capital markets. Sort of how that would all fit into the strategy here going forward? And then I had a follow-up.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Thanks, Brian. So, we are doing that capacity expansion for the materials business kind of as we speak. It's been something that we've actually been doing now for the last year and a half or so inside of our current materials building.

We've now gone across the street to a different building and are expanding that. If you happen to come on our campus these days, you'll see a lot of construction and fences up and things like that. And that's all the transitioning of that old lighting facility and actually what used to be a basketball court to a materials production operation. That's going very well.

We're super excited about that. And that expands our capacity here on campus, but to a different facility. So that's something that's been ongoing for the last couple of years in the existing building and now is going on in a building across the street from us.

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

Yes. And then, Brian, just to your second point there, obviously, we've been working on this capital expansion for a couple of years now, two, three years. And we put a substantial amount of capex to work for us to essentially triple the business over the next -- from last year out to 2024. So, ramping beyond what we've had -- what we've done already is already kind of a challenge.

So, I think as I've talked about many times, it really becomes a supply side challenge, and we're trying to manage that and push it as fast and as hard as we can. As it relates to funding it, I mean, there are several different funding ways that we've been managing this. One of them that we haven't seen a lot of yet, but it's really starting to kick in is the reimbursements from New York from Mohawk Valley. So, from a capex standpoint, we're going to spend $475 million or so this year, and that's going to step down in the back half of the year as you see more of those reimbursements coming in.

So, as you look out into the -- over that time frame, obviously, we'll be opportunistic just around can we look for opportunities to increase the revenue between now and that time. But still, I would say it's a supply side challenge thing, and we're somewhat limited in the options that we have, although we're looking for solutions always within the four walls that we have right now to kind of go manage that. And again, if that required being opportunistic, something I would look at. But right now, I think we're in pretty good shape from a cash and liquidity standpoint to kind of manage where we're at.

But again, we'll be opportunistic looking forward.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

And just a real quick addition on that. Obviously, anything from a supply perspective near term before we get Mohawk Valley would be out of our Durham wafer fabs. And that's where we brought in some new leadership. You mentioned Rex, but also Missy Stigall has come in last quarter and it's already making an impact, a pretty strong and positive impact in terms of how the fab operates.

We still have ways to go, but we're seeing really good early indications of some good progress that she is going to make.

Brian Lee -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

OK. I appreciate that context. Just second one from me, on the VW framework agreement, I mean, I think this is one of your original sort of points on the board, if you will, a couple of years back. I know you've talked about customer developments accelerating of late, especially on the automotive side.

And then you've had some nice Tier 1 wins like GM here recently. So just wondering, can you update us a bit on kind of what's the latest at VW, where you are in terms of any stage of commercialization and a revenue opportunity there? Thanks, guys.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Nothing specifically to announce on any additional customers. We obviously were able to announce the GM deal through a joint press release. So, we win business, and sometimes, we're able to announce specifics about it and sometimes we're not. So, at this point, we don't have anything to announce on that.

What I would tell you is we've had a number of automotive OEMs and a number of Tier 1s that have come visited us over the last -- well, we visit with them a lot. But over the last quarter, we had a number have come visit with us here in North Carolina and also go visit the wafer fab in Mohawk Valley, and they leave quite impressed and quite satisfied with what we're doing. As many of you know, I've been in Europe multiple times, even during COVID, visiting with customers, doing my five-day quarantine to start that off, but then visiting with customers. And that's kept the level of engagement quite high.

Both Neill and I were in Europe a couple of months ago. We're actually going back in the first week of -- first two weeks of December for more customer visits. And of course, the week before October 4th, I was in Detroit, visiting with folks, including General Motors, and preparing for that announcement. So, we've stayed high on the engagement list in terms of engaging with customers, both virtually and live with them.

And we're feeling really good about the development of the relationships we have. They see the fact that two years ago, we made the decision to increase output in March of 2020. We started moving dirt in Mohawk Valley. And they see that in a matter of a couple of months here, we're going to be running production -- well, qualification runs in the first half of 2022, calendar 2022.

And then getting our first customer purchase order for specifically for Mohawk Valley 200-millimeter equipment is really encouraging. So, all of that is tied up pretty nicely. I think that's helped us win the business at -- the $560 million that we discussed this last quarter, the $2.9 billion that we've got in fiscal '21. That's all really positive.

And it's also helped us increase the pipeline. And that device pipeline doubling in the last two years -- technically, it's more than doubled because the $9 billion that we referenced at our last Investor Day had LED in it, and obviously, it doesn't anymore. So, we're just feeling like there's a really nice transition happening with silicon carbide in the industry. And the fact that we were pretty far ahead of anybody in terms of expanding capacity is proving to be a very positive thing for us. 

Brian Lee -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Thanks, guys.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Brian.

Operator

Thank you. The next question is from Ed Snyder with Charter Equity Research. You may proceed.

Ed Snyder -- Charter Equity Research -- Analyst

Thank you very much. First off, if I could, Gregg, looking at all the math, you go through all the details of where you are in both the device fab in North Carolina and the materials business and your plans for Mohawk Valley. It's hard to escape the reality that Mohawk won't be up and running in material revenue really until probably early 2023. I know you're going to ramp.

I know the plans for ramping. But in terms of really starting to impact the top line, it doesn't show up until probably '23. And that gives you about maybe 18 months to hit your financial targets. So, I just want to check some reality.

You're going to need to be growing revenue at least, at least 50% year on year every quarter and maybe even as high as 100% in the early stages in order to get there. And at the same time, isn't it also the case that the device business or the device fab in North Carolina is going to have to get their margins at least in the high 30s, probably even low 40s into fiscal year '24 to hit the targets you have laid out here? Does that ballpark makes sense to you?

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

Well, our target remains $1.5 billion in 2024. And as we mentioned in the prepared remarks, we're feeling pretty good about that. The steepening of the demand curve is certainly there. The demand isn't, I would say, an issue at all relative to that target.

We're feeling very, very good about that. We have obviously a lot of effort in terms of getting Mohawk Valley going. And just recall, as part of the deal in New York, we got a pilot line. That pilot line was converted to 200-millimeter silicon carbide a long time ago, maybe a year ago or something like that.

So, we've been running 200-millimeter wafers through that pilot line for quite some time. We're seeing the initial MOSFETs and Schottkys out there. The yields are looking pretty good. So, we feel like when we get the fab up and running, it's going to be in -- it will kind of have a running start, so to speak.

I think from a North Carolina perspective, we made the change with Missy joining the team. She has made a tremendous amount of progress in a very, very short amount of time in terms of changing how the factory operates, the metrics that they're looking at, and so forth. And initial indications are really positive. And so, we've got good hope for some continued very strong progress out of that factory as we're ramping Mohawk Valley.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Let me just add to that, Ed. I think if you look at the North Carolina fab, while the cost footprint is higher, we've also transitioned the fab, and I've talked about it before, we need to stabilize it. We put over 100 tools into it over the last year or so. And we haven't really seen all the benefits of that.

So, I think we'll get better -- more improvement out of North Carolina as we move through the remainder of the year. The difference is just that we're talking about a different diameter and a bigger scale factory in Mohawk Valley. But I think that Durham still plays a very important role for us and the improvement that we can see out of it between now and that time frame you're talking about.

Ed Snyder -- Charter Equity Research -- Analyst

Great. Thanks. If I could follow up with you, Neill. I mean, you mentioned again this quarter, you'd get 50% lower wafer cost in Mohawk Valley than in Durham, and that didn't include the full benefit of 200-millimeter.

But you also said 50% lower cycle time and 20 to 30 points better yield. The 50% lower wafer cost has caused quite a bit of confusion, not just among us, but some of your larger investors. And we spent quite a bit of time in the quarter going through it and with IR. And really, you are the guy we've been trying to get a hold of in order to explain the specifics of that.

So, if I could just set the stage on the debate that's been raging all order is, if the 50% faster cycle time already captures the amortization of fixed cost across your wafers than you currently capture that in the 50% cycle time and its 20 to 30 percent point yield improvement captures the lower breakage and better process control that you're going to get in this automated fab, where does the 50% lower wafer cost come from? In talking to Tyler through the quarter, he was maintaining -- didn't include any of this 150 millimeter versus 150-millimeter. But your comments seem to suggest there's something with 200-millimeter. And so maybe you could explain for us finally what goes into that 50%? Is it 200-millimeter? Is it something we're missing? Or is it captured in some of the other metrics? Thanks.

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

No. The cycle time obviously is part of the wafer processing cost, but there's a lot more cost in the model, obviously, than just the wafer processing cost, OK? So, if you think about it going from 150 to 200, normally, wafer processing costs would go up just by the nature of it. In this case, we're saying, just on a nominal basis, it's going down. And if you take into account the 200-millimeter benefit, it's well above 50%, significantly above 50%.

So, I think more than 50% is a fair way to talk about it in that sense. And then, of course, then you have to add the yield benefit on top of that, right? So, the number of good die that we're getting off every wafer is 20 to 30 points higher. So just from a pure cost-benefit standpoint, if you go down at the die level, that's well over 50% when you start putting those two things together. So, I think greater than 50%, I think, is a reasonable way to talk about at this point.

And I think you've got line of sight, obviously, to even better numbers than that in terms of the die level.

Ed Snyder -- Charter Equity Research -- Analyst

So, the 50% lower wafer cost does capture, to a large extent, the large amount of breakage that you have on 150-millimeter at Durham and how that won't occur in Mohawk Valley. That's where a lot of it comes from. So even with a bigger wafer, you're still getting better wafer costs on it?

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

That's right. The processing cost of 200 is better than 150, which -- that doesn't take into account the change, right? So, there's an improvement right there. And then you get the benefit of going to 150 to 200 on top of that. Not only do you get the bigger wafer with more die on it, you get the yield -- the yield of that die is better, so you get a better cost.

Ed Snyder -- Charter Equity Research -- Analyst

Great. Thank you.

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Ed.

Operator

Thank you. Your next question is from Craig Irwin with ROTH Capital Markets. You may proceed.

Craig Irwin -- ROTH Capital Partners -- Analyst

Good evening, and thanks for taking my questions. So, Gregg, I was hoping you could help us understand the composition of the $560 million in awards in the quarter. Can you maybe talk a little bit about how much of that is automotive versus distribution? And how much of that is likely to turn as revenue within the next, let's say, maybe 12 months versus being a contribution to demand in the '24 or '24-plus time frame?

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Craig. So let me hit the second question first. So, a very small percentage of any of that $560 million will turn into revenue in the next 12 months. And industrial applications are -- definitely have a longer gestation period from design-in to revenue ramp.

And so, it'll be -- maybe some, but it'll be relatively small. And so not much is what I'm saying. There's not a whole lot of sort of consumer applications. Industrial is definitely a couple of years.

Automotive typically is four or five years, so a little bit longer period. And then in terms of the design-ins, I don't have the exact numbers, but I recall it to be about half is automotive for the $560 million. And then of the rest, we've got some nice RF design wins that we've gotten or design-ins that we've gotten and then a very strong industrial play. And I mentioned a couple of these industrial cooktop and induction cooktop, a wall charger, elevator and elevator application, things that we wouldn't normally be able to cover.

But with the partnership we've had with Arrow now for a couple of years, we're able to reach those customers as well.

Craig Irwin -- ROTH Capital Partners -- Analyst

Great. Now that actually bridges very well to my second question. Yes, you've had an excellent relationship with Arrow and your distribution partners over the last many, many years. And it's helped you cost-effectively serve emerging customers, emerging applications.

The EV charging application, I would not call that emerging. There's a super customer out there in charging, a real pioneer that you've served from day 1. And most of the hardware guys we talk to either have silicon carbide in their designs or coming into their next-generation designs. But when we talk to them, a lot of them really are buying through distribution.

Do you expect this to play a major role in how the maturation of these relationships occurs? And has there been sort of a process of companies getting to a certain size and then maybe being shared with distribution or moving over to direct purchases? How does this possibly evolve for you?

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

I think we have a distribution strategy that's playing very well for us, and I don't see any change of that strategy. I think we've got a really strong partnership. And I think that plays very well for the strengths that Arrow brings to the party in terms of the channel and the strengths that we bring in terms of product breadth and so forth. So, I don't see that changing.

Some companies have changed their model to more of a -- they do their own demand creation across these thousands of customers. But Craig, our footprint is just so small, it just wouldn't be viable for us. We had an opportunity to have one of our sales folks in Europe actually present to our board of directors about an opportunity that she won with a customer in Spain. And they did that through Arrow.

And Arrow had -- Arrow's footprint in Spain, I believe, is larger than our footprint in Europe. And we have zero employees in Spain. So, it's just -- in fact, we don't have anybody to the left of France. And I think there's only one person in France.

So, our footprint is really, really quite small. So, I think we've got a great strategy. We're sticking with it. And I think we're going to have this partnership for quite some time.

Craig Irwin -- ROTH Capital Partners -- Analyst

Well, congratulations on the strong quarter. Thank you.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Craig.

Operator

The next question is from Samik Chatterjee with J.P. Morgan. You may proceed.

Samik Chatterjee -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

Thanks for taking my question. I guess just to start off with one on competition that I've been getting from a few investors. That's in relation to ON Semiconductor and their purchase of GTAT, a silicon carbide provider. And just wanted to get your thoughts on how that changes the competitive landscape? And where do you really see them in the -- in terms of capabilities? And if you can just share your thoughts on -- that will be helpful.

And I have a follow-up. Thank you.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Sure. So, silicon carbide is obviously a super attractive space right now, and there's a lot of companies that are getting into this space. We are the largest provider of silicon carbide wafer materials to the customer base. And we have long-term agreements with many different customers in this space.

And basically, all of our long-term agreements -- well, the vast majority of the long-term agreements that we have are with customers that also have some kind of internal capability or an internal desire or capability -- desire to have an internal capability. And that's true with the vast majority of our long-term suppliers and I -- or customers. And I think it -- strategically, it probably makes sense for them to try to do that. I think what this business of silicon carbide materials tends to be a lot harder than a lot of people think.

And so, what we're finding typically happens is -- we've had a couple of instances already where we have a long-term agreement with a customer, and then they extend it and expand it and extend it and expand it again. And as they see their -- the internal effort just really is difficult. I don't think that changes at all. I think if I were them, I would do the same thing, and I think their strategy makes sense.

But I think it's -- this growing of silicon carbide is not for the faint of heart. There's lots of tricky things associated with the technology. We spent 30 years doing only this. And I think we've grown the scale pretty nicely.

Samik Chatterjee -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

OK. And a quick follow-up with Neill here. Neill, you mentioned some revenue push out on the RF side because of the slower ramp on the contract manufacturer there. I didn't hear anything if you -- I don't know if you've mentioned it, but can you quantify the amount of revenue that's getting pushed out, in your estimate, because of that slower ramp?

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

It was in 1Q. You think of it as just like a few million bucks, not a huge amount. However, I think we've caught that back up. And I think in the estimate that we're looking at, we're seeing some forward progress on RF kind of in line what we thought previously.

So that kind of gets caught back up, I think, in the new estimate we've given.

Samik Chatterjee -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

Thank you.

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

Sure.

Operator

OK. The next question is from Karl Ackerman with Cowen. You may proceed.

Unknown speaker

Good afternoon. This is [Inaudible] for Karl Ackerman. Can you hear me OK?

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Actually, no, it sounds very scrambled. There may be something with your Bluetooth.

Unknown speaker

Is this better?

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes, that's way better. Thank you.

Unknown speaker

OK. Great. I have two questions, please, the first one going back to the GM contract. You mentioned some of the [Inaudible] EV cars that it will be put into.

Could you provide a few more comments on the number of platforms or product design? And then as a follow-up to that, given the increasing amount of design-ins that you've been awarded, including GM, would you expect to more rapidly build out plant capacity at Mohawk?

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you for the question. And we can't give any more detail on the GM announcement other than what was out in the press. So, I apologize for that. We're excited about it.

It is across a number of different vehicles, and it's a really solid announcement for us. In terms of the ramp-up of capacity, maybe I'll let Neill talk to a little bit more. Obviously, we're seeing a steepening of the demand right now, and we are working really hard to satisfy that demand. It's basically a pull-in and a steeper ramp than we originally had anticipated, and quite frankly, I think originally than anyone has anticipated with the demand growing very, very rapidly for not only electric vehicles but for silicon carbide solutions and EVs and across the industrial market.

So maybe, Neill, if you want to give a little bit more color on that.

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. Then in terms of like we think we can do in terms of bringing on capacity faster, one thing we've got to remember, and I said it earlier, is we're going to triple the business here just over a few-year period. And if you think about bringing up new factories purely like Mohawk Valley, which is a brand new fab, just want to be really careful in terms of the time frame in which you bring those tools up and start to expand capacity. So, between now and 2024, we feel like the plan we've got is the right one and balances the risks in terms of bringing up a new fab, obviously, at a new diameter.

But clearly, as we look out beyond that, there is space in Mohawk Valley. Just a little bit over 50% of the cleanroom kind of is utilized out in that 2024 time frame. And obviously, we would look to fill in the rest of that capacity beyond that. In the meantime, I think, as we talked about earlier, we've really got to look for ways to solution the capacity constraints within the four walls that we already have, and that's really where we're focused right now.

Unknown speaker

Got it. And my second question, could you discuss some of the opportunities that you see to pass along pricing or mitigate input or freight cost increases that we've seen across the industry, especially with your expanded relationship with Arrow?

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes. So, I would say there's minimal impact here, and we're in the very early phase of a pretty massive ramp. Most of our design wins we have, either even with the LTA agreements that we have in place and so forth, our longer-term pricing agreements. So, I'd say a minimal impact there.

Unknown speaker

Great. Thank you, and congrats again.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. The next question is from Ambrish Srivastava with BMO. You may proceed.

Ambrish Srivastava -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

Thank you. Neill, I had a clarification on the depreciation impact, the positive impact from longer depreciation. Is that going to flow through for the next two quarters and beyond as well? And then I had another clarification, please.

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

Yes, Ambrish, let me just reiterate so that we can be as clear as we can on that. So Q1, roughly 30 basis points, an incremental 1 to 2 points as you get into 2Q, so think about 150 basis points, and then an additional 1 to 2 points that will bleed into the back half of the year.

Ambrish Srivastava -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

Got it. Got it. Thank you. And then I just wanted to come back to the capex and the capacity.

Just wanted to make sure I understood. In the Durham fab, you're adding capacity as well, right? But the $475 million capex is primarily for Mohawk, and there's additional for Durham? Or that's the total that you will be spending? It wasn't very clear to me.

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

It's $475 million in total. A big piece of that is the final kind of, I'll call them, outlays for Mohawk Valley. So, remember, we outlay and then we get reimbursements. We've seen about $60 million or so of reimbursement of the $500 million so far.

In Durham, just remember, there are two pieces to this. There's the materials factory expansion and then there's a Durham fab. In the Durham fab, we've largely completed that execution in terms of bringing up the factory from a MOSFET standpoint. And the investment we're making now that's showing up for the remainder of the year is really around the materials expansion for 200-millimeter in the facility that Gregg mentioned earlier.

Ambrish Srivastava -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

Got it. Got it. So, by 2024, Durham would have -- what percent of capacity would be Mohawk Valley versus Durham? And did I hear you say correctly that you would have 50% additional cleanroom space by then to hit the $1.5 billion? You feel you have sufficient capacity. But then beyond that, you have 50% additional cleanroom capacity, correct?

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

Yes. I think it's a little more than 50%, I think, Ambrish, we'll have filled out. And we'll have a little less in that for the remainder of the fab in Mohawk Valley. So, there is a period beyond, and we could fill in more tools into the cleanroom in Mohawk Valley.

And then in Durham, we'll continue to try and drive as much capacity as we can through. We'd expect a little north of 70% of the device revenue, the total device revenue coming out of Mohawk Valley as you get out to that 2024 time frame.

Ambrish Srivastava -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

Got it. Got it. And material?

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

All materials will be -- is fully out of Durham. So, we have materials capacity that we have today. And then we are building a new -- we're setting on a new facility here on campus, as we talked about in the prepared remarks, that will support essentially 200-millimeter. So, when we're done, what we'll have is a 150-millimeter small amount of that fab work will be done here in Durham.

But materials will be driven through 150-millimeter that we've got today, but a much larger expansion on 200-millimeter. So, we'll have a pretty significantly sized 200-millimeter supply chain through materials in Durham and then fabbing through Mohawk Valley.

Ambrish Srivastava -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

Got it. Thank you very much. Appreciate the color.

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Mr. Srivastava.

Operator

Thank you. The next question comes from the line of Colin Rusch with Oppenheimer. You may proceed.

Colin Rusch -- Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. -- Analyst

Thanks so much for sneaking us in here, guys. Can you just give us a sense of the mix in that device opportunity number? How much of that is 400-volt devices? And how much of that is 800-volt plus within that $18 million number that you're talking about?

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes. So, from an automotive perspective, what you're really talking about there, I believe, is the voltage for the car manufacturers bus, it's either a 400-volt bus or at 800-volt bus. And then our devices are actually higher than that to support those kinds of levels of devices. They can be 750 volt or 1,200 volt or a variant thereof.

What I would say is we are winning a business both at 400 and 800 volts. And I would say that a lot of our customers are moving and transitioning from a 400-volt bus to an 800-volt bus for automotive applications. And that's primarily because they get better efficiency, and they get way better charging capability as well. So, there's this kind of a transition going on.

But we've got wins in both those areas.

Colin Rusch -- Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. -- Analyst

Great. And then just in terms of the qualification process, you guys gave us some detail on just starting to work with the tools. But in terms of full automotive-grade qualification on the factory, how far along are you guys with that? And how is that progressing here? Now when can we think about you guys really shipping the material out of Mohawk Valley that's been fully qualified for the customers?

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes. So, we will begin qualification -- our internal qualification will be in the first half of the year. And when we do that internal qualification, that will pass the automotive qualification requirements. So, we'll be doing those internal qualifications to the automotive customers' requirements.

And then in the back half of the year, the customers will do their own qualification. And that's where they take qualified devices and put them into their inverters or their equipment and run whatever test that they need to do on that. So that's kind of the process that we'll go through.

Colin Rusch -- Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. -- Analyst

Perfect. Thanks so much, guys.

Operator

Thank you. I will now pass the call back over to Gregg Lowe with Wolfspeed for closing remarks. You may proceed, Mr. Lowe.

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Well, thanks a lot, everybody, for taking the time to visit with us today. And we look forward to continuing to work with you on November 17 at our Investor Day in New York. Thank you very much, and have a good evening.

Operator

[Operator signoff]

Duration: 67 minutes

Call participants:

Tyler Gronbach -- Vice President of Investor Relations

Gregg Lowe -- Chief Executive Officer

Neill Reynolds -- Chief Financial Officer

Blake Friedman -- Bank of America Securities -- Analyst

Pierre Ferragu -- New Street Research -- Analyst

Gary Mobley -- Wells Fargo Securities -- Analyst

Jed Dorsheimer -- Canaccord Genuity -- Analyst

Brian Lee -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Ed Snyder -- Charter Equity Research -- Analyst

Craig Irwin -- ROTH Capital Partners -- Analyst

Samik Chatterjee -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

Unknown speaker

Ambrish Srivastava -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

Colin Rusch -- Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. -- Analyst

All earnings call transcripts

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