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Silicon Laboratories Inc (NASDAQ:SLAB)
Q1 2021 Earnings Call
Apr 28, 2021, 8:30 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good morning. My name is Matt, and I will be your conference operator for today. At this time, I would like to welcome everyone to Silicon Labs' First Quarter Fiscal 2021 Earnings Conference Call. [Operator Instructions]

I would now like to turn the conference over to Austin Dean, Silicon Labs' Investor Relations Manager. Please go ahead.

Austin Dean -- Investor Relations Manager

Thank you, Matt, and good morning everyone. Tyson Tuttle, Chief Executive Officer, John Hollister, Chief Financial Officer, and Giovanni Pacelli, Senior Director of Finance are on today's call.

We will discuss our financial performance for the first quarter, and review our business activities. After our prepared comments, we will take questions. Our earnings press release and the accompanying financial tables are available in the Investor Relations section of our website at www.silabs.com. This call is also being webcast and a replay will be available for four weeks.

Our comments today will include forward-looking statements subject to risks and uncertainties. We base these forward-looking statements on information available to us as of the date of this conference call, and assume no obligation to update these statements in the future. We encourage you to review our SEC filings, which identify important risk factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements.

Additionally, during our call today, we will refer to certain non-GAAP financial information. A reconciliation of our GAAP to non-GAAP results is included in the company's earnings press release, and in the Investor Relations section of Silicon Labs' website.

I will now turn the call over to Silicon Labs' Chief Financial Officer, John Hollister.

John Hollister -- Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Austin, and welcome everyone.

Last week we signed a definitive asset purchase agreement with Skyworks Solutions for the divestiture of our Infrastructure and Automotive business launching our transformation into a pure play leader of intelligent wireless connectivity for the IoT market. We also announced organizational changes that will enhance our ability to capitalize on this exciting new opportunity in IoT. Matt Johnson, formerly Senior Vice President and General Manager of IoT has been promoted to President of Silicon Labs, where he will be leading our day-to-day business operations, as well as our product development activities. Daniel Cooley, formerly our Chief Strategy Officer, will now serve as our Chief Technology Officer, where he will continue to develop our technology roadmap and align our products and solutions to the market opportunity before us. Tyson Tuttle will continue as Chief Executive Officer to further evangelize our products and platform to the growing IoT customer base.

Please note that the divestiture will include a small ASIC product line currently classified in the IoT reporting category, which accounted for less than $3 million of revenue last year. Our comments today will focus on the consolidated operations of Silicon Labs. We expect to be in position to report on our continuing operations on an IoT only basis in the July call.

We are very pleased to announce this morning record revenue for the first quarter at $256 million, up 5% sequentially and 19% year-on-year, significantly exceeding the high-end of our initial guidance for the quarter. IoT revenue for the quarter was $158 million, above our expectations, up 7% from Q4, and 34% year-on-year. IoT Wireless led the way with 44% year-on-year growth in Q1, with strong double-digit growth across all our major wireless protocols. Infrastructure and Automotive revenue in Q1 ended at $97 million, up 2% sequentially and about flat year-on-year. Timing and Isolation both increased from Q4, offset by slight declines in other I&A product lines.

Turning to end markets, revenue from industrial, consumer and communications markets were all up in Q1. Automotive was down slightly, coming off a strong Q4 recovery. Distribution sales were 79% of total revenue for the quarter, and we ended Q1 with DSI at around 41 days, down from 47 days at the end of Q4 with strong POS to end customers, driving down the distributor inventory level.

Geographically, we saw particular strength in Q1 in APAC and Europe, with sales in the Americas down in the quarter. Total bookings were very strong again this quarter, and about 5% higher than Q4 bookings, which were already at an elevated level. Non-GAAP gross margin for the quarter ended better than expected at 59.1%, due to strength in product mix, as well as operational efficiencies with the upside in revenue. Non-GAAP operating expenses in the quarter were $103 million, up about 6% from Q4, primarily due to increased payroll taxes, variable compensation, and medical claims expenses. R&D expenses were $61 million or 24% of revenue in the quarter, and SG&A expenses were $42 million or 17% of revenue.

Non-GAAP operating profit for the first quarter was $48 million or 18.7% of revenue. Our non-GAAP effective tax rate for the quarter was 10.8%. Non-GAAP earnings ended at $0.91 per share. On a GAAP basis, gross margin was 58.9%. GAAP operating expenses were $128 million. Stock compensation expense was $14 million, and amortization of intangible assets was $12 million, both in line with expectations.

Turning now to the balance sheet, we ended the quarter with cash and investments totaling $578 million. Our operating cash flow in the first quarter was $15 million, with significant cash outlays related to seasonally higher payroll taxes and increased levels of working capital. Accounts receivable was up on strong shipments in Q1, ending at $104 million. Our DSO increased slightly to 37 days. We have no known bad debt exposures related to our accounts receivable. The inventory balance grew in the quarter to $79 million, on anticipated growth in the business, with inventory turns declining to 5.3 times, which is still higher than our goal.

Though the overall supply chain in the semiconductor market remains tight, our fabulous business model, efficient manufacturing techniques, and outstanding relationships with our suppliers have enabled us to deliver upside results for Q1. During the first quarter, we completed the redemption of our 2022 convertible notes, and have no balance outstanding on those notes. The 2025 convertible notes have a $535 million balance. Our balance sheet remains very strong and well capitalized.

I will now cover guidance for the second quarter. We expect revenue in the second quarter to be in the range of $262 million to $272 million, with IoT roughly flat sequentially, limited by supply and I&A up sequentially. As we indicated last week, we expect IoT revenue to grow 25% to 30% for the full year or between $640 million and $660 million. The demand for our products is very strong and our revenue outlook for the second quarter is supply constrained. We are working continuously and aggressively with our suppliers to open up additional capacity. We expect the tight supply conditions to persist for several quarters as factories need time to qualify new production capacity.

We expect non-GAAP gross margin to be in the range of 57% to 58%. Based on the supply chain situation we have experienced cost increases and expedite charges from a number of our suppliers, which is impacting our gross margin. We are implementing additional price increases but expect will be slightly below model on gross margin for the balance of this year. We expect non-GAAP operating expenses to be approximately $104 million. We expect our non-GAAP effective tax rate will be 11.5% for the second quarter. Based on current tax law and accounting rules, we expect our 2022 non-GAAP effective tax rate to be in the low to mid 20s on a combined company basis.

For Q2, we expect non-GAAP earnings per share to be in the range of $0.88 to $0.98. On a GAAP basis, we expect gross margin to be between 57% and 58%, operating expenses to be $130 million and GAAP earnings per share to be in the range of $0.28 to $0.38.

I will now turn the call over to Tyson.

Tyson Tuttle -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, John. We are pleased to report record first quarter revenue. The pandemic has led to an accelerated digital transformation creating market opportunities we've been able to seize through organic growth despite unprecedented global supply chain constraints. The revival of economic activity stemming from the recovery signals greater market growth ahead and we are well positioned to continue to capture share in 2021. Our opportunity pipeline continues to be robust at $15 billion and our design win lifetime revenue achievement in Q1 was up 8% year-on-year. Bookings have been very strong in recent months with the semiconductor industry poised to deliver an excellent 2021.

Turning to our IoT business. Wireless connectivity products continue to see surging momentum posting greater than 40% year-over-year growth in first quarter revenue. In Q1, we saw strength across our entire wireless portfolio with robust and consistent growth in all of our major wireless connectivity protocol. Security continues to be critical for the IoTs expansion and Silicon Labs has established a clear and unique leadership position in protecting IoT devices against bad actors.

In March, Silicon Labs became the world's first Silicon innovator to achieve PSA certified highest level of IoT hardware and software security. Our Secure Vault technology sets the standard for IoT security, effectively protecting against hardware and software attack. We've made strategic investments to ensure security as a core strength. Becoming the first company to achieve PSA level 3 certification is strong validation of our leadership role in securing the IoT.

In addition to delivering superior security in our high performance parts, we provide strong security in our battery optimized devices like the xG22, which just became the world's first wireless SoC to earn CCEF Level 3 Certification using the Diabetes Technology Society's DTSec security protection profile. DTSec sets the security standard for protecting personal and confidential healthcare data transmitted through connected devices.

In addition to becoming more secure the IoT is becoming more intelligent in areas such as motion detection, sound recognition, image classification and preventative maintenance. Developers innovating for these solutions faced obstacles and linking their machine learning models to real-world information. To help overcome these challenges, we have partnered with Edge Impulse to enable the integration of their tiny ML solution into our SoCs and MCUs. This is just one example of the ways that we are bringing the power of machine learning to developers of wireless edge devices.

Smart lighting continues to be a key growth driver for IoT business and we have a strong position in the lighting market, to enlarge part to our unique combination of best-in-class SoCs, and industry-leading portfolio. Our 15.4 mesh and bluetooth low energy products are deployed throughout the smart lighting industry, which is growing at a CAGR of 30%. A great example of this is our work with Yeelight, we recently launched a new smart LED light bulb with our BG21 Bluetooth SoC. This smart lighting products enables users to connect and control smart home devices directly from the Google Home app without the need for any other apps or software.

The exceptional user experiences our technology helps deliver are influencing the broader IoT ecosystem which will help more and more IoT products become mainstream. We are world leader in providing wireless connectivity solutions for the smart home, pushing the envelope to improve simplicity and ease of use. We recently collaborated with Allterco, to create the Shelly Motion, a new WiFi motion sensor with the world's lowest power consumption in mass production today.

Shelly Motion features up to 3-year battery life before recharging and is ideal for a wide range of motion sensing applications like lighting and security. Shelly Motion is another great example of our relentless focus on designing products specifically for the unique requirements of the IoT with built in compatibility with Alexa, Home Assistant, smart things and other 3rd-party home automation platforms. Our differentiated IoT product offerings are winning share and preferred by the marketplace versus competing products architected on repurposed technology not originally designed to meet the unique requirements of the IoT.

Turning now to Infrastructure and automotive. As we announced last week, we are divesting our I&A business to Skyworks Solutions with closing expected in Q3. This transaction delivers significant value to our shareholders and we are excited about INA's future under Skyworks. Onto results, we delivered first quarter I&A revenue growth, both on a sequential and year-on-year basis and saw a continued recovery in both timing and isolation product lines. The automotive market continues to see increasingly demanding requirements for timing solutions.

In the first quarter, we expanded our portfolio of automotive focused timing solutions with the introduction of new Smart clock features that actively monitor reference clocks to detect potential faults and provide built in clock redundancy to ensure safe and reliable operation. To help power emerging trends in the electric vehicle and industrial markets, we introduced a new gate driver Board and all in one isolation solution perfectly suited for the recently launched Wolfspeed Wolf PACK power modules. This new board delivers superior performance to efficiently drive and protect power modules employing any switch technology including advanced silicon carbide based modules used in the most demanding high power applications.

During the quarter, we bolstered our management team welcoming Dr. Manish Kothari as Vice President of Silicon Labs, India. Manish leads the company's newest and fastest-growing wireless development center in Hyderabad and will grow our wireless engineering talent, build scalable infrastructure and foster local and regional partnerships. Our Hyderabad Development Center is a result of our acquisition of Redpine signals one year ago, adding more than 200 engineers, with strong expertise in WiFi technology, over 75 WiFi patents and a number of highly innovative WiFi products to our portfolio.

The acquisition further solidified our position in the market. As the market leader in IoT wireless connectivity in the integration of the former Redpine signals team has gone very well. Under Manish' leadership we continue to hire world-class talent in Hyderabad as we build the region's top IoT Wireless Development Center.

As we shared last quarter, we have implemented an internal program to empower employees to form resource groups fostering a diverse inclusive workplace aligned with our organizational values. I'm pleased to share that we have formed 3 three employee resource groups, and an additional two are being developed. These groups are employee-led, represent a diversity of interests, and support our deep commitment to workplace equity and inclusion. Additionally, we have launched an Inclusive Lexicon Project to eliminate offensive terms commonly used in the tech industry, and replaced them with inclusive language in our corporate Lexicon.

In conclusion, our business is generating significant and strong momentum, with another quarter of record revenue, a growing opportunity pipeline, and strength in design win growth. We are now positioned to capitalize on the IoT opportunity in front of us with a singular focus. While supply chain constraints continue to impact our industry's ability to meet surging demand, we are still delivering upside results. We are collaborating with customers and ecosystems to deliver compelling new products, and we are enhancing our workforce by focusing on diversity, and expanding management talent.

We continue to lead the market in wireless connectivity for a vast array of intelligent solutions, and with a focused management structure we are poised to capture share, and lead the cutting edge of wireless connectivity. With the global economic recovery from the pandemic in full swing, we are very excited about capitalizing on the growing opportunities in front of us.

Thank you for your time and attention. Before we take your questions, I'd like to turn the call back to Austin Dean. Austin?

Austin Dean -- Investor Relations Manager

Thank you, Tyson. We would now like to open the call up for your questions. To accommodate as many people as possible before the market opens, we ask that you please limit your questions to one with one follow-up. Matt, back to you.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Our first question will come from Gary Mobley with Wells Fargo Securities. Please go ahead.

Gary Mobley -- Wells Fargo Securities, LLC -- Analyst

Good morning, guys. Thanks for taking my question. Wanted to ask a multi-part question about gross margin. It sounds as if you had a higher than expected mix of radio in IoT, which I believe is perhaps margin dilutive, but despite that you beat third quarter. I wonder if you can give some reason or rationale behind that? And then as it relates to the headwinds from higher input cost, does it impact your gross margin? Can you quantify the impact in the near-term? And as it relates to passing on the price increases where might you be getting some pushback from customers?

John Hollister -- Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Hi, Gary. This is John. On the first part of your question. As we talked about before, technology mix is relevant but what's also relevant is the end market and customer mix, and we did see strong results in the first quarter in our industrial and commercial part of the business. Metering was strong in Q1, which was constructive for IoT margins. As an example of that, looking at the input costs we don't to have a hard number to give you, but you clearly can see in a point or so of margin impacts, and as we work through our competitiveness in the market, and desire to grow share, we're continually assessing how to transfer that onto the customer base, and that's an ongoing process for us.

Gary Mobley -- Wells Fargo Securities, LLC -- Analyst

Appreciate that color. And in your presentation of last week, you outlined a goal of achieving roughly $650 million in sales for the IoT business, and you had mentioned in your prepared remarks that you expect continued supply chain constraints for at least a few more quarters. But I'm curious to know whether or not in that $650 million revenue expectation for IoT, you might have factored in, any capacity could strength extraneous to SLABs supply chain.

John Hollister -- Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, in the revenue guidance that we gave for IoT for the year, we are factoring in known supply chain constraints. So that is a supply constraint number.

Gary Mobley -- Wells Fargo Securities, LLC -- Analyst

Got you. All right. Thank you very much guys.

John Hollister -- Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Our next question will come from Blayne Curtis with Barclays. Please go ahead.

Blayne Curtis -- Barclays plc -- Analyst

Hey, good morning. Thanks for taking my question. Maybe just following up on Gary's question there. In the outlook for the year, you had IoT margins kind of 57, it seems like for the June guide infrastructure spend kind of flat for a bit, is up sharply. So maybe you could talk about that, and then specifically I guess IoT margins are 57, it seems like Infrastructure margins going down, maybe just talk about the mix there?

John Hollister -- Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, Blayne. First on the upside for infrastructure in Q2 we're seeing strength in Automotive, Timing and Isolation, sort of where you would expect that. So that's very positive for the I&A business. Great to see that, and similar dynamics that work with some input costs increasing their related to supply chain situation affecting INA, as well as IoT.

Blayne Curtis -- Barclays plc -- Analyst

Got you. And then maybe just a longer-term question, maybe hinting at maybe on Analyst Day but in the long-term targets, you kind of showed effective doubling of that 650 and IoT in the growth rate, I mean Tyson has been talking about IoT could maybe you can grow 30%, you're kind of there this year. Thought maybe can you put some timeframe to what that long-term is or maybe what kind of how you see the IoT CAGR going forward?

John Hollister -- Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, Blayne, we tried to articulate that in the deal call last week of identifying 20% CAGR opportunity over time here. So hopefully that can can give you a sense of the doubling time that could be achievable if we're able to sustain that, which we believe is possible. So, we did try to go ahead and call that out. This is a strong year for sure, and we have a lot of momentum in the business right now.

Blayne Curtis -- Barclays plc -- Analyst

All right.

Operator

Our next question will come from Craig Hettenbach with Morgan Stanley. Please go ahead.

Craig Hettenbach -- Morgan Stanley -- Analyst

Thanks. On the strength that you're seeing in the Wireless IoT in the quarter, as well as your expectations going forward, can you just talk about implications for market share and where you're seeing the best momentum?

Tyson Tuttle -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. Craig, this is Tyson. The -- we're seeing strength in wireless really across protocols, and across a number of different market segments. We outlined some of those things like lighting, industrial automation, retail, shelf tags, smart home, a lot of the mesh networking, a lot of the Bluetooth applications and things like Portable Medical. So it's kind of an across the board in terms of different applications in different wireless protocols where we're seeing the strength in wireless, and those are trends that are going to just continue year after year. If you think about IoT, it is a long-term trend. It's not just something that's going to happen in one area, and then dwindle away. The projections are that the IoT wireless markets will grow at a 15% CAGR over the next decade. And so our target of a 20% CAGR means that we will be gaining share over that timeframe while the market continues to grow.

Craig Hettenbach -- Morgan Stanley -- Analyst

Got it, thanks. And then just a follow-up question on tax, kind of going from that low to mid 20s on a combined basis. Anything to note on just the IoT piece from a tax implications longer term?

Tyson Tuttle -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, Craig. Similarly facing the end dynamics around the increase with the change in the tax law will be further refining that as we move to our continuing operations model, but a similar type of increase based on current law and I will add that. Obviously a lot's happening in DC right now. We're watching that carefully and the landscape could change depending on what happens with legislation.

Craig Hettenbach -- Morgan Stanley -- Analyst

Thanks.

Operator

Our next question will come from Raji Gill with Needham and Company. Please go ahead.

Rajvindra S. Gill -- Needham and Company -- Analyst

Yes, thank you. Just a question. If you did not have supply constraints related to IoT, any sense in terms of what the IoT growth rate would have been in 2021?

John Hollister -- Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, Raji, it's -- we're not able to provide a hard number to you, but suffice to say that we exited the first quarter as we did exited the fourth quarter with an unusually high amount of unmet demand. So it's...

Tyson Tuttle -- President and Chief Executive Officer

It would be a big number Raji.

Rajvindra S. Gill -- Needham and Company -- Analyst

Yeah.

Tyson Tuttle -- President and Chief Executive Officer

But we -- the entire industry is constrained, and we're working through that as we can.

Rajvindra S. Gill -- Needham and Company -- Analyst

And you talked about supply constraints lasting persisting for kind of several quarters. Any kind of insight or color in terms of how the industry is progressing in terms of supply and capacity. These are kind of lagging edge nodes where their supply constraints -- you kind of gave a somewhat of a timeframe, but in any sense in terms of what steps the industry is taking in order to try to increase the capacity particularly on these lagging edge notes?

Tyson Tuttle -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, so the industry is -- TSMC has announced a number of investments in mature technologies and this is really 28-nanometer and above. So, this is -- it's not the 3-nanometer and 5-nanometer and 7 nanometer at the advanced nodes. But what's happened is that a lot of the -- in addition to strong demand, we've also had the focus of all the capex into the advanced nodes. And then because Moore's Law is pushing the limits here, a lot of, a lot of products have gotten left behind in the n minus 1, n minus 2, n minus 3 nodes. And so that has also filled up the mainstream technologies. Right now, it's safe to assume that for the remainder of the year we are going to be in a supply constrained situation. There is incremental improvements that can be had, but it takes a little while to get other sources of supply qualified and certainly to the extent that we have to build new fabs and mainstream, which is not the way it used to work, it used to be that they would focus on advanced nodes and the mainstream nodes would empty out, but we're getting into a situation where the demand for semiconductors is exceeding that model and the slowing pace of Moore's Law migration is adding to that. So, it's -- I believe that this will persist into 2022, but certainly for the remainder of the year, we're going to be in a supply chain constrained situation.

Rajvindra S. Gill -- Needham and Company -- Analyst

And just for a follow-up, in terms of your long-term strategy in IoT you're pretty much dominating wireless by servicing all the different type of standards that are available there with your multi-protocol multi radio, SoC. Are there other connectivity technologies such as cellular, Massive IoT that you're considering, when you are now thinking about IoT and becoming kind of the leader in IoT going forward?

Tyson Tuttle -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, certainly we look at a lot of the other technologies in cellular. But I think when you, when you think about strategy and one of the things that we're accomplishing with the sale of our I&A Group is to obtain focus, to be able to focus on this massive opportunity in IoT. And I think even within IoT, it's very important that we focus on the most important things and that we don't get spread too thin. And one of the -- you look at the standards that we are addressing from WiFi, Bluetooth all the mesh networking, Z Wave, ZigBee, Thread and then all of the industrial proprietary protocols that we can also run those onto our chip, there is a massive opportunity for that. And if we focus and execute on our vision and continue to push that with -- into the next process technology nodes and to really build up our WiFi business and our Bluetooth business. We have a long runway of growth without having to necessarily add another protocol. And in fact, adding another protocol especially going after cellular could be seen as a distraction from the success in these other large area. So, it's something that we're keeping our eyes on, but also being very careful to make sure that we maintain that focus on what the really big prizes which is the standards that we're on is a massive growing market and we've got to make sure that we ensure success in that.

Rajvindra S. Gill -- Needham and Company -- Analyst

Appreciate it. Thank you.

Operator

Our next question will come from Matt Ramsay with Cowen. Please go ahead.

Matthew D. Ramsay -- Cowen Inc. -- Analyst

Thank you very much guys. Good morning. John, I wanted to ask a little bit about the -- after the I&A sale. The pro forma business and the concentration for the IoT business on distribution is that materially different than the combined company has been? I think my observation would be probably yes. And then secondly with the supply constraints, I imagine you're on books inventory and your inventory in the channel are below levels right now in the IoT franchise that you'd like to run that business at in a steady state basis. If you could talk a little bit about where the IoT business is from an inventory perspective versus what inventory might be, need to be rebuilt as we get back the supply demand parity at some point here? Thanks.

John Hollister -- Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, certainly on the first question, IoT is a relatively distribution heavy business with a broad base of customers, outstanding support from our distribution network. So, we expect that to be on the high distribution side of how we operate. And on the inventory question, you're right, channel inventory is lean and we'd like to see some build in the channel inventory levels and the IoT business would normally operate with a relatively higher level of inventory inside than the company average. You tend to see, faster turns on more vertically oriented businesses. With a broad-based business like IoT it makes more sense to carry a bit more inventory, and we're not there right now.

Matthew D. Ramsay -- Cowen Inc. -- Analyst

Got it. Thank you. Tyson and just a bigger picture question. And just -- I guess a reflection of some investor feedback I've gotten in the last week or so since the deal was announced. You look at the IoT franchise 20% growth going forward as you've outlined a $15 billion IoT TAM. I don't know, I would imagine you guys would agree that we're in the early innings of this IoT market phenomenon. And then you get $2 billion in the door that you've earmarked to give back to shareholders, I wonder what the debate has been within the management team and the board feedback from shareholders as to use of that proceeds. My observation is a bit of a scarcity value of high growth, quality and your market cap range in public companies. And I wonder if investors might ask the question what other uses of that cash could there be to grow the business further versus just returning it to shareholders? So any big picture thoughts that would be really helpful. Appreciate it.

Tyson Tuttle -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, I mean we're going to have a substantial cash balance here after completing the sale of I&A and you don't want to have cash sitting on the balance sheet and it's our belief, both the staff, my staff and the Board that returning that to shareholders is an important priority. That being said, we have a massive opportunity in front of us and the TAM will go to on the order of $10 billion plus and we want to ensure success. So, we will be focused on execution. I think as we execute the transaction and we move our I&A team over to Skyworks we've got optimization and execution within the company that is going to be very important for us to focus on. And there are a lot of efficiencies to be gained by having this pure play focus and both in terms of brand, in terms of culture, in terms of engineering execution, in terms of systems and we've got to make sure that we take full advantage of that and do not want to get distracted with an immediate acquisition.

I would also just add two other points, one is that with our narrowed focus on IoT that necessarily narrows the range of targets that we would potentially be interested in and certainly we've been active and done a number of acquisitions within the IoT area, but now that would be our pure focus in terms of M&A. And even after we return that money, we will have a substantial cash balance to continue that. So, I think overall the right message to send is that we're going return this either in the form of dividends or share repurchase. We're going to be getting feedback from our investors and welcome feedback on the mechanism and exactly how to deploy that, but we do think that that's the right thing to do, and really focus on execution and optimization around our IoT business.

Matthew D. Ramsay -- Cowen Inc. -- Analyst

Thanks, Tyson. Appreciate it.

Operator

Our next question will come from Srini Pajjuri with SMBC Nikko Securities. Please go ahead.

Srini Pajjuri -- SMBC Nikko Securities -- Analyst

Thank you, good morning guys. John, on the guidance for IoT being flattish for next quarter. If I take the run rate, I think you pretty much get to your low-end of your $640 million to $660 million forecast for the year. So is that, how you're thinking about the second half? And also if you could remind us if there is any seasonality to this business that we should think about and how that might change as you get more supply over the next few quarters?

John Hollister -- Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes., Srini, you bet. We're going to see if we can drive some sequential growth in the second half. That's certainly possible, but I think you're thinking about it the right way directionally and, yeah, there's really less seasonality in the IoT business than some of our other product categories, like broadcast video for example that which has more of a consumer focus. You do tend to see the general first quarter softness that's simply common in the industry, but apart from that, it's more of a broad-based cycular trend.

Srini Pajjuri -- SMBC Nikko Securities -- Analyst

Got it. And then just going back to the I&A divestiture, could you remind us, some of the mechanics, John. You said you expect to close the deal in Q3. And when do you anticipate receiving the cash, and how soon after that do you anticipate making the decision about the potential usages of the cash, whether it's a buyback or dividend or something else?

John Hollister -- Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. Srini. We expect to receive the cash at closing, and the capital deployment will be after that. We will be consulting with the Board further, as well as taking input from investors as Tyson just indicated. Depending on the technique that's finally put to work here that can affect the time horizon, I think where we can measure that months and quarters of time, not years of time that's sort of how we're thinking about it.

Srini Pajjuri -- SMBC Nikko Securities -- Analyst

Got it. And then one last one on the Redpine acquisition, I think last time we spoke, you said the progress has been pretty much as expected. If you could just remind us how that's progressing and what are some of the milepost that you are kind of looking at, and if there is any revenue contribution that you want to highlight? I think that would be helpful. Thank you.

Tyson Tuttle -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. We believe that we are on track to the the targets that we set out with the Redpine acquisition and I would say we talked in the script about Manish Kothari joining as VP of India. So we are investing in that design center, want to make that the leading wireless design center in India. And we have a strong team there, over 200 people with experience in WiFi, continuing to integrate those products into our platform and into our roadmap, both from a hardware and a software perspective. Continuing to execute on the next generations of WiFi technology, and so we expect to be bringing those new more optimized products out into the market here over the next year.

So it's overall very pleased with the team, very pleased with the technology, and really the most important thing is that we take that, integrate into our platform, and make that accessible to a broader range of applications and customers. And I think that will allow us to really turbocharge the WiFi revenue beyond what we talked about initially.

Srini Pajjuri -- SMBC Nikko Securities -- Analyst

Got it. Thanks, Tyson.

Operator

Our next question will come from Tore Svanberg with Stifel. Please go ahead.

Tore Svanberg -- Stifel Financial Corporation -- Analyst

Yes, thank you and congratulations on the revenues and also to Matt and Daniel for their promotions. First question is on the PSA sort of a level 3, that you achieved with Secure Vault. Tyson, you're the first of the company that gets that. Could you just elaborate a little bit on how important that is and how do you intend to monetize the security here? Whether it's monetizing it itself, perhaps getting higher content or higher ASPs, with your IoT product?

Tyson Tuttle -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, I mean the PSA certification, was a pretty big deal in the industry, in terms of really hitting the the top levels of security that are required, and this is both software and hardware, making these devices kind of impenetrable from hackers and end point attacks, and that sort of thing. And so we've built in a number of features into the chip, and also the way we've designed the security architecture, and the software and the way it connects to the cloud, and exchanges keys and in all of that. So it's the entire -- we've thought about kind of the end-to-end security, all the way from the silicon, all the way to the cloud, and are implementing that in our Series 2 devices, and then certainly will be further enhancing that in our Series 3 devices.

In terms -- once you have security at this level, and you can think about it like your credit card. You have the little chip on your credit card, or within your phone, you have a SIM card. In IoT each device will have a unique ID, and that general concept, not only can you communicate securely, but you can address those devices in terms of updates, or in terms of enabling functionality, and those create additional revenue streams. And we are seeing a small amount of revenue from security and device management and that stuff today, but that is something that over time as we roll this out, and as we mature our software stacks, and get further penetrated into a lot of these applications we believe that, that can be an additional revenue stream. It's not something that we're necessarily forecasting yet at this point, but the ability to address these devices individually in a completely secure way, and to have updates and functionality enablement is something that we are looking very carefully at.

Tore Svanberg -- Stifel Financial Corporation -- Analyst

Very good and as my follow-up, I know you work with several different foundries today. But as you go through the divestiture does that really change in the material way, or do you expect to continue to work with the same foundries?

Tyson Tuttle -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, actually the supply chain for our Infrastructure and Automotive business in our IoT businesses were actually somewhat different. So the fact that we are divesting I&A actually simplifies our supply chain to a significant degree, and that is one of the benefits that we get. So there were a number of foundries that were used on the I&A side, that are not used on the IoT side. We have a very close relationship with TSMC, a 25-year partnership with those guys, and they've done a good job for us. While at same time, everybody is struggling with capacity. And so we're looking at additional relationships there, that could expand capacity, and also continuing to work with TSMC to ensure that they are making the investments, and we have access to sufficient capacity to support our growth.

Tore Svanberg -- Stifel Financial Corporation -- Analyst

That's good. Thank you, Tyson.

Tyson Tuttle -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Our next question will come from Bill Peterson with JP Morgan. Please go ahead.

Bill Peterson -- JPMorgan Chase & Co. -- Analyst

Yeah. Hi. Good morning, and thanks for taking the questions. I was hoping, can you help quantify where the lead times are currently? Are they extending from the last quarter? Is there a difference between lead times between IoT and industrial and the Infrastructure and Automotive businesses?

John Hollister -- Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Hey, Bill. This is John. Yeah. Lead times are definitely extended out. I mean we've had in the past lead times running around seven weeks or so of order book coverage. We're looking on average now of half a year even on some product lines longer than that. And that's pretty well across the board on that across the various businesses that we have.

Bill Peterson -- JPMorgan Chase & Co. -- Analyst

Okay. And the second part is somewhat multipart question on IoT following our earlier question, of the 25% to 30% growth expected. I guess where do you see more contribution from end markets, home end consumer, industrial and commercial? You talked about some of the drivers but I guess with supply constraints are you focusing more on long lived industrial or commercial focused? And I guess it's kind of longer term and sort of one reporting segment but will you report more granularly on the type of let's say protocol growth or market growth? I guess, anything that can help measure the progress on your share gains in relative performance versus peers?

John Hollister -- Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, Bill. This is John again. We're seeing consistent growth in the two areas, between the home and consumer -- home and life and industrial and commercial, and part of our part of our strategy here in the upside performance with the supply limitations is to be fair and really treat customers well in this scenario. We have a long tail of smaller customers. So we need to be mindful of, as we allocate scarce capacity and that's something that we're also doing as we also deliver upside with larger customers. So we have to be mindful of those things. And as far as the forward reporting, we're working through that and we'll have more to report later on exactly how we're going to break that out going forward starting up around the next call.

Bill Peterson -- JPMorgan Chase & Co. -- Analyst

Thanks.

Operator

[Operator Instructions]. Our next question will come from Alessandra Vecchi with William Blair. Please go ahead.

Alessandra Vecchi -- William Blair -- Analyst

Just as a clarification question on the IoT side of the business. Any color on how we should think about microcontroller growth going forward over the next few years?

Tyson Tuttle -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Alessandra, this is, Tyson. The big growth in IoT is on the wireless side. So this last quarter we were 44% percent up in wireless year-on-year. And if you just look at the mix between MCU and wireless, the mix is going to more and more shift toward wireless over time. We continue to make incremental investments in our MCU portfolio on the 8-bit side have been refreshing some of that and see good opportunity on the 8-bit side. And we also -- you have to remember that all of our wireless chips have a microcontroller in them. And so to the extent that those can be redeployed into the microcontroller market we opportunistically sell those devices with microcontroller functionality in cases where you might need a microcontroller, as well as a wireless chip or something like that. So we do see MCUs as an important business onto itself, but also as an important component of wireless. So in reality, all of our IoT businesses microcontrollers. But the attach rate of wireless to those products is going to continue to rise as we see the proliferation of the wireless connected IoT.

Alessandra Vecchi -- William Blair -- Analyst

That helps. And then maybe just one for John. While somewhat of a moot point but until the model transition over to IoT only should we still be thinking about roughly that 7% opex growth on a combined basis that you gave as annual guidance last quarter?

John Hollister -- Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, Alex. Thanks for the question. You know with the upside in revenue we are seeing some increase in variable compensation and 9% to 10% is a more rational view on OpEx, given the strong upside revenue that we're seeing.

Alessandra Vecchi -- William Blair -- Analyst

Makes sense. Perfect, that's it for me. Thank you.

Operator

This concludes our question-and-answer session. I would like to turn the conference back over to Austin Dean for any closing remarks.

Austin Dean -- Investor Relations Manager

Thank you, Matt, and thank you all for joining us this morning. That concludes today's call.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Duration: 51 minutes

Call participants:

Austin Dean -- Investor Relations Manager

John Hollister -- Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Tyson Tuttle -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Gary Mobley -- Wells Fargo Securities, LLC -- Analyst

Blayne Curtis -- Barclays plc -- Analyst

Craig Hettenbach -- Morgan Stanley -- Analyst

Rajvindra S. Gill -- Needham and Company -- Analyst

Matthew D. Ramsay -- Cowen Inc. -- Analyst

Srini Pajjuri -- SMBC Nikko Securities -- Analyst

Tore Svanberg -- Stifel Financial Corporation -- Analyst

Bill Peterson -- JPMorgan Chase & Co. -- Analyst

Alessandra Vecchi -- William Blair -- Analyst

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