Mark Mahorney

Mark Mahorney

mark-mahorney

Recent articles

Tyco Tries to Move On

Investors give this scandal-plagued company a second chance.


StorageTek's Holding Pattern

StorageTek anxiously awaits the great tech spending revival.


Corning Comes Through

LCD glass demand drives revenue up for the company.


Has the Exchange Rate Peaked for IBM?

The balance of currency rates and the economy signals a prime time to invest for the long term.


CNET Broadens Again

If you download it or upload it, CNET's on it.

GE's Optimistic Catalyst

The CEO says this is the best economy in years, and the market takes a cue.


International Speedway Speeds Ahead

Lap by lap, this motorsports operator keeps growing its business.


The Flexible Flextronics

Flextronics International is the leader in high-volume, low-margin, profitable discount manufacturing.


Economics of Offshoring

A study provides a clearer picture of what offshoring means to financial companies.


ATI: Right Tech, Right Time

ATI Technologies' move into cell phones and digital TVs brings big bucks.

The 3Com Shuffle

The company cuts its Q4 losses and expenses and tries to hang on.


The Economy vs. Rates Debate

Goldman's got the numbers, but what about interest rates?


Adobe Anomaly

Today's selling of Adobe was unjustifiable given the company's prospects.


One Wiley Publisher

Big-box retailers and online offerings aren't the only place to put your money in the book business.


IT Spending Heats Up

CIOs are planning to spend more on new technologies going forward, which will benefit the outsourcing companies.

Beware of Brand Bias

Is brand bias steering you toward the wrong investments and away from the right ones?


Music Download Firms Don't Get It

A less-than-pleasant downloading experience indicates companies have a long way to go.


Breast Enhancer Bounces Back

Dow Corning emerges from bankruptcy. Now what?


Accenture Signs Security Deal

Can Accenture turn opportunity into profit?


A Case for Buying Foreign Goods

The flat-panel display market is a convoluted case of how buying more foreign goods is actually good for the U.S.