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Omega Healthcare Investors (NYSE:OHI)
Q2 2021 Earnings Call
Aug 03, 2021, 10:00 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:


Operator

Good day and welcome to Omega Healthcare Investors second-quarter 2021 earnings call. [Operator instructions] At this time, I would like to turn the conference over to Michele Reber. Please go ahead.

Michele Reber -- Senior Director of Asset Management

Thank you, and good morning. With me today are Omega's CEO, Taylor Pickett; COO, Dan Booth; CFO, Bob Stephenson; chief corporate development officer, Steven Insoft; and Megan Krull, senior vice president of operations. Comments made during this conference call that are not historical facts may be Forward-Looking Statements, such as statements regarding our financial projections, dividend policy, portfolio restructuring, rent payments, financial condition or prospects of our operators, contemplated acquisitions, dispositions or transitions and our business and portfolio outlook generally. These forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties, which may cause actual results to differ materially.

Please see our press releases and our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including, without limitation, our most recent report on Form 10-K, which identify specific factors that may cause actual results or events to differ materially from those described in forward-looking statements. During the call today, we will refer to some non-GAAP financial measures, such as NAREIT FFO, adjusted FFO, FAD, and EBITDA. Reconciliations of these non-GAAP measures to the most comparable measure under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, as well as an explanation of the usefulness of the non-GAAP measures are available under the Financial Information section of our website at www.omegahealthcare.com and in the case of NAREIT FFO and adjusted FFO, in our recently issued press release. In addition, certain operator coverage and financial information that we discuss is based on data provided by our operators that has not been independently verified by Omega.

I will now turn the call over to Taylor.

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Michelle. Good morning and thank you for joining our second-quarter 2021 earnings conference call. Today, I will discuss our second-quarter financial results and industry occupancy and labor trends. We continue to post strong quarterly results with second-quarter adjusted FFO of $0.85 per share and funds available for distribution of $0.81 per share.

We have maintained our quarterly dividend of $0.67 per share, and the dividend payout ratio remains conservative at 79% of adjusted FFO and 83% of funds available for distribution. Our liquidity and debt maturity ladder have never been stronger as our operators face the uncertain timing of occupancy recovery and widespread labor shortages. As we have discussed in previous calls and investor presentations, the combination of significant occupancy declines and a tight labor market with increasing wages and a shortage of staff has started creating liquidity issues for certain operators. In June, we had an operator representing 3% of annual revenue inform Omega that they would be unable to pay rent due to both occupancy and labor issues.

It is possible that additional operators could experience similar cashflow stress. Turning to occupancy and labor trends. Since January, occupancy has improved every month, and it is likely that this trend will continue. However, in general, we need occupancy to return over 80% in order to meaningfully mitigate the cash flow reductions from a pandemic.

At the same time that occupancy has started to improve the labor shortage has created two significant issues. First, a number of facilities have self-imposed admission bans if they cannot staff at clinically appropriate levels. Therefore, even though there is an opportunity to increase census based on demand in the market, these facilities have elected to limit new admissions due to staffing limitations. Second wage rates continue to climb.

These labor cost increases are particularly difficult to manage in states with limited or no COVID-19 reimbursement release. Additionally, it appears that these wage increases may create a new baseline wage rate going forward. We strongly believe in the positive long-term prospects for our operating partners as occupancy rebounds and the aging demographics drive increasing demand for skilled nursing facilities. We remain hopeful that the Federal Government and the States will provide additional near-term support to the skilled nursing facility and assisted living industry as we work to overcome the ongoing challenges from the pandemic.

Finally, I again thank our operating partners and in particular, the frontline caregivers and staff who have cared for the tens of thousands of residents within our facilities. I will now turn the call over to Bob.

Bob Stephenson -- Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Taylor and good morning, turning to our financials for the second quarter. Our NAREIT FFO for the quarter is $181 million or $0.74 per share on a diluted basis as compared to $186 million or $0. 80 per diluted share for the second quarter of 2020. Our adjusted FFO was $207 million or $0.85 per share for the quarter and excludes several items as outlined in our adjusted FFO reconciliation to net income found in our earnings release and our supplemental and also on our website.

Revenue for the second quarter was approximately $257 million before adjusting for the non-recurring items. As previously disclosed, in June an operator informed us, it would be unable to make its contractual rental payments for the foreseeable future. As such we revised our revenue recognition treatment for that operator to cash basis rather than straight line accounting methods. As a result, we recorded a $17.4 million reduction to rental income related to the write down of straight line receivables.

We collected over 99% of our contractual rent mortgage and interest payments for the second quarter and 98% for the month of July with a decrease resulting from the one operator just referenced. Our G&A expense was $9 million for the second quarter of 2021, and slightly better than our estimated quarterly G&A expense of between $9.5 million and $10.5 million. Interest expense for the quarter was $56 million. Our balance sheet remains strong and we have continued to take steps in 2021 to further improve our liquidity, capital staff, maturity ladder and overall borrowing costs.

On the debt side on April 30, we closed on a new $1.45 billion unsecured credit facility and a $50 million unsecured term loan that both mature in April of 2025. At June 30, we had no outstanding borrowings under our credit facility and had $100 million in cash. In March we issued $700 million of 3.25% senior notes due April, 2033. Our note issuance was leveraged neutral as proceeds were used to repurchase through a tender offer $350 million of 4.375% notes due in 2023 and to repay LIBOR base borrowing.

We have no bond maturities until August of 2023. On the equity side in May, we issued a new $1 billion ATM program. In the second quarter, we issued 4.1 million shares of common stock through a combination over ATM and our dividend reinvestment and common stock purchase plan generating $154 million in cash proceeds. Year to date, we have issued 6.2 million common shares, generating $231 million in cash proceeds.

We continue to use our equity currency via our ATM to gradually deliver, with our funded debt to adjusted annualize EBITDA at approximately 4.9 times and our fixed charge coverage ratio at 4.5 times as of June 30. While, we believe our action today provide us with flexibility to weather a potential prolonged impact of COVID-19 on our business. It also provides significant liquidity to fund potential acquisitions. In the second half of 2021, we will continue to evaluate any additional steps that maybe needed to further enhance our liquidity.

I will now turn the call over to Dan.

Dan Booth -- Chief Operating OFficer

Thanks, Bob. Good morning, everyone. As of June 30, 2021, Omega had an operating asset portfolio of 949 facilities with over 96,000 operating beds. These facilities were spread across 65 third-party operators and located within 42 states in the United Kingdom.

Trailing 12-months operator, EBITDARM and EBITDAR coverage for our core portfolio as of March 31, 2021, decreased to 1.8 and 1.44 times respectively, versus 1.86 and 1.5 times respectively for the trailing 12-months period ended December 31, 2020. During the first quarter of 2021, our operators cumulatively recorded approximately $74 million in federal stimulus funds, as compared to approximately $115 million recorded during the fourth quarter. Trailing 12-months operator, EBITDARM and EBITDAR coverage would have decreased during the first quarter of 2021 to 1.24 and 0.9 times respectively, as compared to 1.38 and 1.04 times respectively for the fourth quarter when excluding the benefit of any federal stimulus funds. EBITDAR coverage for the stand-alone quarter ended March 31, 2021 for our core portfolio was 1.17 times including federal stimulus and 0.83 times excluding the 74 million of federal stimulus funds.

This compares to the stand-alone fourth quarter of 1.33 times and 0.78 times with and without the $115 million of federal stimulus funds, respectively. Based upon what Omega has received in terms of occupancy reporting for July to-date, occupancy has continued to improve averaging approximately 75.7%, up from a low of 72.3% in January. Turning to portfolio matters. As Taylor previously mentioned.

In June, we had an operator representing approximately $30 million or 3% of annual revenue informed Omega, that the June rent of approximately $2.5 million would not be paid, and that future rent payments would not be remitted in the coming months. The operator has asserted that the COVID pandemic, along with its associated challenges, including census declines and labor shortages, were the primary drivers their liquidity predicament. We are an active ongoing discussions with this operator to determine what we hope will be a consensual restructure of their portfolio. The restructure may result in either releasing facilities or outright sales of part or all of the portfolio.

At this time, it is too early to predict the ultimate outcome of these discussions. Turning to new investments. On June 1, 2021, Omega provided $6.4 million of mortgage financing to an existing operator. The loan is secured by two nursing facilities located in Ohio and bears an initial interest rate of 10.5%.

Turning to subsequent events. On July 1, 2021, Omega provided $66 million of mortgage financing to an existing operator. The loan is secured by mortgages on six nursing facilities located in Ohio and bare initial interest rate of 10.5%. Separately, on July 14, 2021, Omega completed a $9.5 million purchase lease transaction for two care homes in the United Kingdom.

The facilities were added to an existing operator's master lease with an initial cash yield of 8% with 2.5% escalator. Year to date, Omega has made new investments totally $722 million, including $48 million for capital expenditures. Turning to dispositions. During the second quarter of 2021, Omega divested six facilities for $12.4 million.

As of June 30, Omega has divested a total of 30 facilities for approximately $200 million. I will now turn the call over to Megan.

Megan Krull -- Senior Vice President, Operations

Thanks Dan, and good morning, everyone. In positive news last week, CMS issued it is final payment rule, which includes a 1.2% rate increase beginning October 1st. But more importantly, delays the proposed 5% cut related to PDPM. In the proposed rule issued earlier this year, CMS had a highlighted the fact that PDPM rather than being budget neutral instead led to an unintended 5% payment increase and that a rate cut would need to occur.

That rate cut in the final rule has been pushed out one year, which is welcome news to the industry as a whole, especially as it continues to recover from a pandemic. Moving on to COVID. Last quarter, we highlighted the fact that, there was approximately $24.5 billion of unallocated funds left in the provider release fund, which number excludes money returned by providers, which we believe could be substantial. Since then, none of those funds have been allocated and we are still in a wait-and-see mode as to what benefits the long-term care industry will receive.

Thankfully, a handful of states have announced new continue for increased stimulus for the long-term care industry, such as Michigan and Pennsylvania. However, states work through how they plan spend funds received from the American Rescue Act. It is still too soon to tell what the ultimate impact will be on our operators or the industry as a whole. What we do now is that, the industry continues to need government support, especially in light of the Delta variant and the potential impact that it could have on what was already expected to be a slow long-term recovery.

While the overall impact of the vaccine has been strong with cases at the end of June at less than 250, resident and employees across 125 of our buildings, we did see an uptick as of last week's monthly reporting at slightly less than 500 cases across approximately 153 of our building. Operators are preparing themselves to deal with the potential rise in cases that could lead to increase visitation restrictions, and with vaccination rates for employees still running low at less than 60% at best, the staffing shortages and self-imposed admissions spans that Taylor mentioned earlier, could be exacerbated should large employee outbreaks occur. Both of these have the potential to slow, but hopefully not stall, the occupancy progress that is being made. All of that said, the vaccination rate of residents at close to 80% is a bright spot.

While occupancy growth may continue to be no more than a slow, steady climb, the infection risks to the vaccinated resident population appears to be low or at very least not fail. And therefore the industry should be able to avoid in large part, the devastating clinical effects and associated expenses that led them through 2020 and the early part of 2021. Day-in and day-out, our operators care for a particularly vulnerable segment of the population. This has never been more evident than during the pandemic.

And early federal assistance recognized that fact. For now, we hope that the Federal Government finds a renewed commitment to this space and states that hadn't stepped up to provide support with the additional funds that they have now received. I will now turn the call over to Steven.

Steven Insoft -- Chief Corporate Development Officer

Thanks, Megan. And thanks to everyone on the line for joining today. In spite of New York, our ALS Memory Care high rise at Second Avenue and 93rd Street in Manhattan leased to an operated by Maplewood Senior Living opened at the end of March. And is in the midst of lease up.

Lease up momentum has been solid in-line with our underwriting and expectations. The COVID-19 pandemic poses certain challenges unique to senior housing operators, including increased costs, the challenges of managing COVID positive patients in meaningful practical limitations on admissions. While they very much appreciate the help we have received private pay senior housing operators have not seen the level of government support provided to other areas of senior care. Along with continued pandemic related challenges, we saw small but measured occupancy improvements to our senior housing portfolio throughout the second quarter.

We have seen evidence of stabilization strengthening of census in certain markets. Our Maplewood portfolio which is concentrated in the early effective Metro New York and Boston markets saw meaningful census erosion early in the pandemic, with second-quarter 2020 census hitting a low point of 80.4% in early June of 2020. That said their portfolio occupancy level has returned to 87.6% in June of 2021. Including the land in CIT, at the end of the first-quarter Omega's senior housing portfolio total 2.2 billion of investment on our balance sheet.

All of our senior housing assets are in triple net master leases. Including our 24 recently acquired Brookdale assets. Our overall senior housing investment comprises 155 assisted living, independent living in memory care assets in the U.S. and UK.

This portfolio, excluding the 24 Brookdale properties on a stand-alone basis had its trailing 12-months EBITDAR lease coverage for six basis points to 1.02 times at the end of the first quarter. With COVID outbreaks having affected different markets at various times this decreasing performance was to be expected. Rising vaccination rates among residents and staff are a critical step to restoring occupancy performance. While we remain constructive about the prospects of senior housing, the COVID-19 outbreak has warranted a far more selective approach to development.

While we make further progress on our existing ongoing developments, we continue to work with our operators on strategically investment and our existing assets. We invested 31.1 million in the second quarter in new construction and strategically investment. 19.5 million of this investment is predominantly related to our active construction projects. The remaining 11.6 million of this investment was related to our ongoing portfolio capex reinvestment program.

I will now open the call for questions.

Questions & Answers:


Operator

[Operator instructions] Today's first question comes from Jonathan Hughes with Raymond James. Please proceed.

Jonathan Hughes -- Raymond James -- Analyst

Hi, there. Good morning. A question on kind of operator in news disclosure. If you do have more operators come to you in the future saying, they are having issues with paying rent and say within your top 15 operator lists, how will you disclose that going forward? Will you kind of wait until the quarterly earnings releases or do press releases inter quarter, like we saw in June ahead of NAREIT? I'm just trying to get a better sense of, and understand how we can monitor operator health and new development, hopefully on a more real-time basis.

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Fair enough, John. As you know, it is pretty nuanced when you start to have discussions with operators. And So some of the timing is you just have to work through some of those issues.

But I will tell you the one thing, we will be certain of is that we don't have selective disclosure. So to the extent that, we are talking to investors about any potential issues, you will see disclosures before we have those conversations, as we are talking to investors all the time. So I would think it would be relatively timely from our perspective.

Jonathan Hughes -- Raymond James -- Analyst

OK. That is great. And then maybe talk about Florida and Texas. Those are your two largest states in terms of exposure.

They are also two states that have not seen as much. I think government support as maybe others during the pandemic and even pre-pandemic. Can you just talk about the reimbursement rate and government support outlook for those two states and then maybe also update us on the daybreak transitions in Texas.

Dan Booth -- Chief Operating OFficer

So Texas early on in the pandemic actually had an add-on to its Medicaid rate of $19 per day, and it is continued to-that add-on has continued. They have recently extended and again, I believe it runs through October of this year. So that has been hugely helpful and attracts kind of the federal emergency plan. So we would hope that if the federal emergency plan continues, the Federal Act, the Texas Medicaid add-on would continue as well.

The State of Florida has offered no such systems. They have not added anything to the Medicaid rate. They have not offered any supplemental payments. So that has produced a situation in Florida that is becoming increasingly dire, I would say, because there has been no add-on and now we are seeing patients spikes with the health.

Daybreak, we finalize releasing or selling all those assets in the second quarter, I believe most of them were on in the first quarter. So there is no more daybreak as far as we are concerned, all those assets have been distributed the most, other operators either existing or new and/or sold to third parties.

Jonathan Hughes -- Raymond James -- Analyst

OK. And daybreak transitions, that was converted at some events to where daybreak was before.

Dan Booth -- Chief Operating OFficer

No, but they were in line with what we had projected.

Jonathan Hughes -- Raymond James -- Analyst

That is right. OK. What is it going to take for Florida to kind of realize maybe they do need to give some more support? I guess I could drive to Tallahassee. But, just curious if there has been any discussions among both the lobbying organizations, and just if there is any progress on that or if it is still pretty quiet.

Dan Booth -- Chief Operating OFficer

No. It has been quite, that is for sure. There has been a huge push from the operators, lobbyist, et cetera for some labor even in Florida. And there is no eminent expectation, but I think that continues to gain momentum and we are hopeful that we see something out of state of -.

Jonathan Hughes -- Raymond James -- Analyst

OK. Last one for me. There was an announcement, you announced the addition of a new Director to your board yesterday. Can you just provide some additional details around this? Thanks.

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes, Jonathan. I will ask Matthew to cover that.

Matthew Gourmand -- Senior Vice President,Corporate Strategy & Investor Relations

Hey, Jonathan. So Ed Lowenthal is retiring as a board member at the end of his current term. While we have added the board member for a number of more months, this is probably a good opportunity to publicly thank him for his over 25-years of exceptional service as a board member. While we are sad to be losing Ed, we are also very happy that Dr.

Lisa Egbuonu-Davis has agreed to join our board. For those of you who didn't see the 8-K filing, a little additional background. Dr. Egbuonu-Davis has literally decades of healthcare experience as both a physician and as a healthcare executive, where she is primarily focused on patient centric businesses.

So as you can imagine, her experience and her nuance understanding of the healthcare continuum will be extremely helpful for Omega as we continue to navigate the evolving landscape. So we are excited that she has joined the board, and we look forward to many years of working with them.

Jonathan Hughes -- Raymond James -- Analyst

Alright. Thanks very much. I appreciate the time.

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

Thanks Jon.

Operator

Our next question comes from Connor Siversky with Berenberg. Please proceed.

Connor Siversky -- Berenberg Capital Markets -- Analyst

Good morning, everybody. I appreciate the prepared remarks. Wow Matthew appearance on the call today. First question on acquisitions, I mean, it seems relatively quiet on the essentially-yet some publications, some of the industry journals are suggesting even an acceleration of activity, maybe from private investors.

So I'm wondering is, from Omega's perspective, is this a cost of capital issue or are they just not really attractive opportunities in the space or is there a new kind of competitive element floating around out there that may not have been present prior?

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes, I mean, I hate to sound like a broken record, but the acquisition environment just remains choppy, I mean, we are still seeing some deals, a fair amount of deals, we are actually seeing activity pick up in the UK, but once again, it is choppy, we continue to partner with our operators to do transactions. There hasn't been a lot of distress situations that have presented themselves that haven't gone in distress prices. There has been distressed real estate out there. But actually, it stood up, I think we are seeing stuff out there.

But it is not like there is a whole landslide of new opportunities to start.

Connor Siversky -- Berenberg Capital Markets -- Analyst

OK, appreciate the color there. And then more of a broader question on operations in general. So there is some commentary out there that certain operators are looking to take on higher acuity patients. So I'm wondering at a high level, maybe Megan can jump in here, how that affects the cost structure on a per patient basis.

And then if this dynamic is to turn into a trend across the whole industry, I mean, how could this look, in terms of the rate changes in years to come?

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

I mean, there has been a push for higher acuity patients, obviously, right that has been going on for decades. Relatively healthy folks are being treated at home or in assisted living settings or otherwise generally, other settings. So that has been ongoing. I haven't seen any dramatic change in that as of late.

It has just been a very, very, very slow evolution and we don't see anything material in that respect.

Connor Siversky -- Berenberg Capital Markets -- Analyst

OK, thanks for that. And last one from me, I apologize, if I missed the detail here. But on the dividend it seems like the payout ratio remains relatively comfortable even with the degree of lost trend. So I'm wondering how you guys feel about it at a high level and maybe what are the payout ratio bands you are looking to work in the near future and whether or not you would be willing to let that climb above a 100% for the short-term, if necessary.

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Unfortunately Conner we have never had to deal with the above a 100% from a board perspective. Several years ago, we got it to the 90% range, and we are comfortable with that because we can look forward and know we are going to get back into a more normalized range as we transitioned properties like Daybreak, we spoke about earlier. So I think for us, it really comes down to what is the outlook, and a good example would be the operator we are talking about that start pay us in June, part of the issue for them is the payback of the Medicare advanced payments, which has created some liquidity concerns but those assets are really desirable.

So as we look long-term, we don't think there will be any meaningful impact on our cash flow streams. So that is an example of the type of thing we look at and say on a core basis do we need to do anything with the dividend, but we know ultimately we are going to be in good shape. Hopefully that is enough color.

Connor Siversky -- Berenberg Capital Markets -- Analyst

Yes. That is very helpful. I will leave it there. Thank you.

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

The next question comes from Joshua Dennerlein with Bank of America. Please proceed.

Joshua Dennerlein -- Berenberg Capital Markets -- Analyst

Yes. Good morning, everyone. I hope you are doing well. I guess just curious on the operator who came to you in June about having trouble paying the rent.

Just any kind of additional color you can provide on like maybe what was going on operationally, was it unique to that tenant or maybe something within that broader region that we should be watching?

Dan Booth -- Chief Operating OFficer

No. I don't think there is anything specific. I think the general items that Taylor mentioned, it is stress on occupancy and huge stress on labor, which is compounding the occupancy issue, they can't staff a facility adequately to provide the clinical needs of the residents. So it is really built from clearly the combination of those two events.

And then they had also seen-through COVID, they have seen a fairly high rate of folks take a deal. So that compounded the situation. But beyond that, there was nothing else specific.

Joshua Dennerlein -- Berenberg Capital Markets -- Analyst

OK. And by taking out, you mean the staff or the residents?

Dan Booth -- Chief Operating OFficer

It is both.

Joshua Dennerlein -- Berenberg Capital Markets -- Analyst

Both. OK. And then speaking of staff, I guess, just kind of curious, are operators starting to kind of incentivize their employees to get vaccinated that 60% uptakes seems pretty disappointing. And then how are you guys thinking about expiration of the extended UI benefits? I think it rolls off everywhere in September.

Should that be a help at all?

Megan Krull -- Senior Vice President, Operations

Yes. I mean, from a vaccination standpoint, the employees, it is still relatively low and our operators have been trying to incentivize them from the beginning. So that is monetary incentivizing, and also trying to educate them with local leaders within the community. So we are starting to see some uptick, but I don't know that we are going to be anything substantial.

That said, with the Delta variant, we are hearing that, more staff are interested in taking the vaccine. So that might help it to pick up a bit as well. In terms of the unemployment benefits, I think that will be a big help at the unemployment benefits go away, and we can get people back to where-help with the staffing shortages. Definitely.

Joshua Dennerlein -- Berenberg Capital Markets -- Analyst

OK. Awesome. Thanks for the color.

Operator

Your next question comes from Nick Joseph with Citi. Please proceed.

Nick Joseph -- Citi -- Analyst

Thanks. I was hoping to get more color on the potential watch list for any other tenants that are getting close to having issues paying rent?

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

So I mean, I don't think our watch list has changed much. We have got those operators who are under one times coverage, but usually there is a secondary source of repayment associated with those operators. So those are mitigated, the federal stimulus money certainly is running out. So I think it is a little bit operator, but it is a little bit of geography too in states that are-they have another, huge rebound of the Delta variance, those are the ones that are going to get hit hardest, and the ones that are probably most susceptible, liquidity issues.

So we are keeping an eye on that, the incidence rates of the viruses followed, the incidence rates in counties or the communities in which they are in so it hasn't necessarily transferred over into the nursing home side yet. But we are watching those communities, particularly in Florida, in the south, where we are seeing pretty quick upward trends and the virus, and looking to see whether that, in fact, wasted the nursing homes having to pick up the virus. So those kind of things are what we keep a close eye on.

Nick Joseph -- Citi -- Analyst

Thanks, I appreciate it. And then as you think about the pressures on labor, obviously COVID has kind of wrecked havoc on margins, but when you think about pre-COVID, how much ability was there for labor costs to rise before there would really cause an issue from a margin perspective?

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

There is a fair amount of room, Nick. I think the best way to think about it is 2% or 3% wage inflation, would move coverage, a few basis points. Now, we are seeing areas where the wage inflation is far greater than 7% to 8%. So that is, obviously some additional basis points.

But in terms of general coverage at a one three, if we are not going to see a scenario where labor takes them to one or one, one that would be really meaningful changes in labor. That being said, the big drivers we have talked about the past is getting occupancy because each incremental resident provides pretty substantial cash flow that is really where the focus needs to be. So operators will find labor and they will pay what the market needs to clear labor and that will impact coverages, but it won't change the viability of the vast majority operators to pair around.

Nick Joseph -- Citi -- Analyst

Thanks.

Operator

The next question comes from Daniel Bernstein with Capital One. Please proceed.

Daniel Bernstein -- Capital One Securities -- Analyst

Thanks. Good morning. Just wanted to go back to Florida, I mean are there any occupancy trends that you have seen so far with the surge in the COVID virus down there? I mean, you are about six weeks into the Delta virus, I guess surge in Florida, it sounded like cases have gone up a little bit within facilities. But has there been any kind of occupancy trend impact thus far?

Megan Krull -- Senior Vice President, Operations

I don't think we have seen anything from a state perspective. But certainly, buildings that have smaller outbreaks are going to have occupancy trending down, but we haven't seen anything yet overall in this scene.

Daniel Bernstein -- Capital One Securities -- Analyst

OK. And then the labor shortages and wage pressure across the spectrum within the labor pool for facilities, nursing, caretakers, just all levels of labor within the facility or is it concentrated more in the caretaker side or concentrating more on the labor shortage on the nursing side? Just trying to understand whether, I guess the nuance of where the labor issues are.

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

You know it is interesting. We have had operators point out in particular, nursing assistants and dietary staff. So do they tend to point out that level of worker where it is $14 or $15 an hour wage rates versus nursing necessarily and I think that is one of the big pressure points right now. Workers who have mobility into other jobs, non-healthcare type jobs.

Daniel Bernstein -- Capital One Securities -- Analyst

OK. And then, going back to the tenant that is not paying rent. Is that tenant within the pool that's under 10 EBITDAR? Is that in addition to the disclosure you have in your supplemental?

Bob Stephenson -- Chief Financial Officer

It would be in addition to what is in the supplemental.

Daniel Bernstein -- Capital One Securities -- Analyst

OK. OK. Just wanted to make sure about that. And one last question for me here.

Just on the acquisition side is there a-I just wanted to understand the comments that there is I guess not a landslide of opportunities? Is it more of a pricing issue where you have-there is this distressed operators that the pricing of the real estate is not really distressed at this point? I just want to understand where the disconnect there is between, the stress we have seen in the industry versus maybe consolidation opportunities that you would think would arise from this kind of distress situation.

Bob Stephenson -- Chief Financial Officer

I think some bargain of ours is still very aggressive in terms of picking up real estate, so they have been willing to pay up for it despite the fact that the operations might be distressed.

Daniel Bernstein -- Capital One Securities -- Analyst

OK. Alright I will hop off. Thanks.

Operator

Our next question comes from Richard Anderson with SMBC Nikko. Please proceed.

Richard Anderson -- SMBC Nikko SecuritiesAnalyst

Thanks. Good morning team. So on the, back to the tenant that gave you notice they did. Is there a-can you quantify a kind of a watch list of percentage of revenue that you are looking at? You said 3% here, but is there a number out there that you are kind of keeping an eye on that you can share?

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

Not specifically now. I mean, since the virus came out, we have been in constant contact with virtually all of our operators. I think that is the best way to keep my eye on is just with communication with our operators, and we have done that and continue to do that. So I think we look at everybody and we have to sort of gauge the level of risk of each and every operator and what their challenges are.

Richard Anderson -- SMBC Nikko SecuritiesAnalyst

I guess, what is the over under on this time next quarter, you will have another-see the high probability or nothing is jumping out at you right now?

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

I think part of the answer to that question is, we have been waiting on the last tranche of federal money. Some of it is going to be timing related to that. Remember, there is $24.5 billion, Megan mentioned in her prepared comments. And we heard, I don't know if this came from Asha, that there's another 20 billion -- I'm sorry, $24.5 billion and another $20 billion has been pushed back into that fund, principally from a hospital.

So there might be $44.5 billion dollars to be distributed, and it is going to be unique space. So that happens in a reasonably timely way. I think the handicap, any other is impossible. And another good example would be Florida, there has been a big push in the lobby side we get some money released in the state of Florida.

And if that happens, it dials down the risk that we see a lot. The last comment I would make, and again, I'm just trying to get as much color as I can. We haven't had the type of conversations with any operator that we have with the one that we talked to at June, as of now. So that is the early indicator on from a watch list perspective, for us that hasn't happened.

If there is no money forthcoming for the government, or it is not timely, sooner or later, the occupancy rebound is going-isn't going to be quick enough to prevent some other liquidity issues or what has happened- tackle them when they arise.

Richard Anderson -- SMBC Nikko SecuritiesAnalyst

OK. So what maybe a broader question, anything about what you have been through, that is informing you about the future of OHI, I know you have spent some time expanding into senior housing, with help peaks deal. But do you do you see yourself as a more diversified story in the years to come and not hang your hat as much as you are in skilled nursing or do sort of continue the course and muscle through whatever has to come?

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

Well, the franchise of operators that are our partners are fantastic and we will continue to deploy capital there. But the trend you have seen in terms of senior housing and other assets, now about a fifth of the portfolio, I think that continues. And part of that is just supporting the operators in those property types, whether it is Maplewood or our UK operators or otherwise, I think you will see that percentage climb overtime, just as it has over the last five-years.

Richard Anderson -- SMBC Nikko SecuritiesAnalyst

Yes, OK. And then lastly, for me, I think Steve said Maplewood, specifically occupancy, dropped to 80 year ago in May and is now at 87. Did I get that right?

Steven Insoft -- Chief Corporate Development Officer

Yes, correct.

Richard Anderson -- SMBC Nikko SecuritiesAnalyst

That is really good. Right. I mean, is there anything about that 87% number you are seeing today that is apples to oranges to what other people reporting or is there something special going on that you are kind of already back into the high 80s occupancy wise?

Steven Insoft -- Chief Corporate Development Officer

Sure. The one thing that we know to be the case although it may not account for all of the difference between Maplewood and other operators. As Maplewood made a concerted effort never to let off the marketing investment during the COVID pandemic and still isn't. And I think in certain local markets, they were rewarded for that.

Richard Anderson -- SMBC Nikko SecuritiesAnalyst

OK. Great. Well, thanks very much. I appreciate it.

Operator

[Operator instructions] The next question comes from the Lukas Hartwich with Green Street Advisors. Please proceed.

Lukas Hartwich -- Green Street Advisors -- Analyst

Good morning. I suppose inflation fear are receding, but on lease escalators I think most of those are fixed, but are there any inflation protections built in or are they purely fixed for the length that leased?

Bob Stephenson -- Chief Financial Officer

Hey Lukas. About 97%, 98% of our leases are fixed escalators.

Lukas Hartwich -- Green Street Advisors -- Analyst

OK. And then can you provide some color on the $3.5 million credit loss provision during the quarter?

Bob Stephenson -- Chief Financial Officer

Yes. So as you know there are a lot of components that go into the fee or credit loss component. So we have to go look at each one of our loans and you are required regardless that you have to have some reserves on those loans. So just kind of the normal-when I look at kind of normal occurrence, we are going to have something every quarter from a loss standpoint.

Lukas Hartwich -- Green Street Advisors -- Analyst

Got it. All my other questions are answered. Thank you.

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

At this time, we are showing no further questioners in the queue. And this concludes our question-and-answer session. I would now like to turn the conference back over to Taylor Pickett for any closing remarks.

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

Thank you all for joining us this morning. As always we will be available for any thoughts you may have. Good day.

Operator

[Operator signoff]

Duration: 49 minutes

Call participants:

Michele Reber -- Senior Director of Asset Management

Taylor Pickett -- Chief Executive Officer

Bob Stephenson -- Chief Financial Officer

Dan Booth -- Chief Operating OFficer

Megan Krull -- Senior Vice President, Operations

Steven Insoft -- Chief Corporate Development Officer

Jonathan Hughes -- Raymond James -- Analyst

Matthew Gourmand -- Senior Vice President,Corporate Strategy & Investor Relations

Connor Siversky -- Berenberg Capital Markets -- Analyst

Joshua Dennerlein -- Berenberg Capital Markets -- Analyst

Nick Joseph -- Citi -- Analyst

Daniel Bernstein -- Capital One Securities -- Analyst

Richard Anderson -- SMBC Nikko SecuritiesAnalyst

Lukas Hartwich -- Green Street Advisors -- Analyst

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