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SPS Commerce (NASDAQ:SPSC)
Q1 2020 Earnings Call
Apr 30, 2020, 4:30 p.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:


Operator

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for standing by, and welcome to the SPS Commerce Q1 2020 earnings call. [Operator instructions] As a reminder, this conference is being recorded. I would now like to hand the conference over to your speaker today, Irmina Blaszczyk. May begin.

Irmina Blaszczyk -- Managing Director, The Blueshirt Group

Thank you, Lou. Good afternoon, everyone, and thank you for joining us on SPS Commerce first-quarter 2020 conference call. We will make certain statements and projections today, including with respect to our expected financial results, go-to-market strategy and efforts designed to increase our traction and penetration with retailers and other customers. These statements and projections are forward-looking and involve a number of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially.

We note in particular that uncertainty regarding the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on our performance could cause actual results to differ materially from our projections. Please note that these forward-looking statements reflect our opinions only as of the date of this call, and we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. Please refer to our SEC filings, specifically our Form 10-K, as well as our financial results press release we furnished via Form 8-K to the SEC earlier today for a more detailed description of the risk factors that may affect our results. These documents are available at our website, spscommerce.com, and at the SEC's website, sec.gov.

In addition, we are providing a historical datasheet for easy reference on our Investor Relations section of our website, spscommerce.com. During our call today, we will discuss adjusted EBITDA, financial measures and non-GAAP earnings per share. In our press release and our filings with the SEC, each of which is posted on our website, we will find additional disclosures regarding these non-GAAP and adjusted EBITDA measures, including reconciliations of these measures with comparable GAAP measures. And with that, I will turn the call over to Archie.

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Irmina, and welcome, everyone. First and foremost, we hope you're all staying safe and well, and our thoughts are with everyone affected by the coronavirus pandemic. The health and safety of our employees, customers and partners is a top priority, and we remain fully committed to support the suppliers and retailers that serve our communities in these challenging times. SPS Commerce services are absolutely critical to our customers to ensure they are able to deliver the day-to-day essentials we all need.

We are a cloud-native company and the investments we have made over the years in our tools, systems and processes enable us to deliver uninterrupted and secure service anywhere in the world, often with nothing more than a web browser. Due to the nature of the SaaS business model, we are able to operate remotely, providing a full-service experience to existing customers and promptly onboarding new suppliers as needed. For the first quarter, revenue grew 11% to $74.2 million. Recurring revenue grew 12% and adjusted EBITDA grew 24% to $20.4 million.

SPS Commerce provides a mission-critical service to suppliers and retailers at a time when e-commerce has become essential to their business. We recently engaged with US Foods, a leading foodservice distributor, about leveraging EDI and automating their supply chain. As COVID-19 started to disrupt operations in the food industry, US Foods realized that electronic processes are critical to maintain effective business operations. They identified EDI as a crucial component in this process, requiring all of their suppliers to move to electronic order fulfillment.

In a matter of four weeks, SPS Commerce has signed on more suppliers to transact EDI with U.S. Foods than they have on their own over the last 10 years. US Foods have also formed grocery sector partnerships, enabling it to deliver product directly to a retailer's distribution center or stores. These new partnerships further emphasize the need for supply chain efficiencies to help retailers across the United States maintain inventory and meet increasing consumer demand.

Many of the retailers we work with are expanding on their multichannel sourcing strategy to meet increasing demand. Costco, for example, has regularly been using SPS for same-day vendor setup and has relied on us over the past two -- few weeks to add approximately 200 new vendors to their network and ensure they are up and running to fill Costco's orders within hours. We have also been working with Walgreens, onboarding new critical suppliers of essential products such as face masks. With our full service, same-day onboarding capabilities, SPS was able to increase speed to market for a variety of critical products from new suppliers.

Stay at home government directives have also caused an abrupt decline in brick-and-mortar retail sales and a shift to online shopping. E-commerce is now an integral and sometimes necessary part of our lives, prompting retailers to evaluate their operational efficiencies and quickly adapt to stay relevant. As part of SPS Commerce fulfillment, we launched carrier service to help suppliers manage drop ship orders, helping them save time with functionality like batch processing and reduce costs with rate shopping capability for all major carriers in the U.S. and Canada.

Carrier Service, which was just launched in March, is being used by our customers to fulfill orders for Amazon, Costco, Home Depot, Bed Bath & Beyond, and Target. We are pleased with the product's acceptance to date as we strive to support our trading community in this challenging environment. We expect the current dynamics impacting retailers and suppliers will continue to amplify the need for process automation. And SPS Commerce is committed to support and improve trading partner relationships in every way we can.

We are also mindful of the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the uncertainty around its implications across the retail landscape. SPS Commerce has a very large network of trading partners across various industries, and we see retailers and suppliers adapting and implementing e-commerce capabilities to serve rapidly evolving consumer demand. Across our network and diverse end markets, we have seen a steady volume of transactions since March with approximately half of our networks seeing increased volume while some have experienced a decline. The dynamics of the situation continue to evolve.

At this time, we are seeing increased demand for automation from retailers embracing e-commerce and implementing dropship capabilities. Our exposure to the grocery supply chain has resulted in an increase in the onboarding of new suppliers for retailers, as well as foodservice and grocery distributors. These are the dynamics that drive demand for SPS Commerce solutions, and we are optimistic about the long-term opportunities as we continue to support our growing network of over 31,000 trading partners. As we look at the rest of 2020, this uncertainty around the duration and the magnitude of the pandemic and its growing impact on the economy, we are factoring in the possibility of continued pressure on retailers, a decline in demand for our solutions such as analytics and a push out in enterprise ERP implementations, all of which would negatively impact our business.

These are dynamics we cannot predict or control. But with our cloud-native operational model, we are well-positioned to provide support to our customers, partners and our community. In summary, SPS continues to be a mission-critical aspect of the global supply chain. Our vision to be the world's retail network is being realized.

Our retail supply chain solutions are keeping trading partners connected, especially now during this time of crisis and disruption. The work we do is vital, and I would like to thank all of our employees for their ongoing commitment to supporting our customers and ensuring business and supply continuity for our communities. We achieved our 10th year as a public company in April. And based on our history of consistent execution and ongoing focus on our customers' needs, we believe SPS Commerce will emerge from this crisis stronger than ever.

With that, I'll turn it over to Kim to discuss our financial results.

Kim Nelson -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Archie. We delivered a solid first quarter of 2020. Revenue was $74.2 million, an 11% increase over Q1 of last year and represented our 77th consecutive quarter of revenue growth. Recurring revenue this quarter grew 12% year over year.

The total number of recurring revenue customers increased 5% year over year to approximately 31,000. For Q1, wallet share was up 6% year over year at approximately 9,100. For the quarter, adjusted EBITDA was $20.4 million, compared to $16.5 million in Q1 of last year. We ended the quarter with total cash and marketable securities of approximately $215 million.

We also repurchased $12 million of SPS shares in the quarter. Now turning to guidance. For the second quarter of 2020, we expect revenue to be in the range of 73.8 million to $74.8 million. We expect adjusted EBITDA to be in the range of 19 million to 20 million.

We expect fully diluted earnings per share to be approximately $0.17 to $0.19 with fully diluted weighted average shares outstanding of approximately 36.2 million shares. We expect non-GAAP diluted earnings per share to be approximately $0.29 to $0.31, with stock-based compensation expense of approximately $5.1 million, depreciation expense of approximately 3.5 million and amortization expense of approximately $1.4 million. As a result of the government-mandated office closures and reduced travel, we are recognizing savings and we'll continue to manage discretionary spending accordingly given ongoing uncertainties resulting from the pandemic. However, we're in a unique position to expand our market presence, and we will continue to invest in product innovation to advance our technology leadership and continue to deliver the best customer experience.

We are withdrawing 2020 annual guidance due to uncertainty related to the macroeconomic impact of the pandemic and the lack of visibility into the magnitude of the impact on our retail network. Dynamics that may negatively impact our business include prolonged store closures, bankruptcies, reduced demand for our analytics product, and potential push out in ERP migration. Dynamics that may positively impact our business include increased enablement campaign activity driven by current e-commerce trends, including demand for our dropship product. We will continue to monitor the macroeconomic impact on retail dynamics and reassess our visibility for the full year at the end of the second quarter.

However, given our history of strong operating leverage and the resilience of our SaaS business model, we remain confident in our ability to expand adjusted EBITDA margin in 2020 and achieve our long-term adjusted EBITDA margin target of 35%. Although we are withdrawing guidance for the year, we are providing the following information for modeling purpose. We expect stock-based compensation expense for the year of approximately $19.7 million, depreciation expense of approximately $13.8 million, and amortization expense of approximately $5.6 million. Also, for the remainder of the year on a quarterly basis, investors should model a 30% effective tax rate calculated on GAAP pre-tax net earnings.

In summary, we expect that the current supply chain dynamics will amplify the need for e-commerce and EDI solutions in the long term, and we believe SPS Commerce is uniquely positioned to capitalize on that opportunity. We are pleased with our ability to continue to provide mission-critical solutions to retailers and suppliers, and we'd like to thank all our employees for their unyielding effort and dedication to support the SPS Commerce network in these challenging times. With that, I'd like to open the call to questions.

Questions & Answers:


Operator

[Operator instructions] Your first question comes from the line of Matt Pfau from William Blair.

Matt Pfau -- William Blair and Company -- Analyst

Hey, guys. Thanks for taking my questions, and hope you're all doing well. Wanted to ask on the new product you introduced on the carrier service. Maybe you can just tell us about how the monetization model for that works? And is there an opportunity to expand that to more retailers?

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes. So the product is an add-on product for fulfillment and it's a modest monthly fee, and it does two things. One, it greatly simplifies the whole process of tying your ASN to your shipping documents and also rate shopping. So it just simplifies that process and decreases the amount of manual effort, which is a great value.

So I think there are two big parts of it. One, it's a potential add-on for our customers, so we can get more money, but it's also a retention tool. And the fact that, obviously, the more value we can generate for our suppliers, the more likely they are to stay with us and makes it very difficult for them to go somewhere else. And, yes, we continue to build out the network, and we're building out the network as fast as people need the solution.

Again, it's a new solution. And we expect to have it to basically end in our entire retail network.

Matt Pfau -- William Blair and Company -- Analyst

Right. And then, I guess, just generally, there's going to be a lot of supply chain-related changes coming out of the pandemic. So how do you think about that in terms of creating additional opportunities for more products to be created for your portfolio?

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

Well, I think a lot of it, we are set up extremely well with product. Obviously, you see more usage, you see more opportunities. But I think we're seeing dropship activities kind of double, triple overall. Now for some, retailers are up 200%; for some, retailers are up 1,000%.

So we're seeing significantly more -- obviously, more dropship opportunities of the 350 or so retailers that use us for drop shipping or the suppliers that use us for dropshipping. So we're seeing more opportunity there. We're seeing one of the dynamics that happened in 2009 -- remember 2009 was a very challenging retail environment and our community product actually had increased sales and we would public off our 2009 numbers. So we're seeing that the whole need for an efficient supply chain, electronic supply chain, simple things like going to the office to get mail or not wanting to have a packing slip on the box that comes in the distribution center because you don't want somebody to touch it.

So the efficiencies, we're very optimistic on that front. And I think we'll continue to evolve, but I think we're very well-positioned right now.

Matt Pfau -- William Blair and Company -- Analyst

Great. Thanks for taking my questions, guys.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Scott Berg from Needham.

Scott Berg -- Needham and Company -- Analyst

Hi, Kim. Congrats on a good quarter. And thanks for taking my questions. I guess a couple here, Archie.

You started touching on it in the last question a little bit, some differences between the Great Recession and the current environment that we're in. What else is different for the business today? Obviously, you're in more of a hyper-growth mode though still very early in the fulfillment at the cloud kind of stage. Today, 12 years later, certainly more mature, you have a much different position in the ecosystem. What are the maybe puts and pulls that are kind of different or other positives that you're looking at today?

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

Well, I think there's a couple of things. One, in 2008, 2009, there was no health crisis. It wasn't an emotional time. It wasn't as much of a time for empathy.

So that's completely different. And then we had everybody in the office. And so we didn't have 1,500 people working remotely across the globe. And there's some positives and some negatives with that.

So those are -- and like 2008, 2009, we didn't know how long in economics we're going to last. We, again, don't know how this is going to play out either. Is this a V? Is it a W? How long does it take? I don't know. Our business is very different.

In 2009, we only had very small suppliers and we only had a community. And the dynamic there we saw was that we saw a community need and we were a little flat-footed, increased pretty drastically. And we saw bankruptcies tick up a point or two that cost us a point or two on revenue. But 2009 actually was a year of accelerating growth.

What we didn't have, we also didn't have analytics, and we didn't have any enterprise accounts tied to ERP systems. So that business just didn't exist for us. So we don't really have a track record of knowing what's going to happen there. Pipelines look reasonable.

They look good, but I don't know how they're going to behave. Are the pipelines going to behave in a normal way? Or when we come to quarter end, are things going to get pushed? That's the biggest unknown for us and then bankruptcies and when our stores are going to open, obviously, is a big deal for us as well.

Scott Berg -- Needham and Company -- Analyst

Got it. Very helpful. And can you just kind of touch on pipelines right now and how they behave? I know second quarter is seasonally a very important quarter in terms of enablement campaign through customer additions, obviously, as retailers and suppliers try to ramp for the holiday season in the second half. I assume that's what you're commenting on specifically on enablement campaigns? And if not, is there maybe anything different in that comment?

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

I think it's more around the entire pipelines around analytics and around the deals tied with channel sales and ERP systems and more enterprise deals. Remember that the retail community program is -- one of the strong parts of our business model is the community. I don't know that could accelerate, it could decelerate. The good news is about -- a meaningful part of our enablement campaigns are just day-to-day supplier adds for Costco and Grainger and Loblaw and people are on different sectors.

So I'm probably less certain around the enterprise and analytics. Just don't know how that's going to behave through this, especially with store closings.

Scott Berg -- Needham and Company -- Analyst

Great. I'll hop back in the queue. Congrats, again.

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

Thanks.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Tom Roderick from Stifel.

Tom Roderick -- Stifel Financial Corp. -- Analyst

I guess I'll start by saying congratulations on a full 10 years as a public company. It's been a pretty wild ride coming out of the 2009 recession and now doing your 41st call or 41st quarter under the circumstances we're in. So I'm glad you're safe and healthy and hopefully just doing reasonably sane. I'd love to chat a little bit about just some of the state as you look at your customers and how they're weathering the storm.

As we look at average recurring revenue at kind of $8,500, between $8,000 and $9,000 per customer per year, that sort of hints at the nature of a lot of small and midsized suppliers, yet your churn rate has always been quite low. So I guess it's an opportunity for you to perhaps reflect on what you saw happen with the churn rate in 2009 and how you think about it in the context of today, where some of those suppliers might be getting choked off by supply chain challenges or some of the stores they're servicing are having challenges. Take us through how you think about the health of the installed base and how you're kind of stress testing and the thoughts about churn right now?

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

Sure. So we have around 31,000 recurring revenue customers. So we have a lot of sort of, do you want to say, about depth and breadth throughout our network, broad penetration in virtually all the areas of retail with no customer being a significant portion of the revenue. So that's one thing to keep in mind, that's a positive.

The other thing that I would say is if you think about our fulfillment product, what we are doing for our suppliers is mission-critical. So what that means is if you're a supplier and let's say that more of the sales had gone to bricks and mortar, but in light of the pandemic, more sales are going online. While they still need our products and services and we're there to make sure we can help and support them. So in that case, because we are that mission-critical product, they're still utilizing the fulfillment product.

They just may be utilizing it in this time slightly different, meaning more of the business, to state the obvious, is skewed more online than to stores where many stores, as we know, are certainly closed temporarily. So I think that, that's one thing to keep in mind, that product that we have. It's a very, again, mission-critical, very sticky product, and it's just how they're using us that is changing. The unknowns are really for how long are stores going to be closed.

And another unknown associated with that is as it impacts us from a bankruptcy perspective. So as Archie mentioned, in 2008, 2009, we did see an increase in bankruptcies. Thus far, we have not seen an uptick in bankruptcies or churn. In Q1, we're still at sort of that annualized 13% customer churn.

So we have not yet seen that. But we don't know what that's going to look like going forward. And again, I think that that's partially going to be driven by and dependent on how long stores are closed. But hopefully, that helps provide when we think about sort of that stickiness of that fulfillment product and the importance that, that product still is offering and delivering to our end customers.

Tom Roderick -- Stifel Financial Corp. -- Analyst

Yes. That's great. And Archie, just one more question for you on the go to market. You guys have always done a really nice job with the low-touch sales model and embracing inside sales and converting customers very quickly.

That is a channel that every company has now tried to raise for given the nature of how employees have to sell from home and sell over the web. Is that channel getting more crowded? Is that a tougher way to breakthrough? Any ways that you're sort of moderating or managing the go to market now in light of the fact that sort of everyone is chasing after the model you guys have really perfected over the years?

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

Well, I think one drastic thing about -- difference about our model is when our supplier sales reps are calling a supplier to try to sell them on our product, I have a big retailer behind the scenes with the merchandising telling them they need to return our calls and threatening to perhaps stop doing business with them if they don't return our calls. So that field isn't very crowded. Again, our close rates are anywhere between 60% and 95% on those community deals. Not always recurring revenue, but either a testing contract or recurring revenue.

Most companies are looking to get, from an inside sales team, a 1% to 2% close rate. That would be a home run. So yes and no. I mean, the fact is our salespeople are truly salespeople.

They're not cold-calling. So working from home has been -- our sales team, hats off to them, they have stayed incredibly focused and have really done a great job because remember, some of these Costco suppliers, they're looking to onboard them like seven minutes ago. And we're literally onboarding suppliers within hours, sometimes less than an hour when the industry norm is weeks if not months.

Tom Roderick -- Stifel Financial Corp. -- Analyst

Yes. Got it. Fantastic. I'll jump back in the queue.

But again, nice job, and look forward to seeing you all. Take care.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Joe Vruwink from Baird.

Joe Vruwink -- Baird -- Analyst

Great. Hello, everyone. You've kind of been touching on this, but I was wondering if you could characterize maybe where EDI is falling and the pecking order of broader retail IT projects. When I think of what you provide, it's a lot of value for a fairly low price point.

So I would imagine that's the type of thing that might actually have more interest in this type of environment. But I'd be curious for your thoughts.

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Thank you. First off, we're fairly new in the pandemic world. Right? I mean it's really been about six weeks.

So we have six weeks of data and with a typically longer sales cycles. Early signs are positive. And what we found, again, trying to relate it back to 2009, and your guess is as good as mine, whether we're going to see a similar pattern. But one of the things that happened in 2009 is retailers didn't have massive capital spend projects.

They weren't building new distribution centers. They weren't doing new ERP systems. Our product sale to a retailer, we need commitment from the retailer but not dollars. So we moved up the priority rank for a retailer.

And that's what we're hoping to see here, and it's a very foundational nature. Frankly, the stay at home for retailers, for their back-office being at home, all of a sudden, the pain of manual processes is really, really felt. The time and effort and everything else. And distribution centers needing spacing, you need to be more efficient and more automated there.

So I think that part of the business, I am extremely optimistic, and that's a part of the business we'll lean into and rely on. And that, frankly, if you look at the rest of our competitors, that is the go-to-market strategy they don't have. So from a market share standpoint, we think we're extremely set up well over the next year or decade years to have a go-to-market strategy that's been extremely successful that frankly, our competitors don't have.

Joe Vruwink -- Baird -- Analyst

That's great. And speaking of pain points, there's a lot of anecdotes right now in listening to some of your supplier customers on how they just like more visibility on sell-through or how tight is inventory getting at the point of final demand and that specifically seems to be happening in the U.S. So that begs the question on the analytics product. And I understand why, as a category, that might be something that it makes sense to be a little more cautious on just given the environment.

But when you think about, again, the pain points and what suppliers are now asking for, could that actually see a bit of a benefit once, let's say, conditions return to normal and you get a shot to maybe make the analytics pitch again?

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes. I think once we get back to "normal," then yes. Right now, we're concerned with store closings because you're getting point of sales data by store. And if stores are closed, that's not really interesting to know what's moving at a store that's closed.

So that puts pressure on it. The other thing that can put pressure on it is that it is a "discretionary spend" as opposed to our fulfillment. If somebody wants to cancel our service, our fulfillment service with Costco, that means they have to just stop getting their purchase orders from Costco or hire somebody else. They're not going to go without it.

So it's a little more discretionary spend. But the value to the suppliers and the retailers is tremendous. And I think it will become more tremendous. It's just a matter of just being cautious and understanding in the short term.

Stores are closed and people are looking for cost savings. And to spend $1 to save $2 in the future right now is a tougher sell.

Joe Vruwink -- Baird -- Analyst

Great.

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you very much.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Patrick Walravens from JMP.

Patrick Walravens -- JMP Securities -- Analyst

Oh, great. Thank you. And I also want to congratulate you guys on your 10-year public company anniversary. Incredibly, my model actually seems to go back to 2008.

So it's -- I know, I know. Scary. Right? So here's what it looks like. And hopefully, if it's wrong, Kim, you tell me.

So in Q2 '08, recurring revenue grew 27%, and then it decelerated for five quarters. So it went 27%, 25%, 20%, 19%, 17%, 16% and then in Q4 '09 popped up to 21% and you were off to the races. And just as a reminder for everyone, the low point from an economic growth perspective was Q4 of '08 when it was down about 8%. So tough question, I know, but five quarters of deceleration, is that a reasonable assumption for us to use?

Kim Nelson -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

So as it relates to -- there may have been an acquisition there lapping, in fact, in 2008. But to answer your broader question, we have visibility into Q2, and we provided our view as it relates to Q2. As it relates to the remainder of the year, we did withdraw our annual guidance just because there is a lot of uncertainty there relative to a lot of the dynamics that we've talked about, right? So there are some things that put pressure on it as it relates to the timing of store closures, bankruptcies, analytics, potential some of the enterprise ERP. There are also positives as it relates to the community.

And so because of a lot of uncertainty and the fact that we pulled, our view at this point, hopefully, next quarter, we'll be in a position to be able to provide more visibility. That would be really difficult to provide a view of what that may look like. So, again, you have the dip point in Q2. Q2, our guidance is to revenue below Q1 from a growth rate perspective, but that would be really difficult to answer for how long and what that actually looks like.

I do think that it will be somewhat correlated relating to how long stores are closed.

Patrick Walravens -- JMP Securities -- Analyst

OK. Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Jason Celino from KeyBanc Capital Markets.

Jason Celino -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Morning, Kim. Thanks for taking my questions. Really just one kind of housekeeping type question. Given the examples of kind of the grocery store businesses and the suppliers tied to that segment, but can you help us quantify how much of your business is that segment or how to think about it?

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

I think the best way to think about it is we're in grocery, e-commerce, brick and mortar, industrial distribution. And we're probably not that far off from the general retail segment in North America as a whole. So obviously, grocery is a meaningful part. And grocery can be Costco.

Right? Costco has got a meaningful grocery business. So I would think it's fairly -- when we look at it, it'd be fairly along the lines of the overall retail market with some segments being smaller. We would just have a smaller part of our business. But we're across all segments and pretty equally distributed, I mean, anywhere from grocery to e-commerce to pet supplies and each one has its own dynamics.

Jason Celino -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

OK. Great. Thank you.

Operator

Our next question comes from the line of Tyler Wood from Northland.

Tyler Wood -- Northland Securities -- Analyst

Hey. Thanks for taking our question. Just one for me. On the suppliers on the network, could you kind of give us a sense of the share of those that are kind of just tied to one retailer and could potentially leave the network if retail bankruptcy were to occur? And then sort of how are you preparing for that possibility when it comes to ensuring that suppliers don't churn in that scenario?

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes. So here's the way I'll talk about it. The average is $9,100, but we really have three meaningful -- we're not -- we don't give the exact percentage, but three meaningful types of customers. Obviously, there's a bell curve around that $9,100, and then there's a meaningful number of customers.

For customer count, it's the highest number. But from a dollar standpoint, an equal weighting or an important weighting of customers that use us for one or two retailers. And then we have a meaningful 1,500, 1,800 customers that pay us $20,000 to multiple hundreds of thousands. The No.

1 thing is if they only use us for one connection. That is our -- where we lose the most customers far and away, that they stop doing business with the one retailer. And our strategy is the same as it's always been. We try to get them using our product.

And to the extent, they have another retailer that perhaps isn't pushing them but will allow them to do EDI that they see the value in SBS and attempt to use us for more than one, but that's always the case. And they tend to be the smallest customers.

Tyler Wood -- Northland Securities -- Analyst

That's helpful. Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Mark Schappel from Benchmark.

Unknown speaker

Hey. Thanks for taking my question. It's Chad on for Mark. With respect to M&A, there are several private EDI vendors in the marketplace today.

Many of them are in the $5 million to $20 million range. And many of them are either breakeven or marginally profitable. Given the recent retail disruptions, do you see more of these vendors looking for an exit strategy through M&A?

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

This is pure speculation because, again, we're only six weeks into this. So there's not an immediate reaction. And I think the answer could be yes. If they can survive, they might want to think that their value is going to come back.

So you're always going to fight that. And I would guess that's the same in every M&A category. But the question is, for many of these smaller EDI suppliers is, can they weather the storm economically? Do they have a true cloud-based infrastructure that is reliable that they can handle the loads and do the work and what does their sales process look like? So we think that many of our competitors are going to have a tough time through this and are not set up the way SPS Commerce is both from a technology and financially. So, yes.

We're trying to make sure that we're there and that they're aware of us and that we're building the relationships. And hopefully, we can buy them. It can be a little more challenging right now because your exposure to different industries would be very important right now with an M&A discussion. Obviously, if you're all grocery, we feel pretty good about it, at least today.

And if you're all high-priced fashion, it's pretty challenging right now. So there's probably a little extra layer of due diligence in an M&A deal, but I think there could be an opportunity going forward there.

Unknown speaker

OK. Great.

Operator

[Operator instructions] Your next question comes from the line of Jeff Van Rhee from Craig-Hallum Capital Group.

Rudy Kessinger -- Craig-Hallum Capital Group LLC -- Analyst

Hey, guys. This is Rudy on for Jeff. With the June guide, I mean, sure, you guys took some caution on it. Which were the first areas you've sort of haircut a little based on what you're seeing and then what you think you'll see throughout the rest of the quarter?

Kim Nelson -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

So as it relates to the Q2 revenue guidance that we gave, that was based on what we're seeing thus far in the quarter as well as the pipeline. So we'll look at our sort of existing customers as well as upsell opportunities and new customers and a lot of the new work comes as we look at the community enablement activity in the quarter. So we take all of that into account and then we provide what we believe is appropriate guidance based on what we see in the pipeline as well as with our existing customers.

Rudy Kessinger -- Craig-Hallum Capital Group LLC -- Analyst

Got it. And if you could just think back to 2008, 2009. I know currently, the customer churn is about 12%, 13%. If you look back 2008, 2009, do you guys have any details on what percentage of your customers maybe went bankrupt or what the customer churn increased to?

Kim Nelson -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. It was a couple of percent on the customer churn at about 1% on the dollar or higher back then.

Rudy Kessinger -- Craig-Hallum Capital Group LLC -- Analyst

Got it. Great. Very helpful. OK.

Great. Thank you.

Operator

[Operator signoff]

Duration: 44 minutes

Call participants:

Irmina Blaszczyk -- Managing Director, The Blueshirt Group

Archie Black -- Chief Executive Officer

Kim Nelson -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Matt Pfau -- William Blair and Company -- Analyst

Scott Berg -- Needham and Company -- Analyst

Tom Roderick -- Stifel Financial Corp. -- Analyst

Joe Vruwink -- Baird -- Analyst

Patrick Walravens -- JMP Securities -- Analyst

Jason Celino -- KeyBanc Capital Markets -- Analyst

Tyler Wood -- Northland Securities -- Analyst

Unknown speaker

Rudy Kessinger -- Craig-Hallum Capital Group LLC -- Analyst

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