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Brandywine Realty Trust (NYSE:BDN)
Q4 2019 Earnings Call
Jan 30, 2020, 9:00 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for standing by and welcome to the Brandywine Realty Trust Fourth Quarter 2019 Earnings Call. [Operator Instructions]

I would now like to hand the conference over to our speaker today, Mr. Gerry Sweeney, President and CEO. Sir, you may begin.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Crystal, thank you, and good morning, everyone, and thank you for participating in our fourth quarter 2019 earnings call.

On today's call with me as usual are George Johnstone, our Executive Vice President of Operations; Dan Palazzo, Our Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer; and Tom Wirth, our Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.

Prior to beginning, certain information discussed during our call may constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities law. Although we believe estimates reflected in these statements are based on reasonable assumptions, we cannot give assurances that the anticipated results will be achieved. For further information on factors that could impact our anticipated results, please reference our press release as well as our most recent annual and quarterly reports that we filed with the SEC.

So after a very brief review of our '19 results, I'll provide an update on the status report of our 2020 business plan. Tom then we'll provide an update on our financial results for the year and a look ahead to the balance of '20. And then after that, all four of us are certainly available for any questions.

We closed 2019 on a very strong note. We exceeded our business plan metrics on cash and GAAP mark to market, tenant retention and achieved many of our other targets including ending the year at 95.5% leased. We achieved our speculative revenue target, which you may recall we increased twice during the course of the year. We did come up a bit short on our occupancy target, primarily due to several tenants not having completed their tenant directed fitout and a minor bankruptcy. Our fourth quarter and full year FFO was $0.38 and $1.43 per share, respectively, and both toward the upper end of our guidance ranges.

Fourth quarter operating performance was strong. It was masked a bit by the termination of KPMG at 1676 International Drive. Absent their vacating, our fourth quarter absorption would have been 112,000 sq. ft. positive, tenant retention would have been 77% and our year-end occupancy would have been 94%. Those statistics, along with the same-store growth of 1.5% on a GAAP basis and 2.7% on a cash basis, with our GAAP rent growth and cash rent growth we think demonstrate the underlying strength of our portfolio's operating performance.

Also, during the fourth quarter results we sold some remaining joint venture properties in Charlottesville, Virginia. They aggregated about $51 million in sales. We were a minority partner, and we recorded an $8 million gain and exited those properties. Also during October, we completed a full building lease for our redevelopment property in Pennsylvania suburbs. This 13-year lease rate was very much in line with our targeted rent levels. The lease, however, was five years longer than anticipated, so required more upfront capital. So our going-in initial cash yield was in the 8% range versus our earlier target -- we picked up five additional years of term. So the overall economic returns were very much in line with our projections. That lease will commence in 2020 and wraps up an extremely successful redevelopment undertaking. As Tom will touch on, we did end the year at a 6.1 EBITDA target, which really does position us well going into 2020.

So turning to 2020. We are off to a very good start. 2020 business plan is really quite simple. It's, first of all, to take advantage of strong market conditions to meet all of our operating targets and drive net effective rent growth, and then secondarily, to capitalize on all the development, planning and approval efforts that we undertook in 2019 by getting some vertical construction under way to drive earnings growth over the next several years. So in pursuit of the operating goals, as you noted in the sup, we're 70% done on our speculative revenue target. Our leasing pipeline remains deep for our existing inventory, including 270,000 sq. ft. in the advanced stages of lease negotiations.

As we outlined on page 10 and 11 of our set, we expect both the Greater Philadelphia and Austin markets to remain strong during the year and generating good activity at building pipeline at good leasing levels. Looking at it, Austin continues to ride the growth wave from corporate attraction efforts and in-market expansions. The unemployment rate fell to 2.6% toward the end of the year. Asking rents continued to increase year-over-year, with about 2.1 million sq. ft. of absorption during the full year 2019.

Philadelphia also experienced about 500,000 sq. ft. of absorption over the last year. The trophy-class vacancy rate went down to 5%, among the lowest of the top five largest MSAs. Philadelphia has grown jobs over the last year, continuation of its performance in the last several years, and we experienced solid demand in the fourth quarter with asking rents increasing 4.4% year-over-year.

Just a one note on a major redevelopment project, 1676 International. That comprehensive $24 million repositioning is substantially complete, and we're in a full marketing mode. We've already leased 75,000 sq. ft. in the lower back for a mid-2020 occupancy. We have about 220,000 sq. ft. remaining. And the current pipeline is just shy of 400,000 sq. ft. In addition, based on the current stacking in the building, we have constructed several spec suites on the lowest available floors to accommodate smaller tenants who are in need of quick occupancy. Rental rate levels in our proposals and the executed lease match our pro forma rates and represented about a 15% increase over the expiring rent.

Our 2020 business plan projects we'll lease an additional 125,000 sq. ft. during the third and fourth quarter of '20 and our spec revenue target does include in the aggregate $3 million of revenue from this project, with about $1.7 million yet to do. The numbers support our previously indicated guidance that this project will generate in excess of a 20% return on incremental capital and we expect it to stabilize around 11% yield on a fully loaded basis.

The '20 operating plan is also headlined by two metrics that we think demonstrate excellent earnings potential. Our cash mark to market range is between 8% and 10% and our GAAP mark to market range is between 17% and 19%, our best in recent memory. We do anticipate that for the year all of our regions will post positive mark to market results on both a cash and GAAP basis. Furthermore, our disciplined focus on controlling capital costs, which we expect to stay below 15% for 2020, combined with this mark to market does result in us growing net effective rents in our 2000 [Phonetic] plan by 8%.

Also from an earnings acceleration standpoint, the major 2020 rollovers do create significant upside in '21 and '22. SHI, for example, in Austin is a 20% cash and 28% GAAP mark to market. Macquarie in Philadelphia is an 18% cash and 22% GAAP. And Reliance again in Philadelphia is a 20% cash and a 24% GAAP mark to market. We do expect our GAAP same store to be in the range of 2% to 4%, primarily driven by Philadelphia, which is about 4.5%, and the Pennsylvania suburbs coming in just shy of 7%. For obvious reasons, Met DC and Austin will be negative due to the KPMG and the SHI move-outs.

One point that we think is worth amplifying is, our same-store forecast due to the inclusion of 1676 we don't really think reflects the underlying strength of our portfolio. For example, without the inclusion of this property, our 2020 cash same-store range would be 2.5% to 4.5%. We did illustrate the impact this in more detail on page 7 of our supplemental package.

Just a couple of quick words on major vacancies. I have already chatted about 1676. Essentially there, we have 125,000 sq. ft. to lease up and need to generate $1.7 million of GAAP revenue in the latter half of the year. SHI, we have about $2.7 million of GAAP revenue from the 184,000 sq. ft. roll. Cash mark to market is over 19%. 80% of that is already booked. So what's left to do is just north of $500,000 of additional spec revenue. When we take a look at the Macquarie rollover at our Commerce Square building in Philadelphia, we don't have any leasing or any GAAP revenue really projected as part of our 2020 business plan.

It's also important to recognize that the remaining open assumptions in our plan are predominantly smaller spaces. In fact no single vacancy is larger than 17,000 sq. ft. And as George can amplify if of interest, we've already executed 81% of our anticipated renewals for the year and have active negotiations under way with a significant percentage of the remaining balance.

Now looking forward for capitalizing on all of our development approval work during 2019. During the past year we achieved all of our goals on all of our development and planning efforts. We completed the full approval -- the full design, development and construction [Technical Issues] all of our production assets, that being Garza and Four Points in Austin, 650 Park and 155 King of Prussia Road in Pennsylvania.

So we are in a full go position on all four of those projects. And as we noted last quarter, these assets can be completed within four to six quarters. They will cost between $40 million and $70 million, so the aggregate investment in those four assets is just north of $200 million. They range in size between 100,000 and 165,000 sq. ft. The cash yield on each of them are circling 8%. And of these projects, we have combined prospect list of 1.8 million sq. ft. So they're ready to go and we do have, as Tom will touch on, two development starts built into our 2020 plan.

A quick observation on a couple of our existing developments. 405 Colorado in downtown Austin is on track for year-end '20 completion. We are now 52% leased, 97,000 sq. ft. remain and we have a leasing pipeline of over 200,000 sq. ft. Project cost remains at $114 million, and we are targeting a yield on cost at 8.5% and expect that to stabilize in mid '21.

The Bulletin Building here in Philadelphia, that renovation work is ongoing and will be completed on budget and on schedule in early Q2 of this year. As you may recall, that entire building is leased to Spark Therapeutics, a life science company owned by Roche Pharmaceuticals, and we still project a 9.3% free and clear return.

In looking at our large master plan mixed-use projects on pages 15 and 16 in our sup, we did provide more information. To highlight a few points, our full master plan approvals are now in place. That's two years ahead of schedule, so we were able to accomplish all of the zoning overlays in 2019. The design, development and pricing is substantially done on the first two buildings. Marketing efforts do continue with about a 1.1 million sq. ft. active pipeline and a significant component of that being life science tenancies. We are in very advanced discussions with joint venture equity financing sources. And as we've indicated before, our current front money investment balance in both of those projects of approximately $90 [Phonetic] million should be sufficient to meet the equity requirements under our contemplated joint venture structures.

If we are successful in finalizing the current equity and debt financing negotiations, we will be in a position to go on the west tower in the first half of 2020. The east tower, which is obviously a larger project with primarily office and a life science component, will require an anchor tenant, and we continue that process as well in addition to working on the equity and debt financing arrangements.

The Schuylkill Yards master plan can accommodate almost 2 million sq. ft. of life science space. As I mentioned last quarter, we are proceeding with the design and development on a 400,000 sq. ft. dedicated life science building. And in addition to that new ground-up life science building, we noted on page 13 that we have started the conversion of 3000 Market Street, an existing 60,000 sq. ft. office building into a life science facility. Design and pricing is being finalized with selective demo already under way. We do expect to deliver that project in the first quarter of 2021. That decision was really driven by the tremendous near-term demand we're seeing from smaller life science companies with the objective that we can -- if we can get them into 3000 Market we can capture their future growth at Schuylkill Yards.

Turning to Austin, our Broadmoor development. Again, all approvals done. As we've noted in the sup, we can do 2.7 million sq. ft. and 855 apartments with the existing buildings -- they're substantially leased to IBM and a couple of tenants -- in place. We're into full planning and costing on three blocks as detailed in the sup. Blocks A and F will be in a position to start by mid-year 2020. Discussions on the train station, public space sequencing and our retail hospitality initiatives are continuing at an excellent pace. We are also in discussions with private capital sources as we finalize the financial plan for an accelerated build-out of this overall redevelopment.

We only have one acquisition program for 2020, which is a 160,000 sq. ft. building in Radnor that we are purchasing as part of our overall transaction with Penn Medicine. This project is an exciting redevelopment opportunity in one of the region's premier submarkets. Right now we anticipate closing on that project in the second quarter of '20 and moving it immediately into redevelopment. On the disposition front, we are marketing several smaller buildings in the Pennsylvania suburbs and continue to have numerous discussions with private equity sources on both the acquisition and disposition fronts.

As you know, our '20 plan has $50 million of incremental spend projected on our two development starts. As we had indicated previously, to finance these opportunities we will be, consistent with what I just mentioned, be evaluating well-timed asset sales, looking at some of our existing joint venture structures to harvest profits, and to make sure we generate sufficient liquidity and maintain our balance sheet target.

So to close, our focus is now on executing our '20 business plan. We are delighted that the bottom line result for 2020 is a strong cash mark to market, net effective rent growth, 3% FFO growth rate and a debt to EBITDA range between 6.1 and 6.3.

I'll now turn the presentation over to Tom for an overview of the financial results.

Thomas E. Wirth -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Gerry.

Our fourth quarter net income totaled $16.7 million or $0.09 per diluted share, and FFO totaled $67 million or $0.38 per diluted share, which were at the upper end of our guidance estimates.

Some general observations regarding the fourth quarter results. Operating results were generally in line with our third quarter guidance. One highlight is our operating expenses did benefit from lower tenant reserves, while our G&A was negatively impacted by some one-time transactional and professional costs, and other income was below our forecast also for the fourth quarter due to some timing of anticipated [Phonetic] transactions.

Our fourth quarter same-store GAAP NOI growth was negatively impacted by some tenants that had some substantial completion delays and tenant leasing slides, all of which will commence in the first quarter of 2020. Our fourth quarter fixed charge and interest rate coverage ratios were 3.7 and 4.1 respectively. Both metrics improved as compared to the fourth quarter of 2018 and were better than our forecasted results.

Our fourth quarter annualized net debt to EBITDA decreased to 6.1, and at the lower end of our 6.0 to 6.3 guidance. The ratio benefited from improved operating income and higher than expected year-end cash balances. The increase in cash was primarily due to the delay of our acquisition of the land parcel in Radnor, Pennsylvania, which we anticipate will close during this quarter, and sales proceeds from the joint venture interest in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Looking forward to the first quarter of 2020, we have the following general assumptions. Portfolio operating income will total approximately $84 million and will be sequentially lower by $1 million primarily due to increased operating expenses. FFO contributions from our unconsolidated joint ventures will total about $2.5 million for the first quarter, which is down about $400 million from the fourth quarter and down $200,000 after adjusting for the PJP sale in Charlottesville. For the full year 2020, the FFO contribution is estimated to be about $9.5 million.

Our fourth quarter G&A will increase from $6.9 million to $9.5 million. That sequential increase is consistent with prior years and primarily due to the timing of deferred compensation expense recognition. For the full year, G&A expense we estimate will total about $32 million.

Interest [Phonetic] will be about $20.5 million for the first quarter, with 97.5 [Phonetic] of the balance fixed rate on our balance sheet. Capitalized interest will approximate $700,000, and full year interest rate will approximate $82 million. Looking at that plan, we have several capital items we are talking about. One assumption is the payoff of the Four Tower Bridge mortgage about $9 million in November 2020. Capitalized interest will be about between $3.2 million to [Technical Issues] million, up a little bit from last year. We're going to pay off the Two Logan mortgage which matures on May 1. This mortgage approximates $80 million at just under a 4% rate.

Termination fee and other income. We continue to anticipate termination and the fee income totaling $4 million for the first quarter and $11.5 million for the year. Net management fees. Quarterly NOI will be $2.5 million and will approximate $8 million for the year. Land sales and tax provision, we expect to net to zero, and we have no anticipated ATM or share buyback activity.

On the investments. As Gerry mentioned, guidance assumes no new sales activity. Building acquisition activity is for 250 King of Prussia Road for $20 million and an additional land parcel at Radnor which did get delayed to the beginning of 2020, and that's another $18 million. Any development starts that we have which is $50 million in our liquidity, we do not expect them to generate, if they do start, any earnings in 2020.

Our CAD range is 71% to 78%. The main contributors is going to be some higher straight-line rent this year versus next, just under $10 million and again the releasing space in 1676 is going to generate revenue maintain capital of [Indecipherable] due to the tenants that will come in within the first year of the vacancy. Our total uses in capital for the year is $535 million: $150 million of development; $130 million for dividends; revenue maintain capital of $64 million; revenue create of $50 million; mortgage amortization, $7 million; $90 million of debt payoffs, which I mentioned earlier for the mortgages; the acquisition of 250 King of Prussia Road for $20 million and the acquisition of the land for $19 million.

Primary sources will be cash flow of $220 million: $215 [Phonetic] million of line use, using up the $90 million of cash we have on hand and roughly $10 million of land sales that we have programmed.

Based on that capital plan, our line of credit balance will be approximately $250 million at year-end. We also project that our net debt to EBITDA will range between 6.1 and 6.3, with the main variable being timing and scope of our development activities.

In addition, our debt to GAV will be between 42% and 43%. In addition, we anticipate our fixed charge ratio will approximate 3.7 and the interest coverage will approximate 4.1.

I'll now turn the call back over to Gerry.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Great, Tom. Thank you very much. With that, we are delighted to open up the floor for questions. As we always do, we ask that in the interest of time you limit yourself to one question and a follow-up. Crystal?

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] And our first question comes from James Feldman from Bank of America. Your line is open.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Great. Thank you, and good morning.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Good morning.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

I just wanted to start with just kind of the financing side. So two questions. One is, can you just talk more about potential JV partners or just kind of what you're lining up in terms of magnitude and size and maybe even your fees for some of these larger developments? And then secondly, I know you didn't include any sales in guidance. But it sounds like you could be doing sales if you start some of these developments. So maybe if you could talk about the earnings impact on that or is that not going to be meaningful?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Yes, Jamie, thanks for the question. On the joint venture side, the one that we're in very advanced discussion was related to our project at Schuylkill Yards, and frankly they're very consistent with what we have indicated before. The objective would be for Brandywine to remain at 35% partner in those transactions. The equity source would wind up providing 65% of the equity and we will line up construction and mini perm debt financing through our banking syndicate. There would be market rate development fees and there are leasing fees, obviously, property management fees for Brandywine. And we do expect that this structure we're contemplating right now will be reflected in the final documentation. So we feel very good about how those discussions are going.

As we focus on the Broadmoor development, we certainly have a wide range of institutions -- we are talking to about a variety of financial structures at Broadmoor, ranging from participating in a couple of the earlier phases to providing infrastructure funding. All of those we think will progress over the next couple of quarters. And again, if you think about the comments Tom and I made, we're really gearing up starting the first vertical construction and site work at Broadmoor very early in the second half of 2020. So our goal would be to finalize those venture structures sometime by mid second quarter of this year and have a lot more clarity we can share with our investor base.

I think -- as we've been indicating, we do think that one of the sources of capital for these production level assets are going to be some of the smaller asset sales. And we do believe in our plan that the timing of those sales will have negligible impact on 2020 guidance. And that's been kind of the model we set forth in the last several years, and we'd expect that to continue as well.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Great. Thank you. I guess just to follow up -- so it sounds like Schuylkill Yards is probably one partner and [Indecipherable] Broadmoor may be multiple partners, depending on the building. Is that the right way to think about it?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Well, I think so, but please give us latitude as some of these discussions involve. I think our focus at Schuylkill Yards is quite candidly on the first two buildings. And I think we're talking to a couple of groups with really one primary partner on both of those buildings, where at Broadmoor, I think, Jamie, we're still in the process of vetting through a number of expressions of interest and advanced discussions on how that will ultimately lay out, whether it's an institutional partner that helps us on the residential side or the mixed-use side or some of the retail and infrastructure developments.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Okay. All right. Thank you.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

You're welcome.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Craig Mailman from KeyBanc Capital Markets. Your line is open.

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Hey, guys.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Good morning.

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

To circle back on the occupancy piece, back in October you guys seemed pretty confident you're going to hit the target for the year. And I know, Gerry, you mentioned kind of construction delays and the bankruptcy. Could you just elaborate a little bit more about kind of some specifics about [Indecipherable] It seemed like a big miss relative to your confidence back in October.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

I'm not sure we'd categorize a big miss by any stretch. But George, let me defer to you and kind of walk through some of the detail there.

George D. Johnstone -- Executive Vice President of Operations

Yeah, we really kind of had three moving pieces, Craig, the smallest of which was a 20,000 sq. ft. bankruptcy in Austin that kind of came out of nowhere. So we ended up getting that space back in early December. And we feel good about the space that we got back and then have it incorporated into our plan to relet in 2020.

The other two components really were tenants not substantially completing their tenant fit work. These are conditions where the tenants building out the space and Brandywine is not. And so, our policies to date have been that if that space isn't substantially complete and we're not recognizing income on it, we don't reflect it as occupied. And that was about 50 basis points when it was all said and done.

And then the third piece were just some leasing slides themselves that we -- we felt confident back on the October call that we were going to get them paper. They were quick move-ins because the space was in fact ready for tenancy, and those occupancies slid into January and they have subsequently to year-end occupied. So those were really the three pieces.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Yeah. I mean, just to add on to George's observation on the tenant directed fitout. These are leases that have commenced. They're executed. Tenants are there. The tenant is behind schedule on completing their tenant fitout. And based upon the revenue recognition rules, because that space is not quote unquote ready for its intended use, we cannot recognize revenue. So -- we've had this a number of -- we have a number of quarters where, from our perspective, the lease is signed, the tenant is either in free rent period or in some cases actually paying us cash rent, but they've yet to complete their fitout and therefore we can't recognize revenue.

So, as George touched on, that's an ongoing struggle we have because, to the extent that the tenant wants to do their own fitout, we certainly are happy to have them do that, subject to trigger dates on the lease commencement so that we know that any of their delay doesn't affect the commencement date of the lease. The vast majority of times, tenants complete their space well ahead of scheduled to rent, but there is always cases where that does not occur.

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

And what industry was the bankrupt tenant in Austin?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

They were a small mortgage lender.

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

And then just on the Macquarie and Reliance spaces, any update there on progress in backfilling?

George D. Johnstone -- Executive Vice President of Operations

Yeah, Craig, it's George again. We're seeing most of the activity on the Macquarie spaces obviously because they come back to us first, but seeing activity on both. We've got proposals out on about 40% of that space already and we've got a handful of inquiries and tours not yet at the proposal stage, but we've got a pipeline that actually exceeds the 150,000 sq. ft. that we're getting back from Macquarie.

Reliance, again, those are contiguous floors and we have seen a couple of inspections by some larger tenants that have either a '21 or maybe even a first quarter '22 occupancy event and they're just kind of [Indecipherable] what the opportunities are. And again, we don't get that space back from Reliance until 12/31 of 2020.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Great. In addition to that, Craig, we've also -- the team has done a great job in kind of forward-planning exactly what selective demo we want to do. We've got programs in place to upgrade some of the common area. So the expectation would be similar to what we did frankly at 1676, as soon as that tenant vacates, we'll be in there. The plan will be -- well, then lock and load it. We will have all the permits in place to go immediately commence work, so we can accelerate delivery of some of that space.

And certainly as you know from previous discussions, the bifurcation of space between smaller floor plates, upper tower and baseline really gives us a range of options to present to the tenant market. So even on the larger floor plates, we'll be pre-building some spaces, including putting some furniture in there to try and to accelerate the potential occupancy dates of those floors.

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Got it. So just one quick follow-up on Jamie's question on the financing piece. It sounds like you guys are still trying to figure out the optimal structure. But how much is kind of pricing playing into the discussions at this point? Are you guys close to your partners on expectations? Or is that kind of more of a sticking point than maybe just the correct structure?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

No, no, no. I wouldn't say their pricing is an issue at all.

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Okay. Thank you.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

You're welcome.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Jason Green from Evercore. Your line is open.

Jason Green -- Evercore -- Analyst

Good morning. I appreciate the color on the fiscal year '20 move-outs. I guess, if you're able, as we look out over '21 and '22, we know Reliance is leaving space greater than 100,000 sq. ft. I thought it was in '21 but you guys just mentioned at the end of '20. But I guess outside of Reliance, are there any other kind of 100,000 to 150,000 or greater sq. ft. tenants that we should be thinking about in modeling in '20, '21 and '22 that are likely to move out?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Yeah. A large rollover with IBM in Austin that we're confident of a renewal there. In Philadelphia, we've got a large law firm that we're already in active discussions with about renewal. And then Reliance was the other. I mean, that's really the inventory of kind of the six figure square footage type tenants.

Jason Green -- Evercore -- Analyst

Okay. And then, just curious, this might be a little bit of overanalyzing on our part. But looking at the Schuylkill Yards page in the supplemental, we noted that it no longer refers to opportunity zones. Is there any reason for that? And then just more broadly, with some of the news going on about opportunity zones, if there is kind of any opinion that you guys can share about what's going on?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

It should say opportunity zone.

Thomas E. Wirth -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. I think if we changed the -- if we changed the bullet...

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

And actually, Jason, it's the fourth bullet down under overview.

Jason Green -- Evercore -- Analyst

Okay.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Yeah. So, it's still there, a lot of federal opportunities. Look, I will say a number of the equity partners that we initially talked to on Schuylkill Yards were very interested in federal opportunities. And I think some of those discussions took some time because there was some debate in Washington on what the actual final regulations would be. And I think there were some points of debate in the tax and investments regarding what those requirements would be.

I think that dust has settled. And certainly, we continue to have a surprisingly good reaction from investors who are focused on opportunities to invest in very high quality real estate. And I think one of the things that we have learned through these opportunity zone discussions is that where the federal regulation is directed toward getting money into areas that have been lacking in investments, our location next to the train station and the universities I think has given a lot of the investors we have spoken to a lot of comfort that the investment thesis has been proven because of the work we've done at Sierra center with Spark Therapeutics, the main post office building, FMC Tower, etc.

So, I think we've resonated well from both the federal opportunity zone standpoint, but also and probably more importantly, that the execution level on the real estate has gone very well.

Jason Green -- Evercore -- Analyst

Got it. Thank you very much.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

You're welcome.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Manny Korchman from Citi. Your line is open [Technical Issues] And we're going to take our next question from Omotayo Okusanya from Mizuho. Your line is open.

Omotayo Okusanya -- Mizuho Securities -- Analyst

Yes, good morning, everyone.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Good morning.

Omotayo Okusanya -- Mizuho Securities -- Analyst

Morning, Gerry. First question, Discovery Labs, the large development that's happening in King of Prussia for life sciences, I mean, do you look at that and say that's going to be competitive against what you're doing in Schuylkill Yards or is it kind of -- that it's so far away or 30 minutes away, you don't really see that as competing product?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Yes. Excellent question. And I guess, I mean, we'd certainly track that development. And I think two reactions. One is, I think it's wonderful because I think what it really speaks to is the real accelerated emergence of a growing life science sector here in Philadelphia, driven a lot by these cell therapy technologies, the tremendous research being done by the Wistar Institute, the pharma companies, organizations like obviously Spark Therapeutics and now Roche, Children's Hospital. So, from our perspective, it's been a really strong independent validation that this market really is primed to elevate its life science development. So, that's very, very good news for us.

Relative to competition, I think we've always operated on the standpoint that we compete against everybody. And we'll be challenged to present Schuylkill Yards as a preferred location, an efficiency module compared to any other location within the regional marketplace. But fundamentally, even recognizing that competitive threat or potential, I think we're just really excited about the fundamental demand drivers that we're seeing in this market segment.

We've talked about the conversion of 3000 Market. That's really been totally focused driven by the fact that our leasing team is seeing a tremendous number of emerging life science companies with good financial sponsorship and great research capacity who kind of a short timeline to actually start the planned flag. And we thought that 3000 Market could provide an excellent opportunity to capture some of that near-term demand and as those companies implement their research capacity and start going through trials and raise more capital that we could capture their growth at Schuylkill Yards, so.

Omotayo Okusanya -- Mizuho Securities -- Analyst

And then just another quick one if you don't mind. The Northrop Grumman lease, when does that expire?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

That expires in January?

George D. Johnstone -- Executive Vice President of Operations

January of '21.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

And on that building we have plans under way to do one of two things, either significantly renovate it and/or sell or joint ventures. So, we're pretty far along in the thought process there.

Omotayo Okusanya -- Mizuho Securities -- Analyst

Okay.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Daniel Ismail from Green Street Advisors. Your line is open.

Daniel Ismail -- Green Street Advisors, LLC -- Analyst

Great. Good morning.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Good morning.

Daniel Ismail -- Green Street Advisors, LLC -- Analyst

With respect to the leasing pipeline in Philadelphia, are these mostly tenants in the markets or are you entertaining new out of towners taking a look at Philadelphia as a destination?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Yes. I think when we look at the pipeline, it's probably broken down by about 50% outside the city, 50% inside the city. But of what's inside the city, they're all growth. So it's net growth, not just share shuffling. So I think we feel pretty good about the kind of regionwide in Northeast quarter marketing program.

I will say a number of the life science companies are really from outside the area. So, I think there's a little bit of a skewing there. And the major office or traditional tenants that we're tracking down I think are pretty evenly split between kind of in and outside of market companies.

Daniel Ismail -- Green Street Advisors, LLC -- Analyst

And staying on Philly, we've seen tenants identify into space, the cycle. Do you think your tenants have mostly gone through that phase or is there still more to go?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

I'm sorry, Danny, your question cut out a little bit on us here.

Daniel Ismail -- Green Street Advisors, LLC -- Analyst

Oh, sorry. Yes, I was referring to densification and the trend that we've seen the cycle has been that tenants have identified, call it, 20% or so into their space. Do you think that trend still has some more legs to go, or do you think we're mostly gone through that trends?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Look, I think it's going to be an ongoing trend. And I think that's really where our properties are well positioned versus our competitive set. I mean, what we're seeing in due to the tight labor market, focus on employee culture and talent attraction, they're really well-appointed buildings with the full amenity packages like we have, tend to rise at the top of the prospect list.

So, we do think that that valuation of efficiency of space design is a secular trend in our business. We also think that, maybe to your core question, is that I think the original densification targets that a lot of companies set are have been reevaluated upward. The initial push was to densify down to 100 to 125 etc. sq. ft. per employee. We're not seeing that at all. We're basically seeing kind of almost a reversion to that 150 to 200 sq. ft. range. What you're really saying is where there may be a higher percentage of open floor plans or kind of in Tier 4 offices, you're seeing wider circulation areas, you're seeing a much more focus on space collaboration within tenant spaces accretion, more common area, gathering points.

So, when we look at some of the major tenancies that we've, we've done recently and certainly even on our development projects, we're seeing a pretty stable outlook on how many square feet per employee tenants will have. In fact in a number of discussions, we're really driving a little bit away from the rental rate per square foot and beginning to focus very much on the occupancy cost per employee.

So, it tends to be a much significant positive selling point for us that we're able to present much more efficient floor plates, column free, 10 foot finished ceilings etc. that are delivering a much higher value proposition to our tenant base.

Daniel Ismail -- Green Street Advisors, LLC -- Analyst

That's helpful. Thanks.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Manny Korchman from Citi. Your line is open.

Emmanuel Korchman -- Citigroup Inc. -- Analyst

Hey there. I think that's better. Sorry about that. Just as we think about both Schuylkill and Broadmoor and the large office components you're building there, are you completely dual tracking the process they're talking to tenant trying to find anchor tenants, getting ready to go-live with those buildings? Or do you need to find the capital source first to make those projects sort of live?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Manny, very much a dual tracking. In fact, I mean, marketing is usually the tip of the sphere. So, we -- that's why we amplified during the commentary, about 2019 for us on the development front was really getting through all the approvals. I mean, there are a lot of them as you all well know. Getting completely through the design development process, down to construction documents for most of the projects, getting final pricing done, because that really -- if we go ahead of time of escalating construction costs, you need to kind of know what your platform is. And we've got that done.

While we're doing that, we're still marketing. But you want to get to the point where we got quantitative certainty of what you -- what the cost of delivery will be. So, whether it was on projects like ours that are four points or the suburban properties in Philadelphia or Schuylkill Yards or Broadmoor, mission critical was getting everything framed out. We've done that. The marketing process on every one of those projects, i.e. the four production assets in the Schuylkill Yards and Broadmoor, all those marketing efforts have been launched. We've got big prospects going, discussions going on, as I mentioned, a prospect pipeline or the development -- on the production assets of almost 1.8 million sq. ft.

So, our perspective has been, the more we can demonstrate market demand drivers at our targeted rental rate levels, the more constructive those financing discussions are. We'd always rather be in a position where we mitigated some of the lease-up risk by the pipeline because that facilitates a much more constructive discussion with the financing sources.

Emmanuel Korchman -- Citigroup Inc. -- Analyst

If we think about that same sort of concept, then if you get closer, if you land a pre-lease, are you still on the track to do a JV on the development project or would you then consider maybe selling or JV-ing one of your stabilized assets instead?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Well, I think the immediate near term as we're looking at over the next several months, I think given that dynamic and focusing on Schuylkill Yards, I think the bias would still be to do a joint venture at least on those first two buildings.

Emmanuel Korchman -- Citigroup Inc. -- Analyst

Thanks, guys.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. And we do have a follow-up question from James Feldman from Bank of America. Your line is open.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Great. Thank you. I just wanted to follow up on your comments on Northrop. So, can you just talk about the building? I think looking at your top tenants list, it's like a number 8 tenant. Is that -- are they moving out of that entire space? I just think we want more color on exactly the story there.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Yeah. They do plan on vacating the building, which we think -- they've been in there about 15 years. It's a great project in our Dulles Corner development and we fully expect to have a very successful renovation. We're successful sale there. So, we're going to take one of those two paths as we look forward to '21.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

When do they expire exactly?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

The end of the year.

Thomas E. Wirth -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

January of '21.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Yes, January of '21.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

January of '21. Okay. And it's 250,000 sq. ft.?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Right, correct.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

And do you have, like, are you in any talks -- early talks with anyone else to backfill it or do you think a sale is more likely? How are you guys thinking about it?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Well, I think there is, I mean, it's certainly been a tightening of large blocks of space in that market. The team has identified a couple of replacement tenants. We think that there is a very good mark-to-market there. And I think, Jamie, we would be in a position by kind of the next quarter call to really frame out what the final plan is. We have, we've had renovation plans pulled together and price for the building, which are very exciting, but we also want to evaluate what the best financial outcome for Brandywine is as well.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Okay. What are they paying in rent? Or, like, where do you think they're mark-to-marketed?

George D. Johnstone -- Executive Vice President of Operations

Their mark-to-market is north of 20%.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Okay. All right. And then it looks like as you look at your kind of speculative development or speculative leasing pipeline, it looks like DC is kind of lagging the other markets. Can you just talk about what's in that number and what is it like a couple of large leases that you need that that maybe that's why is it chunkier or is DC just kind of slower than in some of these other markets? I know it's slow, but slower than you thought?

George D. Johnstone -- Executive Vice President of Operations

No, I think, as Gerry outlined there's still 125,000 sq. ft. at 1676 in that leasing plan left to achieve. And then we've got some additional leasing in our suburban Maryland portfolio and the remaining -- and the other buildings that we have in Tysons at 8260 Greensboro and 8521 Leesburg Pike, so.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

So, I guess is there anything that's kind of falling out of beds as you made your first outlook? Or everything is kind of going as expected?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

No, I think everything is kind of going as expected. Because 1676 was program for the third and fourth quarter. The pipeline that we have is still tracking toward that timeline. The other spaces and the other buildings, we're really kind of 10,000 to 15,000 sq. ft. tenancies that again I think just start to lay in as the year progresses.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Okay. And then what are your big picture thoughts on supply in Austin? I know there's a lot of demand. But are you -- are there certain pockets you guys think are starting to get a little risky?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Certainly we're feeling very -- continue feeling incredibly bullish on the Southwest, primarily due to some of the barriers to new construction. So, I think, we're seeing tremendous pipeline of deals in our [Indecipherable] of development down in the Southwest. Look, I mean there's a lot of square footage under construction in Austin. I think the last numbers I saw where they were about 60% pre-leased. The demand driver is still very, very good. So, our four points development kind of up in the Northwest, that's the one we're really tracking in terms of competitive supply, Jamie. But certainly we feel good about our position with 405 and feel extremely good about what we can convert down at Garza.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Okay. And then finally from me kind of big picture on Northern Virginia. I mean, we keep hearing about the impact of the JEDI contract and what that will mean for office demand or maybe there's just optimism it will pick up office demand. I'm curious what you guys are seeing on the ground and what -- if you think about the next kind of year or so in that market, do you think you'll see a change in demand or just fundamentals?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Yes. Look, I think from -- if you take a look at the Northern Virginia posted 4 million sq. ft. of absorption. One of the best years they've had since I think 2006, with kind of a pretty strong tech and cybersecurity demand, 71% the job growth in the Met DC area kind of floated into Northern Virginia.

So we're actually, we're seeing rents being pushed on a new development projects, which is great. That's one of the things when we take a look at 2340, where given that large mark-to-market that George indicated and really not many large blocks of space available, particularly buildings that have the high level of structured parking that we have at that building. We think that there is a lot of green shoots that will further drive demand.

With the JEDI contract between Microsoft and Amazon, web search are looking for more space in the market. You've seen a number of other major tenants kind of focus on the toll road quarter. I think, anecdotally, what we're seeing Jamie even with the redevelopment of 1676 is a lot of big requirements. I mean, we've got proposals out, a number of proposals that are over 100,000 sq. ft.

So, I think that marketplace from a demand perspective in terms of velocity of tenants and additional square feet looking for new homes is a much better landscape than it was last year. How that translates into net effective rent growth in the concession package, I think still remains to be seen. But the little window we have in through 1676 is our pro forma rent targets are being met, we're keeping our capital costs right in line with our projections And we anticipate being able to drive that to, as I mentioned earlier, 9% return on cost.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Does this motivate you to get bigger there? I know you just did a big sale there to shrink. But you feel like market changed, would you have made that call?

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

No, I think we're happy with our platform right down there now. I think we continue to talk to capital sources and other companies about other things to do in that marketplace. But right now the major focus in that market for us is to execute the Rockpoint joint venture efficiently and profitably, solve the 1676 absorption pace for 2020 and really as we get that done take a look and see what we plan on doing for future years.

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Okay. All right. Thank you.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. And I am showing no further questions from our phone lines. And I'd like to turn the conference back over to Gerry Sweeney for any closing remarks.

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Great. Well, look, everyone, thank you very much for participating in the call, and we look forward to updating you on our 2020 business plan progression and our April first quarter call. Thank you very much.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Duration: 58 minutes

Call participants:

Gerard H. Sweeney -- President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee

Thomas E. Wirth -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

George D. Johnstone -- Executive Vice President of Operations

James Feldman -- Bank of America -- Analyst

Craig Mailman -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Jason Green -- Evercore -- Analyst

Omotayo Okusanya -- Mizuho Securities -- Analyst

Daniel Ismail -- Green Street Advisors, LLC -- Analyst

Emmanuel Korchman -- Citigroup Inc. -- Analyst

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