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PDF Solutions (NASDAQ:PDFS)
Q2 2019 Earnings Call
Aug 01, 2019, 5:00 p.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:


Operator

Good day, ladies and gentlemen, and welcome to the PDF Solutions, Inc., conference call to discuss its financial results for the second quarter ended Sunday, June 30th, 2019. [Operator instructions] As a reminder, this conference is being recorded. If you have not yet received a copy of the corresponding press release it has been posted to PDF's website at www.pdf.com. Some of the statements that will be made in the course of this conference are forward-looking, including statements regarding PDF's future financial results and performance, growth rates, and demands for its solutions.

PDF's actual results could differ materially. You should refer to the section entitled Risk Factors on Pages 12 through 21 of PDF's annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31st, 2018, and similar disclosures in subsequent SEC filings. The forward-looking statements and risks stated in this conference call are based on information available to PDF today. PDF assumes no obligation to update them.

Now I'd like to turn the call over to John Kibarian, PDF's president and chief executive officer; and Christine Russell, PDF's chief financial officer. Mr. Kibarian, please go ahead.

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, and welcome, everyone. If you have not already seen our earnings press release and management report presentation for the second quarter, please go to the investors section of our website where each has been posted. Although our total revenues were up only slightly, our results this quarter showed the progress toward our objective, to be the provider of choice for end-to-end analytics and manufacturing control to the semiconductor electronics industry. Our results reveal the ongoing evolution from being important to our customers in ramping leading-edge logic notes to be even more valuable for controlling quality, reliability, yield, and operational effectiveness across the lifetime of semiconductor production.

This is leading to a growing customer base. In the past our focus on ramping leading-edge logic, resulted in only a handful of customers driving the majority of our revenues. This caused our business to be tied closely to the investments that go on leading-edge logic. Our business is now driven by analytics.

We have over 130 customers that make everything from leading-edge logic to high voltage discrete, make signal, memory, and systems. The emphasis on analytics has grown our available market and will create more predictable results for PDF. We characterize the value we bring to the industry as foresight. That is the ability to monitor what is happening in production and convert this into useful information for predicting and preventing publication problems.

We are uniquely able to do this because our measurement tools, databases, and analytics software spend the whole supply chain from wafer manufacturers to foundries, OSATs, IDMs, and fabless to systems.

Let me touch on four highlights from the second quarter that demonstrate our continued progress. The first highlight is the extensive number of cloud machine learning pilots we are doing. Over 25% of our top 20 customers are engaged with us on paid pilots to evaluate either our Exensio on the cloud, our AI-based solutions or both. These projects generate smaller revenue, but upon successful completion could lead to annual revenue rate that are multiples larger than our annual revenue run rate at these accounts today.

The value of the cloud and AI are clear. In particular, customers are evaluating Exensio in the cloud are able to see five to 30 times better performance versus using Exensio on premise with conventional rate relational databases. A number of our customers, including mixed signal and some of the largest deltas companies tell us, their Exensio database is the largest database within their company. Those types of customers see the most substantial performance benefits from Exensio on the cloud.

We believe that in the second half a substantial number of these pilots will expand in department. This greatly increases the value we can offer these customers, of course, lead to a much higher annual run rates or revenue. The second highlight is DFI, where we continue to drive momentum and customer demos that should lead to future growth. As we mentioned on the April call, in Q2 our goal was to get released to manufacturing.

The eProbe 250 achieved that milestone in second quarter adding the lead customer. This means that in the third quarter, these customers command production wafers at volume. Developed use cases for the unique DFI data can provide and increase effectiveness of their development in manufacturing. Beyond this lead foundry customer, DFI is being demoed at leading-edge logic manufacturers.

We -- If we see successful positive technical results, then in the next few quarters we anticipate resulting programs at these companies, similar in scope to our first account. We're also kicking off our first demonstration on the leading-edge memory manufacturer. All this activity increases our confidence in the outlook for DFI. We are now ordering long lead parts to build more eProbe 250 in the near future.

Our third highlight is the opportunity that Exensio can afford in end-to-end analytics. In the past, customers use different systems for yield management, process control, assembly control, and test analytics. Accenture is the first system that sells all these applications in a single flow. Just like design automation companies help insist chip industry move from using point tools to integrate design flow.

Exensio is helping our customers realize the full potential of end-to-end analytics. This value of our core functionality is visible in the strong growth of our analytics revenue. Analytics revenue, which includes Exensio and DFI, grew to over 70% of our solutions revenue this quarter. Analytics revenue was up over 40% from the same period last year, and well over 10% sequentially.

The key growth driver for analytics revenue is expanding the footprint of Exensio at our large customer base. For example, one mix signal customer using only our new management module, completed a pilot of our test module. If they adopted our annual revenue run rate then it will double. There are over 130 existing customers today.

None of them are using a full set of applications. We're excited about the many opportunities we have to expand within our existing customer base. This brings us to our fourth highlight, bookings. The new bookings in the quarter came from foundries, IBM, fabless, and one of the world's largest consumer electronics companies.

We are seeing an interest in Exensio from electronics companies, as they develop their own chips, and Silicon becomes a more important part of their business. I do want to mention that the second-quarter revenue was reduced by a deferral of over $1 million from a 14-nanometer yield ramp customer. This particular customer is very delinquent on payments on this development program, which we have discussed in the past. While they insist they will honor the contract and requesting additional solutions for their next note, they're also asking for financial concessions that we are not required to provide.

As the quarter went on, we made little progress in the negotiations for cost payments. As a result, we suspended discussions of future project for the next note, stopped all work, and stopped recognizing any additional value on this contract until this payment delinquency is resolved. We are confident on contractual rates and the standard of the work we delivered. We believe we will eventually collect the past due, as well as, the future revenues to which we are entitled.

Although we cannot predict how long that will take. The situation has created pain in the current period, but we believe it is the right approach to ultimately protect the interest of our other customers, and our stockholders. As we move to the remainder of 2019, we are increasingly confident in the effectiveness of our strategy. Most importantly, we expect increased customer adoption of our Exensio analytics software, characterization in vehicles in DFI.

We believe that the pilot programs of our top customers will be solid bookings in the second half of 2019. These bookings should demonstrate that customers value the integration of our characterization vehicles and end-to-end analytics that are possible with Exensio. Customer feedback, clearly reflects a high level of interest in utilizing our capabilities through our cloud model, which further enhances our opportunities. We believe the years of working, involving our business model are coming to fruition, based on the high level of activity in our marketing and sales pipeline.

We look forward to discussing our strategy and outlook, in more detail at our upcoming Analyst Day, held in conjunction with our annual users conference in San Jose. Please markets all for October 15th. We will be sending out more details soon on that event. Let me turn the call over to Christine to review the financials.

Christine?

Christine Russell -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, John. Look and you will have seen our financials, and our earnings release. In addition, we posted a management report in the investor relations section of our website. The report has financials and comments regarding the results of PDF for the quarter.

So I'll focus my comments on a few key areas. All of the financial results that we provide on this call are on a non-GAAP basis, which excludes stock based compensation amortization of intangibles and one-time restructuring charges. Please refer to our press release for our GAAP results and GAAP to non-GAAP reconciliation. Before I go through our analysis of our line items, I want to summarize what we consider to be key numbers for this quarter.

We want to ensure that important underlying trends are clear. To us, the key takeaways in our financial results are these. First, how our cash balance declined during the quarter. We generated the operating cash of 5.1 million, and the major use was the stock buyback of $3.8 million.

Equally important, we held cash constant before the repurchase of still funding on capex investments, which included the Stream Mosaic acquisition, and the continuing work on our eProbe 250. The second key takeaway, is that we are primarily a software analytic business now. Analytics revenue grew by over 10% sequentially, continuing a trend of steady growth. As John mentioned, analytics was over 70% of our solutions revenue.

With that summary, let's now look at the key items of the financial statements in more detail starting with revenue. Second-quarter revenue of $20.6 million was up slightly sequentially. In general, revenue behaved as we anticipated, as our model continued to evolve toward analytics. Analytics revenue comprised of Exensio software and DFI quarter over quarter.

Our efforts revolve around driving the growth analytics. So this revenue performance is gratifying. IYR, our classic business, continues to trend down. Gain share benefited from higher shipment volumes.

With analytics now generating the majority of solutions revenue, we're demonstrating the building momentum in our shift of revenue to higher margin subscription software, that can be deployed to a broader market than our traditional foundry customer base. During Q2, in addition to licensing Exensio to two foundries, we licensed Exensio to a large consumer electronics company, and three fabulous companies. Now let's turn the cost of sales and gross margin. Non-cash cost to sales was $6.9 million flat from the prior quarter leading to a stable gross margin of 67%.

The key driver was a continued shift in software subscriptions, which are higher margin. Similar to my comments on revenue, gross margin is behaving as planned. So we are pleased with those results. And as I mentioned earlier, I want to note that gains share revenue, which is 100% gross margin was $3 million higher sequentially.

However, we also have the absence of the seven-nanometer project kept revenue in Q1, which we discussed in our Q1 call. That revenue was of similar magnitude as the incremental gain share, and is also a 100% margin. So these two factors really offset each other. As we continue to build the revenue contribution from software subscription sales, we expect gross margin to further expand.

Ultimately, we expect it to be comparable to other software companies, which are typically in the 70% to 80% range. Now, let's look at operating expenses, which we held flat sequentially at $12.6 million. This reflects our disciplined approach to spending. we continue to add resources judiciously in sales and marketing, while looking for other opportunities to eliminate unnecessary expenses.

So turning to the bottom line, we posted non-GAAP net profit of $1 million, up 25% from the prior quarter. Non-GAAP earnings per share in the quarter, was $0.03. Shares outstanding for Q2 were $32.3 million, which reflects our share repurchase of 300,000 shares. Now we'll turn our attention to the balance sheet.

Cash at the end of Q2 was $86.8 million, a reduction of $3.6 million. As I noted earlier, the reduction was discretionary as it reflects our share repurchase. We generated over $5 million in cash from operations and funded the acquisition of three Mosaic and continuation of the DFI eProbe 250's bill. John mentioned the collection issue we have with one large customer.

As he discussed, we're confident in our contractual rights and the standard of work delivered. We believe we will eventually collect the past few receivables, as well as, future revenues to which we are entitled. We can't predict how long this may take. We've decided to stop work and deferred to Q2 revenue generated by this customer.

This result is in lower Q2 revenue for us. Looking at DSO after removing the impact of this contract, DSO would have been 135 days. Other than this one customer, we have not experienced any significant collection problems. We do expect DSO to improve when we resolve some transitory administrative issues with two other customers.

That should eventually reduce DSO by another 30 days. We'll now turn the call over to the operator for any questions. Operator?

Questions & Answers:


Operator

Thank you, Ms. Russell. [Operator instructions] Our first question comes from the line of Jon Tanwanteng from CJS Securities.

Jon Tanwanteng -- CJS Securities -- Analyst

Hey, good afternoon, guys. Thank you for taking my questions. Maybe can you first provide an update on the growth rate of Exensio software, maybe on a year-over-year basis? And secondly, maybe an update on the expectations for the amount of Series 150 and 250 machines that you hope to be shipping this year and next given that you're hearing more long lead time parts?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Sure. So as I said in my prepared remarks, Jon, our analytics revenue was up 40% year over year and over 10% sequentially. As far as -- we note we recorded a long lead item products, but right now we have the ability to ship one more eProbe 250. We ordered the ability to be able to ship a couple more than that as we get out into 2020.

We would expect to be able to shift these machines -- the first machine maybe by the end of this year or early next year, and the remaining machines sometime in next year. As far as 150s, we are not building any more of those. We have a handful of them that we use from the development standpoint, demo standpoint and we do -- we are shipping one to customer developing more mature technologies in China.

Jon Tanwanteng -- CJS Securities -- Analyst

OK. Great. Thank you for that color. And then are you winning any more customers with DFI that were not historically yield ramp customers or winning back one and not using you guys?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. In fact, all of the DFI accounts are basically -- have not been yield ramp customers. So the first customer, as well as, the ones that we're doing demos now, including the memory one they're all -- were not yield ramp customers. One was your customer yield ramp customer a number of years ago, I should correct myself.

Jon Tanwanteng -- CJS Securities -- Analyst

OK. Great. And then in the quarter because you're I'm not sure if you addressed this or not, did you make or did you receive any make or new solutions payments from global foundries in the quarter? And do you expect any more in the coming quarters?

Christine Russell -- Chief Financial Officer

We are receiving regular quarterly cash payments throughout the remainder of this year. So we receive cash every quarter. And in Q1, we did recognized revenue and not because we received the cash, but we recognized revenue because we had PLC hours that we actually had earned and completed. And so don't expect any additional revenue from the cash payments, but we will regularly be receiving the quarterly cash payments through the end of this year.

Jon Tanwanteng -- CJS Securities -- Analyst

OK. Great. What was the size of those? And kind of what's the expectation for the rest of the year?

Christine Russell -- Chief Financial Officer

It's approximately somewhere around $2 million a quarter.

Jon Tanwanteng -- CJS Securities -- Analyst

OK. Great. And then, John, just a little more color on your expectations for gain share going through the rest of the year, and maybe step between 28 and 14 and below?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. I think we still -- I believe that 2019 gain share will be consistent with 2018 gain share. The majority of that is still coming through 14-nanometer, we do see some 28-nanometer, there's been -- that bounces around a little bit better in Q2 over Q1 2018. And as we get out beyond next year, we believe we will look at to get to the end of the year how 14-nanometer, 28-nanometer, but we believe it will both be a long-lived node at this time of this contract.

Jon Tanwanteng -- CJS Securities -- Analyst

OK. Great. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Our second question comes from the line of Tom Diffely from D.A. Davidson.

Tom Diffely -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

Yes, good afternoon. First a question on the cost structure. You know, it looks almost like you're transferring some people from COGS into opex? Or is it a separate group of people that is making that transition?

Christine Russell -- Chief Financial Officer

Well, actually, what's happening is our old -- our classic business, our IYR business, that was really the business where we took most of our cost reductions, and so that would naturally reduce the cost of sales. Those people were primarily a fixed expense in cost of sales. But as that business move toward declining, those people were either redeployed or we did have a risk as well. So that is a natural reduction of the cost of sales.

And then the offset to that is our new product, the analytics business has higher gross margins. So there's not the kind of labor involved or consultative approach that is more costly.

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

That's I think Tom, you noticed, we have added people in the sales and marketing of Exensio and to a lesser Exensio but primarily Exensio. And we continue to see opportunities to expand our ability to sell in market Exensio. As we said, we have a very large installed base of Exensio out there that are becoming aware of what Exensio can do today. So we will -- we do make continued investment in the field.

Some of that was transferring folks, but a lot of that was hiring new folks.

Tom Diffely -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

OK. That's good to know. All right. And then speaking of Exensio, you said that of your 130 customers, most or all of them only have a partial solution set.

What is the opportunity just with the existing customer base?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

We believe that as I'm highlighting that one example, you know, we believe we can more than double the annual run rate in a number of the top 20 customers of cross-selling them additional modules across our traditional capability moving to the cloud that does provide additional growth beyond that.

Tom Diffely -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

OK. And that was the question too, you talked about the cloud providing better performance. Maybe just a little more color on that?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So Exensio has worked with a conventional relational database for you as customers need to buy from us or from typical RDD suppliers database, and usually a fairly sizable amount of hardware. And when they go and move Exensio to a Cassandra database which is a non-traditional database, the same database that's suppliers, you need to refactor the entire hardware stack. And for most of -- many of our customers they found, it's better to do that with our cloud offering because it gives them better scalability, far better performance for the same hardware dollar spend, but the spend is very spent very differently.

And then that allows them to benefit from Spark, which is in database analytics and that's what we really get that at a factor of 30 performance benefit. It's the combination of faster storage, retrieval and available through Cassandra, and a much faster in database computation in Spark, which parallelizes the analytics as well. And it's just much easier to doing that on the cloud where all of the hardware is new and constantly refreshed, and then scale to the customers' incremental needs and demand.

Tom Diffely -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

OK. That's interesting. OK. Great.

So I guess the question is, given the collections issue during the quarter, are you still expecting growth in the solutions business for the year?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

We're expecting growth in the solutions business primarily ffrom Exensio and DFI analytics business. We do believe we have opportunities for the yield ramp business, particularly in the Asia region, but we don't forecast that at this point, and we take it when it looks like it's attractive for us.

Tom Diffely -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

OK. And then on the eProbe 250 side, are you currently dealing with the logic and memory customer in-house? Or do you have a system on site?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. That's a very good question. So when we are -- we will not put a machine at a customer site without a contract that has payments associated with it. So demos are then shipping wafers to us we have now, I think, four companies, a couple of them in leading-edge logic, one in memory and one in something different that are shipping wafers to us for the purposes of us demonstrating capability in our facility in Millipedes.

Tom Diffely -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

OK. And so the parts for one more tool, that's in addition to your demo tool then?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, I think -- well, hopefully, if you have an opportunity to come to our Analyst Day, you'll get to see the R&D tool, a demo tool, and some fraction of produced tool. And you can see what they look like.

Tom Diffely -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

All right. Great. And then finally, what is left on the buyback authorization?

Christine Russell -- Chief Financial Officer

Oh, let's see, there was $25 million authorized and we have spent around $7 million of that. So we have plenty of room within the authorization to continue the repurchase program.

Tom Diffely -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

Great. OK. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you, and our next question comes from the line of Gus Richard from Northland Capital.

Gus Richard -- Northland Capital -- Analyst

Yeah. Thanks for taking the question. Just help me understand on the solutions revenues down $3.3 million sequentially, $1 million, I understand, is the lack of payments from your Asian customer. What else declined in that? Was that fixed fee business?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

If you remember, there was -- in 2018, we stopped to present completion on a seven-nanometer development program, and therefore, we had that depressed solutions revenue in Q4, I think, report Q3 and Q4 of last year. In Q1, when we and the customer agreed that the work was complete, that then gave us a catch-up payment of over $3 million associated with that percent completion. So that drove up that revenue. So when you take out the puts and takes on the IYR revenue, but mostly takes, the growth in analytics was, as Christine said in her prepared remarks and I also, well over 10% quarter over quarter.

Gus Richard -- Northland Capital -- Analyst

OK. I was under the impression that's load through other income, but I was mistaken, sorry. And then in the yield ramp engagements you're looking at currently, are those consistent with classic yield ramps? Or are those going to be just sell the tools and what the customer go on? Can you give a little more color on how those will be structured going forward?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, that's a great question, Gus. So yeah, in the yield ramp business, we -- I mean, when we traditionally delivered the vehicles and the systems, recognize revenue on a percent completion for the fixed fee portion of the business and then enjoy the loyalty or on the back end once the customer gets into manufacturing. As we found the time to volume, particularly in some of the newer markets, is very long and our risk on that is high. So as we go -- and you know historically, this was the driver for our business.

So we have to be really focused on driving the gain share revenue. As we brought the business to be primarily analytics, we are a lot -- this is a lot less strategic for us and we look at this more opportunistic. So we'd like to see -- we are looking to see more of the revenue upfront paid out ratably on a subscription basis as well, but with no risk on results or volume with a few exceptions.

Gus Richard -- Northland Capital -- Analyst

OK. And that would be recognized ratably over the life of the using the tools?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Over the life of using the system.

Christine Russell -- Chief Financial Officer

Right. I'll make one little additional comment there is we actually on subscription licenses recognize 15% upfront and then the remainder of it is ratable.

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

That's under ASC 606.

Christine Russell -- Chief Financial Officer

That's under ASC 606.

Gus Richard -- Northland Capital -- Analyst

Right. OK. Got it. And then there was some talk around you developing DFI structures to -- for lack of a better term a health monitor for chips in the field.

And I was just wondering if you could add a little color to that? And again, how you would monetize that capability?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

You know, I -- that is not really -- if I capability, but we have built structures and put them in the guideline for years. Customers are starting to ask us to put that inside the product and then make that available through conventional tester -- conventional product test, in other words, through the JTech and eventually downstream while the product is in the field. Now that we have Exensio test, we have ways of collecting that data for the customer because that test on the tester and we didn't have that capability, let's say, you know a few years ago. This is, again, because packaging technology is getting a lot more complicated and there's a lot of customers have been telling us they pass that wafer store.

The ship looks like. They put a bunch of stuff in the package they test it, and so if stuff doesn't work they can't figure out why, how do the silicon shifted in its performance. As you silicon, the amount of strength and the silicon changes and hence, the device characteristics shift, etc. I can go geek off on that for a long time, will do some time, Gus.

But you know the reality is, being able to monitor later stages than wafer store is becoming value to the customer, and customers even expressed the desire to be able to monitor that Silicon performance well in the field as well. And this is an activity we've got going on with one customer we're doing some tape-outs right now, and we expect to expand that as we get into next year.

Gus Richard -- Northland Capital -- Analyst

OK. Got it. All right. Thanks so much.

Operator

Thank you, and our final question comes from the line of Christian Schwab from Craig-Hallum.

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Hi, Christian.

Christian Schwab -- Craig-Hallum Capital Group LLC -- Analyst

I must have missed it. What drove the upside and gain share this quarter?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

The volumes were up quarter over quarter.

Christian Schwab -- Craig-Hallum Capital Group LLC -- Analyst

By who?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Actually, it was broad-based, primarily at 14, a little bit of 28.

Christian Schwab -- Craig-Hallum Capital Group LLC -- Analyst

OK. OK. OK. So last quarter, you said that gain share would be down in '19 to '18.

Now given the strength, which must have maybe surprised you, you now expect gain share to be flat year over year, '18 and '19, is that correct?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Roughly, yes.

Christian Schwab -- Craig-Hallum Capital Group LLC -- Analyst

OK. And then how should we be thinking about, given the drop-off in the solutions business this quarter? How should we be thinking about that on a year-over-year basis?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

We believe solutions will also be up modestly.

Christian Schwab -- Craig-Hallum Capital Group LLC -- Analyst

OK. Solutions will be up modestly and gain share will be flat. OK. So then -- which is fine.

So after we leave 2019 what is your multiyear, not to steal anything from your Analyst Day, but what is your kind of multi-year outlook? Do you still expect gain share to be a growth business or modestly go away over time? And in the Solutions business to be the big grower over time? I was just trying to figure out how we make a bunch of money again to the bottom line as a company.

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So you're right. You don't want to steal our for the Analyst Day, Christian. But yes, I think you've already kind of walked on to it, right? Over time, we do expect gain share to be around for a few meters because the contracts have a few more years on that.

It will fully roll off. But I do look out over a longer time. We believe that, by and large, the business will be driven by the analytics business, which will be primarily on a ratable time-based license in SaaS subscription. We -- as Christine mentioned in her prepared remarks, we believe that that business will approach gross margins that are typical for a company like that in the 70% to 80% range.

And you can work that out at scale as that business grows. We grew 40% year over year. If you look at Q2 of this year versus Q2 of last year, right? As our business grows, we anticipate that being actually more substantial than our historic company peak has done in the past.

Christian Schwab -- Craig-Hallum Capital Group LLC -- Analyst

And then, how are you changing the pricing in order to hit 80% gross margins on that product now?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. So that category has very reasonable gross margins, Christian, it was just always a very small product in current because Solutions has the analytics revenue, as well as, the percent completion on the yield ramp business. The percent completion, if you go back two years ago or three years ago, yield ramp business was the vast majority of the Solutions revenue and it was at a much lower margin than the analytics business was. You roll forward a couple of years the analytics product is now the vast majority of the Solutions revenue as we said, up well over 7% and is at a higher margin.

Christine Russell -- Chief Financial Officer

And Christian, this won't surprise you to hear this, but the cost of sales for delivery and software is substantially lower than the cost for delivering consultative IP as was our classic IYR business. So that is a big component of the improvement in gross margin going forward.

Christian Schwab -- Craig-Hallum Capital Group LLC -- Analyst

OK. And then when would you expect on a [Audio gap] to assume you could see 70% to 80% gross margins at some point? Have you seen --

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

I think, Christine will go over where we see our long-term model under what timeframe, I think that's going to be.

Christian Schwab -- Craig-Hallum Capital Group LLC -- Analyst

OK. Great. Awesome. Thank you, no other questions.

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Christian.

Operator

[Operator instructions] Your next question comes from the line of Tom Diffely with D.A. Davidson.

Tom Diffely -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

Yeah. So just a quick follow-up question. So of the 70% of the business that is analytics, is that all ratable at this point? Or is some of it older style?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

There is still some perpetual licenses on some legacy contracts, but vast majority of license revenue is ratable. There's also managed services for our cloud customers where we manage the database and technology, and so also typically ratable.

Tom Diffely -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

OK. And was the entire analytics business, that was up 40% year over year or just the Exensio part?

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

The entire analytics business was up 40% year over year. The individual products within that were also all by and large very healthily up.

Christine Russell -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. So for your future reference, whenever we refer to analytics sets comprised of both DFI and Exensio.

Tom Diffely -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

Geat. OK, thank you.

Operator

Thank you, ladies and gentlemen. If there are no more questions at this time. I would now like to turn the call back over to John Kibarian, CEO.

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, everyone. We look forward to seeing you on our Analyst Day on October 15th. Take care.

Operator

[Operator signoff]

Duration: 39 minutes

Call participants:

John Kibarian -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Christine Russell -- Chief Financial Officer

Jon Tanwanteng -- CJS Securities -- Analyst

Tom Diffely -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

Gus Richard -- Northland Capital -- Analyst

Christian Schwab -- Craig-Hallum Capital Group LLC -- Analyst

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