Logo of jester cap with thought bubble.

Image source: The Motley Fool.

BellRing Brands, Inc. (NYSE:BRBR)
Q1 2021 Earnings Call
Feb 05, 2021, 10:30 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:


Operator

Welcome to BellRing Brands first-quarter 2021 earnings conference call and webcast. Hosting the call today from BellRing Brands are Darcy Davenport, president and chief executive officer; and Paul Rode, chief financial officer. Today's call is being recorded and will be available for replay beginning at 1:30 P.M. Eastern Time.

The dial-in number is 800-585-8367 and the passcode is 1876009. [Operator instructions] It is now my pleasure to turn the floor over to Jennifer Meyerr, investor relations of BellRing Brands for introductions. You may begin.

Jennifer Meyerr -- Investor Relations

Good morning, and thank you for joining us today for BellRing Brands' first-quarter fiscal 2021 earnings call. With me today are Darcy Davenport, our president and CEO; and Paul Rode, our CFO. Darcy and Paul will begin with prepared remarks, and afterwards we'll have a brief question-and-answer session. The press release and supplemental slide presentation that supports these remarks are posted on our website in both the Investor Relations and the SEC Filings section at bellring.com.

In addition, the release and slides are available on the SEC's website. Before we continue, I would like to remind you that this call will contain forward-looking statements, which are subject to risks and uncertainties that should be carefully considered by investors as actual results could differ materially from these statements. These forward-looking statements are current as of the date of this call and management undertakes no obligation to update these statements. As a reminder, this call is being recorded and an audio replay will be available on our website.

And finally, this call will discuss certain non-GAAP measures. For a reconciliation of these non-GAAP measures to the nearest GAAP measure, see our press release issued yesterday and posted on our website. With that, I will turn the call over to Darcy.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Jennifer, and thank you, all, for joining us this morning. Last evening we reported our first-quarter results, as well as, posted a supplemental presentation to our website. The presentation provides more insight into our business, consumption, and key metrics. I'm pleased to report that our fiscal 2021 is off to a good start with net sales of $282 million and adjusted EBITDA of $61 million, slightly above our internal estimates.

Net sales were up 16% with Premier Protein and Dymatize both growing double digits. As you saw in our press release, we affirmed our sales and adjusted EBITDA guidance for the full year. The quarterly cadence is largely as expected with some minor tweaks. First, we slightly overperformed both sales and adjusted EBITDA in the first quarter mainly due to a shift in sales from the second quarter.

Second, inflation ramped up in the middle of the first quarter. We have done a good job with our cost-out strategy and have been able to offset a portion of these headwinds. But given the expected surge in freight and additional milk protein inflation, we announced a modest price increase in our shake business starting in Q3. We will experience continued margin pressure in Q2 until the price increase is implemented, but we are confident in our full-year guidance.

Now turning to our category, brand highlights, and growth strategies. The overall convenient nutrition category remains stable. Growth in liquids and powders accelerated this quarter and are running above pre-COVID growth rates. The adult and everyday nutrition segments are driving this growth as consumers are increasingly focused on their general health.

Most of the increased penetration is coming from everyday nutrition, while growth in adult is primarily the same consumers buying more. Powders are also seeing some strong momentum resulting from increased at-home consumption. Premier Protein shake consumption grew meaningfully this quarter, up 28% across tracked and untracked channels. Growth was broad-based and accelerated in nearly all channels when compared to prior quarter and a year ago.

Healthy velocities, strong distribution gains and incremental promotions drove this growth. Food and eCommerce channels led the way, up 69% and 121% respectively. This strong momentum has continued in Q2 with our first four weeks showing 17% growth across tracked and untracked channels, with impressive gains in food, mass, and eCommerce. We continue to make great progress against our growth strategies.

Premier Protein's household penetration reached 7%, an increase of 19% over prior year. Our distribution continues to build with brand TDPs up 17% sequentially, reflecting our Q1 shelf gain. In January, we kicked off our national marketing campaign, which includes TV, digital and social media. We complemented our proven strategy of having real fans explain why they love our shakes, with spots focused on our key differentiator: amazing taste.

In the first few weeks of the campaign, our results are encouraging, with search and website traffic exceeding the same period last year. Our new flavors and pack sizes are driving significant growth. Café Latte, now in its second year; and Cinnamon Roll, our newest flavor are performing in the top 15% of the category were sold. Our upsizing initiative is off to a great start with our new 12 count driving almost three quarters of our growth in the mass channel.

Premier is also growing outside of shakes, with powders up 129% driven by distribution and velocity. Dymatize had another strong quarter, up 35% domestically, with growth across all key channels. Distribution in FDM grew 38% since prior quarter with strong product expansion in the mass channel. Our new ISO100 products, Fruity and Cocoa Pebbles, continue to be standouts driving velocity across all channels and securing significant new distribution.

Our international sales were flat year over year. Premier shakes in Canada showed meaningful increases, but softness across the rest of the portfolio offset this growth. The impact of COVID on the global specialty channel continues to affect the Dymatize and PowerBar brands. However, we expect this to slowly recover later this year.

I want to take a moment to discuss the business realignment we executed this quarter, which impacts both Dymatize and our international business. Over the last several years, there has become more overlap between Premier Protein and Dymatize in the US. As a result, we decided to combine the management of these two brands housed in Emeryville. As part of the realignment, we created a dedicated international team, who will drive growth across all of our brands outside the US.

Regrettably, these changes result in reductions across our workforce in Dallas and Germany. I believe this was a needed strategic step to position BellRing for the future, but these decisions are not made lightly, and I want to thank our employees for all the hard work and dedication over the past years. Overall, I remain confident in our 2021 outlook. Our supply chain performance is strong and our shake co-man network is well positioned to support our growth.

Our new creative is now running and our messaging is reaching more households. Our distribution gains are driving meaningful growth, and we are seeing strong brand blocks across most major retailers. Our new products are succeeding in market and our innovation pipeline is building, driving long-term value for the brand. I continue to be energized by our long runway for growth and now believe we have optimized our organizational structure to truly drive those growth strategies.

I will now turn the call over to Paul.

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Darcy, and good morning, everyone. Net sales for the quarter were $282.4 million, up 15.7%. Adjusted EBITDA was $60.7 million, up 3.6%, and EBITDA margin was 21.5%. Premier Protein net sales increased 17.4%, driven by RTD shakes.

First-quarter results benefited from distribution gains for both existing and new products, and incremental promotional activity. Dymatize net sales grew 16.2% this quarter driven by distribution gains in club and mass, and continued double-digit growth in eCommerce. International sales for Dymatize improved sequentially, but remained weak on a year-over-year basis as a result of COVID. Net sales of all other products decreased 11.2%.

Turning back to consolidated results. Gross profit of $91.9 million increased 0.7% this quarter with gross profit margin declining 490 basis points to 32.5%. The margin decline was largely as expected and related to higher input costs, primarily milk-based proteins and freight as well as incremental promotional activity. SG&A expenses were $38.3 million and as a percentage of net sales declined 140 basis points to 13.6%.

SG&A expenses in the current year included $4.6 million of restructuring and facility closure costs related to our business realignment that Darcy discussed earlier. These expenses were partially offset by $1.5 million of lower separation costs, both of which were treated as adjustments for non-GAAP measures. Excluding these items, SG&A was down approximately $1 million compared to prior year. And marketing spend was flat.

Before reviewing our outlook, I would like to make a few comments on cash flow and liquidity. We had a strong first quarter for cash flow generating $23 million from operations. At quarter end, we had $50.8 million of cash on hand and $150 million available under our revolver. As of December 31, net debt was $635 million and net leverage was 3.2 times.

Turning to our outlook. We continue to expect fiscal 2021 net sales of $1.07 billion to $1.12 billion and adjusted EBITDA of $207 million to $217 million. As Darcy previewed, our quarterly pacing is largely tracking with our expectations. However, first-half gross margins will be further pressured by higher freight costs before rebounding in the second half when our RTD shake pricing takes effect.

For the second quarter, recall that we will lap the prior-year COVID pantry loading benefit for Premier Protein, which is a headwind to our net sales and EBITDA growth, but a tailwind for our third quarter. In addition, our promotional activity and advertising investments will peak in Q2 as expected. Overall, we remain confident in our full-year estimates and are pleased with the top-line performance and distribution wins for Premier Protein and Dymatize. With that, I would like to turn the call back over to the Operator for your questions.

Questions & Answers:


Operator

Thank you. [Operator instructions] Our first question comes from the line of Ken Goldman of J.P. Morgan.

Ken Goldman -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

Hey, thank you, and I love the 11 minutes of prepared remarks. It's fantastic. So thank you for keeping it brief for everybody. I wanted to ask about the gross margin, which, of course, was down a significant amount this quarter for the third straight time.

I get it right? You're facing a spike in dairy and freight, you've been promoting some more in some channels. I'm just wondering because I think investors, and we certainly are guilty of this, have been modeling in much stronger gross margins. What can you tell us specifically? Is there any way you can quantify what your expectations are for that line for the next few quarters or just for the year, just in the name of sort of making sure that we don't get those negative surprises on that line item again?

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

Sure Ken. Good morning. I'll take that. Yes.

So coming into the year, we expected our gross margins to decline versus last year, because of -- especially the first half was impacted more so by protein cost, and we expected to continue to make brand investments and promotional spending. So we expected gross margins to decline versus last year. What has changed, obviously, is freight cost has increased. And so that's putting more pressure on our margins in the first half.

So, while overall for the year, we expect our margins to be down versus last year, we now expect that our second half should be above last year's gross margins because of the price increase, offsetting some of these costs. So, first half down; second half above last year. Keep in mind, our historical margins have been roughly around 34% with a spike in '19 because of the price increase we took at that point in time where they got a little bit above 34%, but historically, we've been about around there. So we -- we expect to get closer to that as we take the price increase going into next year.

Ken Goldman -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

Great. That is very helpful. Thank you. And then my follow-up, I'm curious what you experienced in terms of any pushback from your customers to the price announcement.

I would assume not much just given how transparent higher dairy and freight costs are, and given how there's not much elasticity in the market right now. But I just wanted to get any color I could from you on that? Thanks.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Customers, as you guys know, customers never like a price increase, but they absolutely understand why we're doing it. As you explained, they're seeing the same inflation as we are. So they understand it. And remember, we took price two years ago and everyone behaved very rationally.

,Customers reflected it. At-shelf elasticities were very close to our estimates, and so we expect the same this time.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Andrew Lazar of Barclays.

Andrew Lazar -- Barclays -- Analyst

Good morning everybody.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning.

Andrew Lazar -- Barclays -- Analyst

Hi. First off, I guess, with regard to Premier. I know price/mix was down about 4.5% as a result of some of the incremental promotional activity. I mean that as you mentioned was -- was part of the pressure on gross margins.

I guess, could you discuss a little bit how you evaluate the trade-offs between incremental revenue generated versus the margin pressure? And I guess more of the optics right of what -- some might call perhaps lower-quality growth or a reliance on promotion. And I guess put another way what gives you the confidence that the incremental promotional spend is and continues to be an effective use of funds?

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

So our focus as we have walked you guys through is building household penetration. We continue to believe that that is the biggest driver of long-term value and growth for specifically Premier Protein. We knew we were going to -- one of the strategies to increase household pen is raising marketing and promotion this year to drive that. We know that once we get trial on this brand because of our repeat rates that are over 50%, we will have a loyal consumer.

So as we -- if you look at 2021 promos they are actually very similar to '20 except for we tested an incremental club promotion in Q1 which is what you're seeing in the numbers. But other than that they're actually fairly consistent with some -- as you guys know we have our bigger push in Q2 and Q4 and then we added the Q1 promotion as well.

Andrew Lazar -- Barclays -- Analyst

Great. OK. Thank you for that. And then, Paul, you mentioned heading into the first quarter it was expected that pretty much all of the EBITDA growth in fiscal 2021 would occur in the second half.

And obviously you had 3.5% growth that you realized in EBITDA in the first quarter. And obviously fiscal 2Q is anticipated to be down to off -- I guess is 2Q anticipated to be down to basically offset this so that you still kind of have that same cadence of virtually all the EBITDA growth in the second half? And then similarly on sales I mean it was expected sales in the first half will be up high single digit. Obviously, first quarter was up far greater than that. If it was to hold to the first half guidance that you initially gave on sales, that would imply a deceleration in sales to maybe minus one to plus three in the second quarter.

But given you have so much momentum I don't know if that still holds. So anyway, I'm just trying to put this in perspective, what you did in the first quarter based on what your initial sort of first-half guidance was if you get my drift?

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, I think I do. So our thinking on first-half growth is still -- is still in line with our original expectation. I think Darcy touched on in her prepared remarks that we did see a little bit of a shift into Q1 versus Q2. So we just -- whenever you're loading these large promotions, sometimes they load a bit differently than you expect.

So what we believe we've seen is a bit of a pull in Q1 a little harder than expected. So that obviously falls out in Q2. And then with the freight headwinds obviously that puts some additional pressure on our second quarter as well. So we really think our -- our first half is largely intact.

There's just a little bit of a shift between the first and second quarter. No -- no concerns about the sequential revenue top line.

Andrew Lazar -- Barclays -- Analyst

OK. Thanks so much to you both.

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Brian Holland of D.A. Davidson.

Brian Holland -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

Yeah, thanks. Good morning. So I wanted to probe that -- this implied Q2 growth a little bit further. It sounds like I guess that some of that pull-in from Q2 is maybe related to that club promotion that you referenced.

But I'm just curious if there's anything -- I mean obviously, there's something at the end of the quarter here when we start to lap the initial demand surge around COVID. I mean is that just something where you feel like you don't have enough visibility on, so why not just stick with the same cadence through the first half and stay on that lapse? Because -- or is there something else in one of these channels that we need to be mindful of? Because again, you're accelerating in scanner through January that ran concurrent with the promotion at Costco, so no cannibalization there. So it seems like a lot of momentum going into that second half of March. So anything that we should be mindful of other than just -- maybe just trying to be mindful of the COVID comp?

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

Certainly, as we're lapping last year -- yeah, the COVID comp was a big tailwind for us in the second quarter of last year. I think we previously estimated that the high single digit. It drove high single-digit growth for us last year that we're obviously lapping. So that does obviously weigh on your growth rates from last year to this year.

Regarding the business momentum we do feel like it's still strong. There's nothing that I've seen or we've seen that would suggest that there's any reasons for concern. But everything we've seen from a revenue side has been tracking to our expectation again with just a bit of a shift from Q1 into Q2.

Brian Holland -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

I'm sorry, Paul just to -- yeah, Paul just to confirm that, you said high single-digit contribution from, sort of, the COVID demand surge in Q2, that's how much that contributed?

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

That's what it contributed to last year so that would be the headwind for this year. So that's the flip between Q2 and Q3 where it's a headwind in Q2 and a tailwind for Q3.

Brian Holland -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

Understood. And then if I could just ask a big picture question. I think relative to three months, six months ago, it feels like we'll be in something similar to the dynamic that's in place today as it pertains to consumer mobility, which obviously has been beneficial to the category in your business in particular. But if we extrapolate that out further there's forecast out there that would suggest two times the American workforce will be working from home in some form five years from now versus pre-COVID.

So Darcy, I'm just wondering if you have done any work on that, any analysis and if there's reason to kind of rethink the opportunity here just given the relative convenience of shakes versus bars at home and obviously when we look at the penetration growth and the repeat rates on your business in particular. I'm just curious if you have any point on that.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. We're incredibly excited about our momentum as a business. Because not only, yes, we have the negative of the mobility, but we have the positive of I mean, we -- I walked through the category and liquids and powders are -- in the last 13 weeks are double the growth of the overall category. So we're seeing the tailwinds of just general health.

And the sentiment of consumers of really being worried about their general health and what they can do personally to improve that. So we've got that tailwind. And I think that's long-term, I think -- and I think obviously it got accelerated with the pandemic. But I think that will stay front and center for a while.

And so then you take that and then you put -- you layer on top the increase of mobility and that we are a convenience product, I think, we look forward and see a lot of encouraging signs.

Brian Holland -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

Appreciate the color. Best of luck.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Chris Growe of Stifel.

Chris Growe -- Stifel Financial Corp. -- Analyst

Hi. Good morning.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning.

Chris Growe -- Stifel Financial Corp. -- Analyst

Good morning. I just had a question for you if I could. First on just to understand -- maybe I can better understand the fact that this quarter had a promotional load-in. And as I look at the charts and the data, I guess, I was still -- a little stump still on how with consumption being up so strongly for Premier of 27.5%, and obviously, revenues and volume for that business being up less than that just how that dynamic worked.

And maybe more importantly, how much should come out of Q2 as a result of that load-in that occurred in the first quarter?

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. So I'll take the latter part of your question there. So our thinking is that we've seen maybe a 1% to 2% pull forward Q1 -- from Q2 into Q1. So it's not big, but it does impact obviously the growth rates a bit.

So that would be that part of your question. Yes. I mean, our first quarter is typically a very heavy shipments to consumption quarter because all of the January promotions that are going on a lot of them do load for us in the first quarter. So -- and there's a chart in our supplemental that obviously, shows that dynamic.

And it's fairly consistent with last year. It was up a bit maybe from last year which is part of that pull forward that we're talking about, but it's not meaningfully different from last year's pull-in.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. I think what I would add is that, in on-track we did see the -- we had some ship-in volume in Q4 that we saw the consumption in Q1 which is I think -- which is the delta between the consumption and the shipments as well.

Chris Growe -- Stifel Financial Corp. -- Analyst

OK. Thank you for that. And to follow up on that, but I -- I understand what you're saying. Just a quick second question would be just to get a sense of how much the inflation outlook has changed for the year.

And then can you give any color around the degree of the price increase you're taking? And maybe that will help dimensionalize the increase in cost?

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

Darcy, let me take the inflation piece and then you can --

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Sure.

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

Yes. From an inflation perspective, the change from our original estimate which is primarily freight is that it will be a 75 to 100-basis-point drag on the year. So that's the magnitude of the freight impact which has ramped up really kind of late in our first quarter.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

And then from a pricing standpoint just for competitive reasons, I don't think we're going to -- I'm not going to go into the exact price increase but it's modest and similar to what we took two years ago.

Chris Growe -- Stifel Financial Corp. -- Analyst

OK. And then just to be clear on that, Paul, that inflation that 75 to 100-basis-point drag on the gross margins is that the way that you were quantifying that?

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

That is exactly right.

Chris Growe -- Stifel Financial Corp. -- Analyst

OK. Thanks so much for your time.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Tim Perz of Stephens Inc.

Tim Perz -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Good morning. Congrats on the nice quarter.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Tim Perz -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

So how should we expect you to approach marketing spend this year? I know you plan to advertise on TV for an additional three months this year. But if you achieve your household penetrations kind of like ahead of time, would you be more inclined to drive margins by pulling back on marketing spend in the back half? Or do you kind of plan to stick to that goal and pursue additional households this year?

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. We plan to continue with our plan from an advertising standpoint. Big picture is we are under -- we believe we are underpenetrated. And so we know our marketing is working.

We're seeing early results. First of all, it worked last year to drive household penetration. We made some changes just to optimize it this year. And in early first three weeks, we see that it is more effective than even last year.

So we believe it is the right way to build long-term value for the business and we think there's a lot of upside. So we're absolutely continuing on the path to spend to acquiring household.

Tim Perz -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

OK. Thank you. And Premier Protein household penetration was up about 18% year-over-year but your consumption exceeded that. So can you just talk a little bit about what you're seeing from the buying rate among existing consumers and what's driving that higher?

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. So about 80 -- let's see if I'm going to get to your question. About 80% of our growth is coming from outside the category and it's a combination of new households and buy rate. Two of our -- from a strategy standpoint our goal this year was twofold: household penetration and buy rate.

And so from a household penetration standpoint, we are increasing our marketing and our promotion as well as -- and then from a buy rate and coming out with new products, new flavors, et cetera. And then from a buy rate standpoint, we have our upsize initiative. So those combination is where you're seeing kind of -- you see the increase of household pen but then you see the buy rate as well.

Tim Perz -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

OK. Thank you. I'll pass it on.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Bill Chappell of Truist Securities.

Bill Chappell -- Truist Securities -- Analyst

Thanks, good morning.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning.

Bill Chappell -- Truist Securities -- Analyst

I just want to go back to just the freight issue. I'm just trying to understanding -- I imagine you have some freight contracts where you don't see the immediate hit as freight costs rise. And so I guess trying to understand since it is -- just as you said it crept up late in the first quarter and immediately hitting in the second quarter, what ways to prevent that from as they -- if they creep up again in the second quarter that you haven't priced enough for that as we go into the third quarter? Just trying to understand kind of what visibility you have on your freight rates? And what kind of -- in order to price -- this doesn't happen again and again as we move through the year and things start to open up?

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

Sure. Yeah. We do have obviously some visibility into our freight costs through our providers. But it really did move up quite a bit.

And I think you've seen that obviously inflation with other companies as well with COVID causing some shortages with drivers. But the really long-term thinking is that that will continue on for a period of time. But to your point, there obviously is always risk that it goes up and there's opportunities should it come down. But we feel like we've looked at the rest of the year and looked at it at this elevated level as we thought about the impact to our business for the rest of the year.

Bill Chappell -- Truist Securities -- Analyst

So, I mean just your thought is, freight rates have peaked? Or you priced for the potential peak? Is that fair?

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes.

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

The expectation, yes.

Bill Chappell -- Truist Securities -- Analyst

OK. And then just a follow-up, just any color on channels? I mean is it safe to say, club versus non-club performed at a similar rate? Or I mean, it did seem like you had more promotions? And obviously more new product introductions in the club channel. Any color there would be helpful. Thanks.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So, Oh, sorry.

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

No. Go ahead. I was just going to clarify, if he meant Premier or total BellRing or both.Bill ChappellYes. I meant, Premier, sorry.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So Premier, on track, still for the quarter, overall our consumption was up 27.5%. It was led by untracked. So untracked still was tracking ahead and driving the growth over track, so up about 43%.

And track being up 15%. And it was -- we're having really -- we continue to have really solid growth in eCommerce. We did have a promotion in eCommerce, which drove some of that, which again was expected. And then, we're seeing solid growth in untracked club.

And then, -- but, I will say, I think some of the areas that, I'm most excited about is, our progress are in food -- specifically food and mass and getting more products on the shelf and really getting that brand block, which is something that we haven't had before. And we're seeing it in market.

Bill Chappell -- Truist Securities -- Analyst

Great. Thank you.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Jason English of Goldman Sachs.

Jason English -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Hey, good morning, folks.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Jason.

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

Good morning.

Jason English -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

I guess I've got two quick questions. Well, maybe not quick, but the first one is. How much of the growth in Dymatize is coming from these Pebbles extensions? And should we really look at these as almost like a license, in and out? Or do you think there's reason to believe that could actually have durability?

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

So I don't have the exact number for Pebbles but what -- but I'll separate out the growth -- the domestic growth from a distribution and velocity standpoint. So, about 60% of the growth was coming from distribution and about 40% from velocity. A lot of that velocity is coming from Pebbles and the excitement there. So -- and it's really coming across channels.

We absolutely think it has durability. And I think that you'll start seeing -- I think the excitement around -- I think, I've explained the consumer insight to this piece. It's not just about borrowed equity. There -- it is steeped in solid consumer insight that basically says that, the Dymatize consumer is, starved of carbs.

And so basically hasn't eaten sugary cereals but in a long time and love it. And so, because our product delivers so well on the Fruity and Cocoa Pebble experience, it really is kind of scratching that itch. And so, that is a consumer insight that can be really built upon.

Jason English -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Interesting. Second question, you've got a great organic growth story here. And I'm not asking you to muddy the waters. But I do recall when you guys were initially spinning out and standing this business up on a stand-alone basis, part of the rationale was to be able to have a high multiple business that could acquire other high-multiple businesses on the growth assets.

Where is M&A on your agenda today? And have you seen any opportunities, perhaps open up during COVID?

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. I think you highlighted and described it well. We do believe. And we've communicated this, that we are excited.

The organic growth of specifically Premier, but also Dymatize is our number one priority. And we still think there's a ton of upside. And that really is our focus. And just to jump, we've -- historically we've talked more about Premier, as being the driver of that, which it will be.

But I think the recent momentum on Dymatize really gets us excited about that growth story as well. And so, that puts us in a situation where M&A is absolutely one of our growth strategy. But it becomes more of a nice to have, as opposed to a need to have, which allows us to pick and choose and wait for the right opportunity as opposed to being forced to buy something, because we're trying to hold up a growth rate.

Jason English -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Makes sense. Thanks a lot. I'll pass it on.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Rob Dickerson of Jefferies.

Rob Dickerson -- Jefferies -- Analyst

All right. Great. Thank you so much. Darcy yesterday a larger food company who doesn't really focus specifically on protein shakes bars powders stated that seemed like your discussions with retailers and kind of what they've seen on the shelf, let's say, in the past six months would suggest that maybe there's been a little bit more shelf allocated to kind of shakes and powders, right? Just given kind of the adult consumption shift, maybe there's a less attraction for the time being, at least, just to the more on-the-go bars.

And then they stated, though, that also through those conversations with the retailers that they would think that some of that would reverse back out, right? So maybe there's almost a bit temporary mix adjustment, obviously, to cater to where demand is. So I just thought I'd ask, kind of, if that's what you're seeing too, if you agree with that, kind of, what your perspective is. And really would there be so much shift? Because it seems like your shift has been driven by good product and distribution gain, increased GDPs not off a COVID, kind of, was already planned. But then there's kind of the other commentary that it's the overlay of kind of what's happening within the broader category, if we think about the mix between powders and shakes, vis-a-vis, bars, if that makes sense.

Thanks.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

It does make sense. I agree with the fact that we're seeing some shift of shelf space from bars to RTDs and powders. I have not heard that, that is a temporary change. I guess I look at it as, retailers keep -- I mean, very simply retailers keep items that are growing and are growing their category.

And so, as I've just said, 80% of our growth is coming from outside of the category. We actually have very little growth that is coming from shifting among the category. So -- and we're one of the highest velocity products in the category. So I haven't heard it.

And honestly I -- it doesn't worry me from a Premier standpoint or a Dymatize standpoint, for that matter.

Rob Dickerson -- Jefferies -- Analyst

OK, great. And then, I guess, just as quickly, obviously, the focus right now is building the core, right? There's a long runway of growth still on the current product offerings or categories as you just stated. There's the new Premier cereal, right? Just, we've seen the innovation already come out. We've discussed earlier on the post-call.

Are you thinking already kind of like where can we take Premier, right? Let's -- we have kind of the plan in place in terms of the distribution strategy and with the right offerings we just need to execute. So maybe there's a little bit more bandwidth in terms of kind of where you could take the category into other adjacent -- sorry, other adjacencies. Or for now, is it just block and tackle on the core? Thanks. That's it.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

It's both. So, actually, the core we saw the kind of upside within our categories, but innovation is a big driver for us. We've been investing both within R&D as well as within marketing and focusing on where this brand can go. I think cereal was a good test for us.

We could see if the brand could travel outside to other categories and other heavily trafficked aisles. And I think the early results are really positive. And so, we look at that -- we've always thought that a growth -- future growth was -- we've talked about center of store. And I think that this bodes well for that transition.

Now, it's just about what is the best strategy to go to center of store.

Rob Dickerson -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Got it. Thank you.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Ken Zaslow of Bank of Montreal.

Ken Zaslow -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

Hi, good morning everyone.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning.

Ken Zaslow -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

I have two questions. One is when you think about your shelf space gains, can you talk about how much shelf space you gained? And how much do you think that's permanent? And maybe that's my first question.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

So, we -- I'm forgetting the exact numbers in my prepared remarks, but we gained substantial shelf space both on Premier and on Dymatize this last quarter. We're pretty consistently gaining TDPs. TDPs are that -- we communicated that we're undershelved really. Our market share would -- from a kind of market share versus share of shelf, we are still undershelf.

So we still have room to grow. But this Q1 was a really big move. We gained substantial -- I think, I mentioned this in the last call we doubled our shelf size in a mass retailer. Coming up in the spring is the reset for some major food accounts.

We will continue to see big distribution expansions within those accounts, further expanding our brand block. So -- and then Dymatize, we gained I think 38% TDPs in FDM which is a big push for us. And that was mainly due to a mass account. And we're already seeing the velocities strong enough to hold that space and expand.

So, same thing on Dymatize, where we see these food accounts, which we're going to -- we're expecting to see some increase in Dymatize as well.

Ken Zaslow -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

My second question is when I think about expanding the Premier brand, what consumer insight did you see that would want Premier to get into the cereal category? A category, which I don't know if I could remember, but the possibility of success of a new brand in Cereal can't be more than 1%, right? It's a very low -- what consumer insights do you have that would give you the confidence that extending Premier into cereal versus I don't know, other categories would be the right foray for you to get into the center of the store? Just a thought there. Thanks,

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Well, the first thing is that we know that Premier, as a brand is consumed 60% of the time at breakfast. So, we also know that breakfast is an occasion, where consumers don't usually get enough protein. They have bagels and donuts and muffins. So -- and we know, as the old saying goes, it's the most important meal of the day.

So, that is I think the insights. Now, the second piece is, just a practical application, which I would just say is, we also happen to have a sister company who makes cereal. So, it was a fairly easy test to see if our brand could travel. So, I think there is very much steep and solid consumer insights, but also there's a practical element.

Ken Zaslow -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

Thank you, very much.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Kaumil Gajrawala of Credit Suisse.

Kaumil Gajrawala -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Hi, everybody. Good morning or I guess good afternoon. Can you talk a little bit about eCommerce, eCommerce capabilities, and maybe a bit about how much it grew, but also just how it's evolving? What sort of capital you might be putting in or investments you're making to expand that side of your business?

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, eCommerce is a big focus for us. So, just to give you a sense of kind of history and where we are. In 2019, eCommerce represented 6% of our business. It now is at 10% of our business.

We think that it could be 10% to 15%. So, we've invested -- also what's interesting about eCommerce, what we've learned is it is a great trial driver for us. So we're actually seeing the -- our household penetration grow in trial through eCommerce, and then sometimes actually then buy -- because our eCommerce product is a little bit more expensive than in other channels, oftentimes, we'll see consumers enter in an eCommerce and then repeat in other channels. And just from a capability standpoint, we are expanding marketing dollars.

We're actually looking at pursuing eCommerce-only innovation. We've increased headcount. And we have a general management, kind of, approach to eCommerce where we have kind of sales, marketing and operations working together because it is a different way to go to market.

Kaumil Gajrawala -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Interesting. Thank you. And then on the topic of -- the primary mission has been about increasing household penetration, and your successes of course now being replicated to the best of their ability by others. But we're also going into a time where pricing is necessary maybe promotion mitigation is necessary while competition is also increasing.

So how are you thinking about just the dynamic between those two? Is it a little bit of a -- are we in the growth curve of the industry where it's a bit of a real estate grab? Or is this something that you feel like it's OK to call the gist for a period of time, and deal with the input costs and worry about some of this other stuff later?

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Well, so last -- it's a great question. So last quarter I -- we came out and said that we would rather not take price. We wanted to drive top line. We felt like we would -- we were comfortable with the assumptions, the cost inflation assumptions that we had incorporated in our forecast to not take price.

However, we also said that if those assumptions prove to be too low, and the facts come up and they are higher than that, we would adjust our course. And that's what happened. Freight is, obviously, increasing as well as we saw some increase of dairy proteins. So we decided to take price at the back half.

We evaluated other areas like marketing et cetera. We just felt like given our household penetration and given our experience and our long-term goals of talking to more consumers and our marketing is working we didn't want to pull that back. So I still believe that even though we're taking price, we still will increase household penetration. And we're going to be watching that closely.

Kaumil Gajrawala -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of John Baumgartner of Wells Fargo.

John Baumgartner -- Wells Fargo Securities -- Analyst

Good morning. Thanks for the question.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning.

John Baumgartner -- Wells Fargo Securities -- Analyst

Maybe first off, Darcy. Back on the promotion front for Premier, in terms of total activity for 2021, how are you balancing the degree of activity between straight price discounts for consumers relative to investments for in-store displays, or any push levers for the trade? And how does that balance differ relative to the past few years as the brand now grows penetration?

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

So our philosophy -- and not really -- I wouldn't -- maybe it's not our philosophy. So from a promotion standpoint, a few years ago we used to only get TPRs from a trade perspective. Now because we have tested -- our brand is big enough. We've proved the retailers that actually we bring in more households when we're on display and we have quality merch.

We are only doing quality merch. So -- and that has made all the difference in the world from an effectiveness standpoint. So we -- once -- hopefully you guys have seen this, but in the New Year New You, I mean, we had displays in most retailers and large displays, sometimes multiproduct displays. And so -- and that is really important for us because we bring so many people from outside the category, and that we need to get out of the aisle to get people's eyeballs.

And then once we do, we hold them, we get the repeat and we grow the category for the long-term. So I think that -- let me see if I answered your question about promotion and the split.

John Baumgartner -- Wells Fargo Securities -- Analyst

Yes, absolutely right on point there. And then, I guess a follow-up just to come back to Dymatize, given that your comments this morning seem, I guess, pretty bullish as the new ISO products go from drawing board into the market. When you think about Premier exponentially surprising to the upside from the time it was acquired I guess back in 2013, how do you see the parallel evolving for Dymatize? I mean just given what you're sort of learning real-time about the brand and consumers. Is there any reason why it couldn't evolve into a $500 million business over time? I mean are the ambitions sort of changing or growing to any extent there? Thank you.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. We are very pleased with the momentum of Dymatize. I think what is encouraging is how it is taking in the mass. Not that long ago, this brand was a specialty-only product.

And so, to have -- and the team has done a fantastic job of repositioning it and changing and moving the channels to make it much more balanced. It's succeeding in eCommerce and again now mass. If I fast forward five years, I still believe Premier is going to be our big brand. I expect us to have more brands than just Premier and Dymatize.

But Premier will be the biggest brand just because it is the most mainstream brand. And I've talked about how we actually kind of source volume or appeal to all of the different consumers. But Dymatize has a very solid place right for athletes in sports nutrition. It has a very clear consumer.

And so, yes, I believe that it can be a much bigger brand, double the size that it is now eventually.

John Baumgartner -- Wells Fargo Securities -- Analyst

Well, I'm trying to spread the word out of Gold's Gym. So trying to do my part, for what it's worth. Thank you for your time.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of David Palmer of Evercore ISI.

David Palmer -- Evercore ISI -- Analyst

Thanks. Good morning. The question -- just a bit of a follow-up to Rob's question about retailers giving more merchandising and shelf at the expense of bars, and obviously that's a retailer decision. I guess there's consumer ones behind that.

And I guess there is a thought that this is a convenience play that bars are on-the-go-type products and maybe the shakes are not as much and this is a temporary thing. And as mobility returns it gets better for bars. That could be one narrative. But I suspect that's simplistic and there are other consumer needs demands that are at play here, that -- because ready-to-drink beverage is pretty convenient too.

So, could you just talk about that what you're seeing in terms of the interplay? And is it really one cannibalizing the other in your view?

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

They really have different occasions. So I mean, if you think of -- shakes are for the most part 60% consumed in the morning. They're more likely to be used as a meal -- a healthy meal replacement. Bars are much more snacking-oriented and they're much more on-the-go.

I think what -- there are a lot of consumer trends and macro trends that are fueling the RTD and the liquid side of things as well as the powder side of things that are tailwinds to bars, but not quite as much. And those are all around general health immunity. If you think of -- so most RTDs have a vitamin and mineral blend, those are very important to consumers. And so that -- when you're talking about people are trying to increase their immunity, et cetera, that becomes the work.

As we go more into kind of proactive health those naturally fall within RTDs. And I think you're going to start seeing a bigger divide between RTDs and powders and bars which have made their way much more into snacking.

David Palmer -- Evercore ISI -- Analyst

Got it. Thank you. And just a question on marketing and the message both how you market and what messages you're going to play on. And I'm wondering about the buzz creation type of stuff and how much of it is what you're trying to do in social media.

I wonder for example did you have something to do with the users combining Premier Protein with Starbucks Coffee, so that protein/coffee buzz that we saw out there over the last quarter or so? And what you're doing from a digital messaging standpoint the things you're pushing on from a message standpoint? Thanks.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. We love the Proffee. So what is -- so I don't know exciting about Premier is our consumers create the content. We don't ask them to.

They just do it because there is so much excitement and love for this brand. What we do is once they create it we fuel it. And we then kind of jump on it and give it more legs. Changes to strategies from an advertising standpoint, it's more tweaking than anything else.

We have TV, we have digital and social media. We are adding more dollars and more time to the budget. We're talking to more people. So we are adding consumers with different types of messages.

The beauty of obviously digital and social is that you can change the message slightly depending on who the audience is. We updated creative. I said this in my prepared remarks is, it's all been about our devoted fans really telling other people authentically why they consume the product. But now we're complementing those with what we're calling -- we call the first one's testimonials.

We call that second one's testimonials, which is really all about taste and hitting that how amazing our consumers believe the taste is and showing it in visuals. And then we're also supporting some of our new products with national media, which we've never done before. So those are some of the changes within our strategy and kind of how we amplify the buzz that already happened from our consumers.

David Palmer -- Evercore ISI -- Analyst

Thank you.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Bryan Spillane of Bank of America.

Bryan Spillane -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Hey. Good morning. Just two quick ones for me. One is, I know you talked a lot about kind of where the first quarter landed versus expectations and cadence for the year.

But I think I might have missed or I'm not sure if I might have missed this. But just where is consumption tracked relative to what your expectations were and especially around Premier and given just the elevation and activity you've had -- merchandising activity you've had? Has that run ahead of what your expectations were?

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Consumption is pretty consistent with our expectation. I would say with one small change is we did -- and I think I mentioned this, maybe in some of the follow-up to the last quarter is, we did see a small increase in November in some club stores when some of the additional lockdowns happened in several of the states almost like a mini-panic buy. What was interesting about it is, it appears to not -- people bought more, but yet -- but then they consumed more in the quarter. So it didn't affect our -- it didn't -- we didn't see the decrease that we saw in last March.

So that was the only thing that was surprising from a consumption standpoint. It's just a little bit of a panic buy in November.

Bryan Spillane -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

OK. Great. Thanks. And then just related to the price increase, should we factor in anything for customers maybe buying ahead of that price increase? So when it's effective -- so I guess trying to understand just whether or not there will be any other disconnects between shipments and consumption just consumption related to the price increase?

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. We don't -- that's going to happen. That will happen somewhat. We do monitor that.

And if people -- if retailers put in three times the orders than normal we will act on that and try to bring it down. So I wouldn't necessarily model in a massive increase. I think that we have control over that. We did not have that happen two years ago.

And so I think we have a process in place to address that.

Bryan Spillane -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Terrific. OK. Thank you.

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

[Operator signoff]

Duration: 61 minutes

Call participants:

Jennifer Meyerr -- Investor Relations

Darcy Davenport -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Paul Rode -- Chief Financial Officer

Ken Goldman -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

Andrew Lazar -- Barclays -- Analyst

Brian Holland -- D.A. Davidson -- Analyst

Chris Growe -- Stifel Financial Corp. -- Analyst

Tim Perz -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Bill Chappell -- Truist Securities -- Analyst

Jason English -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Rob Dickerson -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Ken Zaslow -- BMO Capital Markets -- Analyst

Kaumil Gajrawala -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

John Baumgartner -- Wells Fargo Securities -- Analyst

David Palmer -- Evercore ISI -- Analyst

Bryan Spillane -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

More BRBR analysis

All earnings call transcripts

This article represents the opinion of the writer, who may disagree with the “official” recommendation position of a Motley Fool premium advisory service. We’re motley! Questioning an investing thesis -- even one of our own -- helps us all think critically about investing and make decisions that help us become smarter, happier, and richer.