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Entegris Inc (ENTG) Q1 2021 Earnings Call Transcript

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ENTG earnings call for the period ending April 3, 2021.

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Entegris Inc (ENTG -4.07%)
Q1 2021 Earnings Call
Apr 27, 2021, 9:00 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good day everyone, and welcome to Entegris First Quarter 2021 Earnings Release Call. Today's call is being recorded.

At this time, I'd like to turn the call over for opening remarks and introductions over to Bill Seymour, VP of Investor Relations. Please go ahead, sir.

Bill Seymour -- Vice President of Investor Relations

Good morning, everyone. Earlier today, we announced the financial results for our first quarter of 2021. Before we begin, I'd like to remind listeners that our comments today will include some forward-looking statements. These statements involve a number of risks and uncertainties, and actual results could differ materially from those projected in our forward-looking statements. Additional information regarding these risks and uncertainties is contained in our most recent annual report and subsequent quarterly reports that we have filed with the SEC. Please refer to the information on the disclaimer slide in the presentation.

On this call, we will also refer to non-GAAP financial measures as defined by the SEC and Regulation G. You can find a reconciliation table in today's news release, as well as on our IR page of our website at entegris.com. On the call today are Bertrand Loy, our CEO and Greg Graves, our CFO.

With that, I'll hand the call over to Bertrand.

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Bill, and good morning to all. I hope everyone is staying healthy and safe in the present environment.

Turning to our first quarter performance, sales grew 24% year-on-year. Our growth was strong across all three divisions, as we benefited from accelerating industry conditions, several node transitions and strong overall demand for our products and solutions. Gross margin improved sequentially as we expected, and was up over 100 basis points from the fourth quarter. Adjusted EBITDA was up 25% year-on-year, and non-GAAP EPS was up 27% year-over-year.

Let me provide a little bit more color on our Q1 revenue performance. From a product standpoint, we continued to benefit from accelerated demand for leading-edge solutions, especially in liquid filtration, advanced deposition materials and specialty coatings. Sales to memory customers were up 40% year-on-year and up sequentially. As you recall, Entegris content per wafer is rapidly increasing in the new higher layer count memory devices.

In addition, our Aramus high-purity bags, which are being used for the distribution and storage of the COVID-19 vaccine, recorded stronger sales than planned as our team successfully ramped new capacity. While sales growth was strong overall, we did face some challenges in what proved to be a very dynamic industry environment, particularly in the areas of freight capacity as well as supply chain and labor constraints in certain U.S. locations. We are aggressively managing these situations, and we expect them to ease as we progress through the year. That said, demand for our products and solutions continues to be very strong. And our order book is at record levels, which bodes very well for us, as we look ahead to the second quarter and the balance of the year.

More specifically for the full year, our outlook for the industry and Entegris has improved significantly. The semi market looks very healthy, bolstered by a robust global GDP outlook and strong overall chip demand, driven by accelerated digitalization, 5G and high performance computing. In addition, we have recently seen significant increases in our customers' capex plans for the year.

Given this backdrop, for the full year 2021, we now expect the market, based on our unit capex mix, will be up 13% to 14% compared to our previous expectations of up 7% to 8%. And as I said, demand for our solution set continues to be very strong. And as a result, we expect to outperform the market and now expect our sales growth for the full year 2021 to range from 17% to 19% compared to our previous expectations of up 11% to 13%.

Finally, we expect the EBITDA flow through to be in line with our target model and now expect full year 2021 non-GAAP EPS to exceed $3.15 compared to our previous expectation of non-GAAP EPS greater than $2.85. Looking further ahead, we are very optimistic about the long-term fundamentals of the semiconductor market, accelerating chip demand and a higher proportion of wafers produced at the leading-edge, provide a great base for very attractive secular industry growth. On top of this, at Entegris, we are benefiting from the growing importance of process materials and materials purity to new device architectures.

We expect that these key trends will continue to result in a rapidly expanding served market and increasing Entegris content per wafer, and all of this is supported by the strength of our team's execution and our highly resilient, differentiated unit driven business model. Finally, I want to take a moment to thank our customers for the trust and confidence they place in Entegris and thank you Entegris teams around the world for their incredible work.

Now, let me turn the call to Greg. Greg?

Gregory Graves -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Bertrand, and good morning, everyone.

Our sales in Q1 were $513 million, up 24% year-over-year and down slightly sequentially. Moving onto gross margin, GAAP and non-GAAP gross margin were both 45.8%, slightly above our guidance of 45.5%. The biggest drivers of the increase were the expected improvement in SCEM's gross margin, following a weak Q4 and better overall factory performance. We expect gross margin to be approximately 46.5% both on a GAAP and non-GAAP basis in Q2. We also continue to expect gross margin will continue to improve throughout the rest of the year and be approximately 46.5% for all of 2021.

GAAP operating expenses were $121 million in Q1 and included $14 million of non-GAAP items from amortization of intangible assets, integration and other costs. Non-GAAP operating expenses in Q1 were $107 million, which was slightly above our guidance range. We expect GAAP operating expenses to be approximately $122 million to $124 million in Q2. We expect non-GAAP operating expenses to be approximately $108 million to $110 million. Q1 GAAP operating income was $114 million. Non-GAAP operating income was $128 million or 25% of revenue in line with our expectations and up both year-on-year and sequentially. Adjusted EBITDA was approximately $150 million or 29% of revenue, and was also in line with our expectations.

Moving to below the operating line. Looking at the other income expense line, a negative move during Q1 in the same currencies that favorably impacted us in Q4 resulted in other income expense, going from $5 million positive in Q4 to $4 million negative in Q1. Our GAAP tax rate was 14% and our non-GAAP tax rate was 15% for the quarter. For Q2, we expect our GAAP tax rate will be approximately 12% and our non-GAAP tax rate will be approximately 16%. For the full year 2021, we expect both our GAAP and non-GAAP tax rate will be approximately 18%.

Q1 GAAP diluted EPS was $0.62 per share. Non-GAAP EPS of $0.70 per share was up 27% year-over-year and down slightly sequentially. EPS would have been approximately $0.02 higher in Q1, excluding the negative currency impact on the other income expense line item I just mentioned.

Turning to our performance by division. Q1 sales of $167 million for SCEM were up 15% year-over-year and down slightly sequentially as expected. The year-over-year growth was primarily driven by advance deposition materials, cleaning chemistries, specialty gases, and advanced coatings. Adjusted operating margin for SCEM was 21% for the quarter, up over 300 basis points sequentially. The sequential increase in operating margin was primarily related to the improvement in the gross margin I just mentioned.

Q1 sales of $207 million for MC were up 30% from last year and up slightly sequentially. Liquid filtration and gas purification drove the sales growth year-on-year. It's worth noting that gas filtration had its best quarter in years and is seeing the benefit of increasing WFE spending in the industry. Adjusted operating margin for MC was 34%, up significantly year-over-year and down slightly sequentially.

Q1 sales of $149 million for AMH were up 28% versus last year and down 2% sequentially. The year-over-year sales increase was driven by growth across all major product platforms, strong sales of our Aramus high-purity bags and the impact of the GMTI acquisition. The sequential sales decline can mostly be attributed to the catch-up royalty income from Gudeng Precision that occurred in Q4. Adjusted operating margin for AMH was 22%, up almost 400 basis points year-over-year and down slightly sequentially. The year-over-year margin increase was driven by the higher sales volume and solid cost management.

First quarter cash flow from operations was $53 million and free cash flow was $10 million. As a reminder, Q1 typically has the lowest cash flow of the year, primarily due to the variable compensation payment that is made during the first quarter. Capex for the quarter was $43 million. Given the strong demand environment, we now expect to spend approximately $225 million in capex this year, up $25 million from our previous expectation. These investments are in support of our global product introductions, capacity expansions, including the Aramus bags and for the initial phase of the previously announced investment in our new Taiwan facility.

Consistent with our capital allocation strategy, during Q1, we used approximately $11 million for our quarterly dividend and we repurchased $15 million of our shares. You probably saw that we recently took advantage of a favorable debt market and announced and priced $400 million of senior unsecured notes due in 2029 at an interest rate of 3.625%. We will use the proceeds as well as cash on hand and a small draw on our revolving credit facility to payoff the existing $550 million, 4.625% notes due in 2026. This effectively extends the due date three years and lowers the rate by a 100 basis points.

As a result of the refinancing, we are expecting $23 million of one-time costs, primarily related to the call premium for the existing notes that will impact GAAP EPS in Q2. And on an ongoing basis with the changes to our debt, we are now expecting interest expense to be approximately $10 million per quarter starting in Q3, a $2 million reduction from recent levels.

Now for our Q2 outlook. We expect sales to range from $530 million to $545 million. We expect GAAP EPS to be $0.56 to $0.61 per share and non-GAAP EPS to be $0.77 to $0.82 per share.

In summary, demand for our products and solutions is the highest it's ever been, validating the importance of our offering and the strength of the market and we look forward to a strong Q2 and another record year.

Operator, we'll now open up for questions.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

Thank you. [Operator Instructions] We would take our first question from Toshiya Hari of Goldman Sachs. Please go ahead.

Toshiya Hari -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Good morning. Thanks for taking my questions and congrats on the strong outlook. Bertrand, you revised up your market outlook for 2021 from up 7% to 8% to up 13% to 14%. Can you -- and sorry if I missed this, but can you differentiate between how you're thinking about the capex outlook for the industry versus wafer starts? And in terms of how you're thinking about your own business, the 17% to 19% growth for the year, if you can provide a little bit more color by segment, that would be helpful. Thank you.

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Sure. Happy to do that, Toshiya. So, we at least [Phonetic] need to increase our guidance for the year. Those numbers are all organic, first of all. And back to your question in terms of what's behind the industry assumption, well, we expect and decide to grow in the low-teens for the year. And on the capex front, we expect capex -- and again, here I'm talking about the industry capex, not just WFE. We expect capex to be up in the low-20s. And that gives you a blend of about 13% to 14% for the industry. And then again, outperformance of about four to five points for Entegris. So very much in line with the commitments that we made during our recent Analyst Day.

Toshiya Hari -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

And then how are you thinking about the segments, Bertrand? Is there any additional color that you can provide for the full year?

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Well, in terms of what is going to drive the outperformance, first, we think it's going to be a continuation of the trends that we saw in Q1. A lot of benefits that we expect to continue to see from the memory segment. 3D NAND, as you know, is a big opportunity for Entegris. Nanofins, edge selectivity and conformality becomes particularly important as more wafers are produced at 128 layers and more and we expect about 30% of the wafers to be produced at 128 layers and more this year as compared to only 10% last year. So, that's going to be a big driver for us, and that will benefit our advance deposition materials. It will benefit our specialty coating product lines. And, of course, it will benefit our liquid microcontamination product lines as well.

Toshiya Hari -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Great. That's super helpful. And then as a quick follow-up, Bertrand, in your prepared remarks, you talked about some challenges related to freight and supply and labor. How meaningful were those headwinds in Q1? I'm assuming there was some revenue impact brought from those challenges, and what are your expectations in terms of Q2 and the back half? You talked about some of these easing as you progress through the year, but should we expect some of these challenges to persist in Q2 and perhaps in Q3? Thank you.

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. As I said in my prepared remarks, we all very, very focused on managing the various constraints that we saw and experienced in Q1. And I cited three different types of constraints. One was the supply chain shortages that we experienced, our own capacity limitations, and then the last one was freight. So, I think, on the supply side, we expect those situations to ease out in Q2, Q3. As it relates to our own capacity, we have a number of initiatives to add -- that would actually add capacity in Q2 and then more additional capacity coming into the balance of the year. And then trade is a situation that hopefully will get better as the general economies start to open up. But again, all of those various constraints and the plans to mitigate them -- or have been taken into account in our revised annual guidance.

Toshiya Hari -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Thank you. Congrats again.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Sidney Ho of Deutsche Bank. Please go ahead.

Sidney Ho -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Great. Thanks for taking my question. My first question is on margin. You suggested gross margin will still get to the 46.5% for the full year. But given the good start in first quarter and second quarter, why won't that gross margin go higher? And kind of related to that, if I can look at the operating margin side, especially for SCEM, nice improvement there, 300 basis points quarter-over-quarter. Looking forward, can you help us understand what are the key drivers to get to your target of 25% to 27%?

Gregory Graves -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

So, first of all, Sidney, on the gross margin, so through the first half we had a 45.5%, a little over 45.5% quarter in Q1, I guess 45.8%. We expect 46.5% in Q2, so that brings us to an average of a little bit over 46%. To get to 46.5% for the full year, it implies back half margins of about 47%. And so those are our assumptions as it relates to gross margin.

So we see some improvements related to volume. We're counting -- we're not counting on better than average product mix. We're counting on typical product mix. So, those are our primary assumptions on the gross margin. And then, the second part of your question, could you repeat that? You said -- I heard the 25%, but I didn't get the starting point.

Sidney Ho -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Yeah. Related to operating margins for SCEM, again, good improvement in Q1. How do we -- from the roughly 21% range, how do we get to that 25% to 27%? What are the key drivers to get there?

Gregory Graves -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. So, it's really three things. I mean, they've got -- we'll see continued gross margin improvement there in that business. We expect to see them continue to manage their -- they've made much of their investment in ER&D and SG&A. So, we'd expect there to be pretty significant leverage on the improved gross margin. And then, we've talked consistently about improving volumes in our specialty materials/graphite business as we move throughout the year. That would be -- that should be helpful as well.

Sidney Ho -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Okay. That's helpful. Maybe a follow-up question is kind of relate to the earlier question to 2Q you answered. But beyond second quarter, what kind of visibility do you have in the second half of the year at this point when compared to same time in the past years, especially given the semiconductor shortage or wafer shortage we're seeing? And maybe asked differently, if demand continues to improve, do you think you'll be able to see much variability to your full year revenue forecast given supply shortages out there? Thank you.

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

So, Sidney, I would say that the visibility is actually pretty good right now. And our order book is at record levels as we mentioned earlier. So, that gives us a good level of comfort for the rest of the year. That's really what we reflected into the full year guidance. We talked about capacity and the constraints that we're working on resolving. We all obviously very focused on that. I mean, short-term, it's really about -- and I'm talking about Q2 -- it's really about getting the most out of the current equipment and infrastructure. So, it's really mostly a staffing challenge here in the U.S. But we have been hiring and we are training the number of new shifts and we intend to upgrade that 7x24 in most sites, starting sometime in -- later in Q2.

And then at the backend of the year, in second half of the year, new equipment is going to come online. That's going to provide additional relief in particular for our liquid filtration platform. But then if you go beyond that next two, obviously, we're going to start seeing the benefits of a number of two investments, including the new Taiwan site, and that's important because our growth objectives, obviously, go well beyond 2021. We have very aggressive growth objectives for many years to come. So, we are very focused on the capacity short-term, mid-term and long-term.

Sidney Ho -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Great. Thank you very much.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Mike Harrison of Seaport Global Securities. Please go ahead.

Mike Harrison -- Seaport Global Securities -- Analyst

Hi, good morning.

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning.

Mike Harrison -- Seaport Global Securities -- Analyst

In Microcontamination Control, you mentioned that your gas filtration business had the best quarter in years. It sounds like that was more equipment driven. So, can you, number one, talk about what is driving the strength in the gas filtration business? And then maybe talk about the sustainability as you think about equipment sales being maybe a leading indicator for some of the consumable sales within that business.

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

So, Mike, your assessment is correct. Our gas filtration business had a record quarter and a lot of that comes from the increased levels of WFE spending. And we expect those levels of demand to continue at least for the balance of the year. And that's going to continue to benefit that product line again, for many quarters to come.

When it comes to the long-term implications of all of that, actually what we are most excited about Entegris is, not just so much the current level of new fab construction, but it's really in a few years from now 2023 and beyond when all of that new capacity is going to come online, those new fabs will be running processes, the most advanced processes in logic and in memory where we have a higher content per wafer. So, obviously, pleased with the short-term increase in capex and what it means for some of our product lines, but more excited about the long-term prospects as those new fabs come online.

Mike Harrison -- Seaport Global Securities -- Analyst

All right. And then within the advanced material handling business, I believe you showed revenue growth, so in the high 20s there. But you mentioned the strength in Aramus and the impact of the GTMI acquisition. Can you give us a sense of what organic growth would have looked like in that AMH business versus the 28% number that you showed?

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So, I mean, remember, given the timing of some of these acquisitions, I mean, the inorganic impact is relatively modest and if you exclude the life science business, I would say that it would be in the high teens for AMH versus Q1 of last year. Is that the question, Mike?

Mike Harrison -- Seaport Global Securities -- Analyst

Yes. That answers it. And maybe just one last one. You overshot the operating expense number by about a $1 million. Anything -- any color you can provide on what drove that overrun?

Gregory Graves -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Mike, not really anything in particular. I mean, I would say if I could point to one thing and I referred to it earlier that, some of the investments in ER&D within our divisions, probably spent a little bit more than we initially anticipated, and that's not something -- honestly, when we're spending more on ER&D as long as it's within reason, I feel good about that.

Mike Harrison -- Seaport Global Securities -- Analyst

All right. Thanks very much.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Chris Kapsch of Loop Capital Markets. Please go ahead.

Chris Kapsch -- Loop Capital Markets -- Analyst

Yeah. Good morning. Thank you. So, you characterized your order backlogs at record levels, both in the formal remarks and in response to another question. I'm just wondering if you could characterize any instances where your best demand growth -- those orders are outsized relative to your revised market expectations. And also, is there any sense that some of this demand is above and beyond sort of the industry conditions? In other words, are there instances where customers are just desperately trying to build buffer stocks, or is this just reflecting true end market demand?

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

So, I think what we're seeing is really true end market demand. I think, there is a high level of demand for advanced chips and for mainstream chips. And the demand for our products really comes from the high level of fab utilizations that we've been seeing across most segments. Today, I would argue that many of our advanced fab customers, in particular, are running with very low levels of safety stocks, and in some cases uncomfortably low levels of safety stocks. So, I think that again there is a solid pent-up demand for our solutions that is based on actual demand drivers, as well as the desire by some of our customers to get back to more normal levels of safety stocks for some of our products.

Chris Kapsch -- Loop Capital Markets -- Analyst

Fair enough. Thanks. And then just to follow-up on, you mentioned, I think it was your memory or sales into the memory fabs up, I think 40%. And you also made some comment about the architecture shift that's ongoing there in terms of expectations for the year. So, just wondering if the current strength, is it reflective of just across the board fab utilization rates in the memory end market, or is it reflected a shift that's already happening. Any color on -- sort of the cadence of that and the direction and trajectory of that business, would be helpful. Thanks.

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

So, if you look at fab utilization, especially in 3D NAND, there was really not a lot of change Q1 versus Q4. And so, a lot of the benefit that we saw was coming from the migration to higher layer count devices, as I was mentioning earlier. And you know that this is the type of architectures where we have higher content per wafer. And I would say that the rate of adoption of the new materials that we've developed for those architectures, the new chemistries that we've developed, it's just accelerating as expected and as we presented during our recent Analyst Day.

So, again, it's a trend that will be beneficial to us this year. But we expect more conversion to 128 layers in 2022, 2023. And if you go beyond 2021, we would expect more migration to 256 layers and beyond where we have yet increased opportunities per wafer.

Chris Kapsch -- Loop Capital Markets -- Analyst

Helpful. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Patrick Ho of Stifel. Please go ahead.

Patrick Ho -- Stifel -- Analyst

Thank you very much and congrats on the nice outlook for the year. Bertrand, maybe first off on the advanced foundry/logic side, traditionally you've seen continued capital intensity increases in your Microcontamination Control business as we could note. Can you just remind investor and myself included in terms of some of the materials opportunities that are currently ongoing and whether you need to see the industry transition to the nanowires gate all around for that next step up on the materials end?

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So, we -- of course, we've been talking a lot about memory, and Patrick, you are reminding us that we have also great opportunities on the logic front and you're right. I think that we mentioned those opportunities and we quantified those opportunities in November last year and they are real. The opportunities will be for new metals, new high K materials, and selective edge chemistries will start to also be introduced with gate all around architectures. So, the next few years will be equally exciting in logic.

And when it comes to node transition to logic, I think that the second half of this year, 2021, we will see some large customer transitioning to a new node. So that will actually drive adoption of some of those new materials and those more advanced situation -- solutions as well. So, I would say that for us, the first half of the year is more of a memory story. The second half of the year will be both memory and advanced logic.

Patrick Ho -- Stifel -- Analyst

Great. That's helpful. And maybe as my follow-up question for Greg, in terms of opex, it is going up slightly in the June quarter, and you didn't mention bringing on additional labor. How much is that labor content going to impact the rest of 2021 in terms of the opex loss?

Gregory Graves -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

So, when we see the increases in opex, primarily investments in ER&D and some modest increases in SG&A. When we talk about labor, we're primarily talking about cost of sales and adding additional labor to help us meet the demands for our products.

Patrick Ho -- Stifel -- Analyst

Great. Thank you very much.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Amanda Scarnati of Citi. Please go ahead.

Amanda Scarnati -- Citi -- Analyst

Hi, good morning. I just want to talk a little bit about SMIC licenses. Earlier in the quarter, there was news reports that Entegris was able to gain some licenses there. Can you just talk about the scope of what that looked like, and if there's any ongoing discussion with the U.S. government in terms of expanding sales to China or any additional restrictions potentially that you're seeing?

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

So good morning, Amanda, first. Let me start with the broader part of your question first. I mean, of course, the industry as a whole and integrity in particular is, it's very engaged with the U.S. administration right now. And it's important, especially in the early days of the new Biden Administration. And -- but I think generally speaking, I think that we need to accept that the semiconductor industry, because of its broad strategic importance is likely going to remain an area of tension between the two nations.

So, going back to the first part of your question, like everybody else right now, we are very focused on complying with the existing rules. And for us, as we discussed in the previous earnings call, it means applying for export licenses for all of our U.S. made products, and giving some time to the Administration to review and approve those licenses. What I can share with you is that, we have -- some of our licenses received approval since the beginning of the year. But there are some that are still under review, and we are awaiting approval. But all of that -- that's been factored into our Q2 guidance and our annual guidance and we've been monitoring different scenarios.

Amanda Scarnati -- Citi -- Analyst

Great. And do you think -- the fact that there's so many semiconductor shortages, the fact that Aramus [Phonetic] is one of the larger foundry that creates a little bit more of an easing of maybe material sales, or is it just sort of broad products that you're -- that you've already been given licenses for?

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Look, I don't have that specific insight into how the Administration is making decision on granting those licenses. I would just say that we're pleased to have received approval on many of our licenses. And I think that we're making good progress, and I am hopeful that we will get approval on the balance of the licenses that are still pending approval, but again, we won't know until we hear from the Administration.

Amanda Scarnati -- Citi -- Analyst

Great. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from David Silver of CL King. Please go ahead.

David Silver -- CL King -- Analyst

Yeah. Hi. Thank you. I was wondering if we could just maybe talk a little bit about the Aramus product line. So, there's a couple of moving parts here, but back on Investor Day, I think you called out the Aramus product as something that was going to account for a full 1% of company growth in 2021. And since then a number of things have changed. You've raised your growth targets. You've completed a capacity expansion. I believe you've called that out. So, I'm just wondering, if you could maybe update us on the expectations for the Aramus growth this year? And then secondarily, is there -- was the current capacity expansion, one of a planned series, or is that the final capacity expansion for some time now? Thank you.

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So, it is indeed a great story for us, and then 2020 was really obviously a turning point for this particular technology. Our strategy has always been to target emerging biologics. And the reason we wanted to target gene and cellular therapies is that they have very unique supply chains and very unique requirements involving freestyle processing, where those high-purity Aramus bags perform really, really well. As a matter of fact, we believe that all bags are just the best solutions in the market right now. They have lower extractables, lower leachables that makes them the cleanest bag available, and they are more resistant than any other bag in the market. They can with then gotten us the realization and didn't -- they do not break. They do not leak when they are frozen.

So, with that as a backdrop, the projection for this platform in 2021 is now closer to $40 million. So a little bit more than when we last spoke. And that's the reason why we are adding capacity. We invested about $10 million in capacity last year. We plan to invest about $30 million this year. By the way, those numbers are obviously included in the capex guidance that Greg gave you. And just to be clear, those investments go well beyond supporting the needs of the global COVID-19 vaccination campaigns. The strategy here is really to support the needs of all biotech customers as they develop the therapies of the future.

David Silver -- CL King -- Analyst

Okay. Thank you for that. I had -- maybe another question about supply chain in general and in particular kind of your global footprint. So, at a number of points you've talked about wafer fab utilization and extremely high rates, and you've cited some of your customers running with uncomfortably low safety stocks. And your job, I guess, as a trusted supplier is to meet their needs as they evolve.

So, whether it's in -- in other words any enhanced capex budget, or other areas. I mean, what are some of the tactical steps that you're taking in the current business environment those to support your customers and I guess, exploit the unusually robust demand opportunity that you see currently? Thanks.

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. It's a great question. I think, I already attempted to answer it earlier. And as I said, we are very, very focused at all levels at Entegris right now to make sure that we have enough capacity coming online and backend of this year, and then ensure that we have enough capacity longer term to live up to the increasingly pace at which the demand for our products is evolving and to meet customer's expectations. So, again, a lot of focus short-term on staffing and then mid-term on unlocking the capacity potential of a number of investments in new equipment that we have already made, and that will be coming online in backend of the year. And then longer term, it's all about expanding our footprint.

And the Taiwanese site is a good example of what we're trying to do. We're trying to not only just add capacity, but we're trying to do that closer to our customers so that we can reduce the cycles of learning during the development phase. And then -- of course, then reduce our lead times when we start manufacturing locally. And then generally speaking, what we're trying to do is really just have greater capabilities on the ground, close to our largest customer to better support them long-term.

Once the Taiwanese investment will be completed in 2023, we would expect that about 50% of our production will be in Asia-Pacific, which is -- where most of the semiconductors are being made today, that may change in the future. There are a lot of discussions about that, but at least for now it will be balanced our global capacity on a global basis.

David Silver -- CL King -- Analyst

Okay. And then, one last one may be for Greg. Greg, I think you called out negative foreign currency translation this quarter as a line item that may be mixed the bottom line by a couple of pennies. Can you maybe -- and I apologize if I missed this -- but can you remind me what the key, I guess, currency relationship or relationships that let the negative effect there? I'm assuming, weak U.S. dollar, but not sure maybe versus Korea, Taiwan or whatever. And then maybe what's -- just -- if you could call out the key relationships, so maybe we could track that over the next few months. Thank you.

Gregory Graves -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. So, let me comment, generally. So, from a P&L perspective down to the operating line, we continue to believe we have a relatively natural hedge, because we're selling in multiple currencies, but we're also -- both manufacturing and have opex in multiple currencies. So, like I said at the operating line, it's not a perfect hedge, but it's a pretty good hedge. Below the operating line, other income expenses, just what I commented on in the script really has to do with the reevaluation of the balance sheet of our foreign subsidiary. So, it has nothing to do with our revenue or our expense structure.

And the key currencies that are involved are the Korean won, the Japanese yen and in the most recent quarter, the Euro actually had some impact. And it's not -- it's too simple to say that it's how they do versus the dollar, because it's not -- it relates to what is the functional currency of the subsidiary entity. And so, it's something, I mean, I can walk you through it in great detail. Although, I wouldn't want to do that on this call, but it really, like I said, it has to do with the revaluation of assets that are denominated in something other than the functional currency.

David Silver -- CL King -- Analyst

Okay. So, a weaker dollar versus the yen and the won, is what you were calling out. Is that correct?

Gregory Graves -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Weaker dollar versus the yen, for sure, versus the won -- I'd have to go back and look at it. But the movement in the won -- the won moved in the opposite direction in Q4 than it moved in Q1. So, we had a benefit in Q1 and a negative impact in...

David Silver -- CL King -- Analyst

Okay.

Gregory Graves -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

We had a benefit in Q4 and a negative impact in Q1, excuse me.

David Silver -- CL King -- Analyst

Got it. Okay. Thank you very much.

Operator

Thank you. Our final question comes from Paretosh Misra of Berenberg. Please go ahead.

Paretosh Misra -- Berenberg -- Analyst

Thank you. Good morning and thanks for taking the question. In your SCEM business, across the three product categories, gases, cleaning chemicals and deposition materials, any contrast you could provide on growth rates? Just trying to get a sense if all three categories add up similar growth rates or one is growing at much faster than the others.

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

So, first, I mean, you got it right, Paretosh. I think those are the fastest growing business units within this division. Think about deposition materials growing in the low 30%, so very significant growth. And then, specialty material is a little bit of a tale of two cities because we have advanced coatings growing very, very fast. And then, the graphite business that is still in a slow recovery mode. But the combination of all of that gives you a -- mid-teens roughly, and then SPI is also performing at those levels. And that includes all selective edge products, which has -- a product that we introduced last year and is really going to be one of the big growth contributor for SCEM going forward.

Paretosh Misra -- Berenberg -- Analyst

Thanks for that color, Bertrand. And then my follow-up, I was wondering if you could comment on the M&A landscape in the Microcontamination business. Are there opportunities in Microcontamination outside semiconductor that might be attractive to you?

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Well, if you look at Anow, and the strategic rationale beyond the Anow acquisition, you're absolutely correct that we believe there are opportunities for us to venture into adjacent applications. And the best way for us to supplement the existing capabilities that we have internally is to find some of those tuck-ins. So, Anow is a very important piece to that puzzle. We are going to continue to look at other alternatives as well.

When it comes to Anow, I must also admit to the fact that the current pandemic and the travel limitations have been a little bit of a headwind in terms of cross-pollinization that I was expecting to see between the U.S. development teams and the China based teams. But the business is very healthy and I hope that joint development work can start relatively quickly. But you're right. It's one of the few areas of focus when it comes to M&A. The other area being materials as we have discussed in a number of occasions.

Paretosh Misra -- Berenberg -- Analyst

Thank you. That's all I had. Appreciate it, Bertrand.

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Sure.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Duration: 51 minutes

Call participants:

Bill Seymour -- Vice President of Investor Relations

Bertrand Loy -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Gregory Graves -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Toshiya Hari -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Sidney Ho -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Mike Harrison -- Seaport Global Securities -- Analyst

Chris Kapsch -- Loop Capital Markets -- Analyst

Patrick Ho -- Stifel -- Analyst

Amanda Scarnati -- Citi -- Analyst

David Silver -- CL King -- Analyst

Paretosh Misra -- Berenberg -- Analyst

More ENTG analysis

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