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Beyond Meat, Inc. (BYND) Q2 2021 Earnings Call Transcript

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BYND earnings call for the period ending June 30, 2021.

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Beyond Meat, Inc. (BYND -0.14%)
Q2 2021 Earnings Call
Aug 05, 2021, 5:00 p.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:


Operator

Welcome to the Beyond Meat, Inc. 2021 second-quarter conference call. [Operator instructions] As a reminder, this conference is being recorded. I would now like to turn the call over to Lubi Kutua, VP FP&A and investor relations.

Please go ahead.

Lubi Kutua -- Vice President, FP&A and Investor Relations

Thank you. Good afternoon, and welcome. Joining me on today's call are Ethan Brown, founder, president, and chief executive officer; and Philip Hardin, chief financial officer and treasurer. By now, everyone should have access to the company's second quarter earnings press release and investor presentation filed today after market close.

These documents are available on the investor relations section of Beyond Meat's website at www.beyondmeat.com. Before we begin, please note that all the information presented on today's call is unaudited. And during the course of this call, management may make forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. These statements are based on management's current expectations and beliefs and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in these forward-looking statements.

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Forward-looking statements in the earnings release that we issued today, along with the comments on this call, are made only as of today and will not be updated as actual events unfold. Please refer to today's press release, the company's annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020, the company's quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended July 3, 2021, and to be filed with the SEC and other filings with the SEC for a detailed discussion of the risks that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in any forward-looking statements made today. Please also note that on today's call, management will refer to adjusted EBITDA, adjusted gross profit and adjusted net loss, which are non-GAAP financial measures. While we believe these non-GAAP financial measures provide useful information for investors, the presentation of this information is not intended to be considered in isolation or as a substitute for the financial information presented in accordance with GAAP.

Please refer to today's press release or the investor presentation for a reconciliation of adjusted EBITDA, adjusted gross profit and adjusted net loss to their most comparable GAAP measures. And with that, I would now like to turn the call over to Ethan Brown.

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Lubi, and good afternoon, everyone. Before diving into our second quarter business highlights, let me begin by welcoming our new chief financial officer, Phil Hardin, to his first Beyond Meat earnings call. Phil officially joined Beyond Meat a little over three weeks ago and is already proving himself to be a value addition to our team. Phil brings with him a wealth of finance leadership experience from one of the world's largest e-commerce and technology companies, which not so long ago set out on an ambitious journey to transform the way consumers shop.

In many ways, our objectives are just as ambitious as is the requirement that we maintain a long-term focus while making investments today for tomorrow's growth, and we are fortunate to leverage Phil's deep experience as we embark on this next leg of the on-net story. I'm personally very pleased to have Phil with us and hope you will join me in welcoming him. For Q2 2021 results, we generated record net revenues of $149 million which came in toward the top of our guidance range for the quarter and represented a 32% increase year-over-year. I am proud of this result as we cycled our previous best ever quarter in terms of sales, one where the defining feature was COVID-induced stockpiling as stay-at-home orders proliferated across the U.S.

and globe. In Foodservice, net revenues were up 218% year-over-year and 61% sequentially, driven by reopenings within the sector. Here in the U.S., Foodservice net revenues were up 269% year over year, while internationally, we saw an increase of 172%. We continue to hold the No.

1 brand position in terms of dollar share according to NPD data for Q2 2021. Sales of Beyond Meat products were up 95% year over year in the quarter in NPD tracked channels, in line with the overall category during the same period. This year-over-year increase reflects solid gains and signs of recovery among independent Operators, including restaurants, borrowers and pubs, lodging venues and small regional QSR chains, among other segments. We continue to expect year-over-year growth within our foodservice business in the near term, albeit at a more moderate rate as we lap tougher year ago comps and expect pipeline restocking to subside.

In addition, general near-term concerns around rising COVID-19 infection rates could also have a dampening effect on Foodservice service demand. We did see a significant reduction in distribution at Dunkin' Brands as they rationalize their menu. We remain age with Dunkin' around future innovation and collaborations and are in distribution throughout their Western U.S. stores.

I should note that our breakfast acetate continues to do extremely well in other U.S. venues such as pets and Phil's Coffee, among others. In International Foodservice, the 172% increase in net revenue was driven mainly by broad reopening of economic activity in several markets, and we expect solid year-over-year growth in this portion of our business in the near term, barring a significant recurrence of COVID-19-related dynamics. Finally, broadly, as it relates to Foodservice, we are looking forward with excitement to activity with our large strategic QSRs.

As before, I should note that we supply at the request of these partners, and the timing of planned tests and launches could shift based on various considerations, including a resurgence of COVID-19 or other events. Shifting to retail. We saw a year-over-year increase in net revenues of 6%. This moderate increase includes a decline in U.S.

retail revenues of 14%, as we cycled Q2 2020's record retail revenues, which, as you will recall, were fueled by consumer stockpiling at the onset of the pandemic. This comparison notwithstanding, our key brand metrics at household penetration, buyer rates, purchase frequency and repeat rates remain robust. We saw continued advancement in our household penetration, which increased 80 basis points sequentially and 120 basis points on a year-over-year basis to 6.2%, according to SPINS IRI consumer panel data for the 52-week period ended June 27, 2021. And on a year-over-year basis, our buyer rate increased 12%, purchase frequency was up 9%, and our repeat rate increased 5% versus a year ago to 51%.

In addition to these strong brand metrics, Beyond Meat's unaided brand awareness in the U.S. increased to its highest level of 26% according to July 2021 survey data and remains the highest such level among all major plant-based meat brands by a healthy margin. We continue to hold the No. 1 product position and four of the top six products in our category, according to SPINS data for U.S.

multi-outlet and natural specialty cans for the 12-week period ended June 13, 2021. Total distribution points for the Beyond Meat brand, or TDPs, increased 55% year-over-year driven by growth in total outlets, as well as the introduction of new products, including Beyond Meatballs and Beyond Breakfast Sausage links according to SPINS data for MULO and natural specialty channels for the same period. This solid increase in TDPs, which we believe bodes well for the long-term growth prospects of our brand does, however, exert near-term downward pressure on velocity, measured in dollars per TDP, the tune of 35% year over year. Overall, looking at consumer takeaway across MULO during the same 12-week period and reflecting the cycling of Q2 2020 stockpiling, sales of Beyond Meat products were down 4% year over year, slightly outperforming the category, which was down 4.4% and contributing to a 10 basis point year-over-year increase in market share for the brand.

In international retail, we maintained our strong sales growth momentum, with net revenues up 198% year over year as we continue to drive increased distribution both in terms of footprint and average items per outlet. This growth occurred across a backdrop where similar to the U.S., globally, the industry was down as it cycled Q2 2020 stockpiling. We believe our progress internationally will accelerate and broaden as we implement investments, including the continued scaling of our EU and China operations that will enable capacity expansion, cost optimization and increased consumer engagement. During the quarter, we launched Beyond Meatballs in Europe for the first time, beginning with major retailers in the Netherlands and Switzerland, marking the fourth Beyond Meat retail product offering available in Europe today.

We also launched meatballs in Australia for the first time as well as secured distribution of our burger at Woolworths, one of Australia's largest retailers, further demonstrating our commitment to expanding the availability and breadth of our product offerings across all of our key geographic regions. Overall, our distribution footprint in international retail saw strong growth of approximately 5,000 stores or a 21% increase sequentially, driven mainly by expansion in Canada, Germany, Australia, Austria and the U.K. Let me now provide a brief update on some recent product highlights and key strategic initiatives. As you recall, at the end of the first quarter, we announced the launch of the latest iteration of our Beyond Burger, the 3.0.

Early feedback on the new burger has been very positive with the product even earning People magazines, Best Plant-based Burger Award and being featured as such on Good Morning America just over a month ago. It remains too early to draw any definitive conclusions about the incrementality of Beyond Burger 3.0 versus 2.0. However, we expect that similar to the transition from 1.0 to 2.0. This new and improved burger will welcome more consumers for brand.

As I alluded to in my remarks about the sequential uptick of our household penetration we may already be benefiting from the switch. As you know, we believe that tasting is believing into that end. We recently launched our biggest product sampling campaign ever in partnership with key retail customers. We will also be activating further sampling opportunities via our food trucks in various cities across the U.S.

Just as noteworthy, we recently launched Beyond Chicken Tenders, marketing return under our poultry platform. As with the Beyond Burger 3.0, Beyond Chicken Tenders are gaining strong recognition. For example, the product won the prestigious 2021 Fabby Award by the National Restaurant Association right out of the gate. Apart from the great taste, Beyond Chicken Tenders boast 40% less saturated fat than a leading food service chicken tender, 14 grams of protein per serving, have no cholesterol, and of course, are made with no GMOs, antibiotics or hormones.

Beyond Chicken Tenders are currently available at more than 400 restaurants nationwide, and we intend to expand distribution throughout the balance of the year. Separately under our poultry platform, we announced limited time offerings at two fantastic partners, namely Panda Express here in the U.S. and A&W in Canada. For Panda Express, we co-developed a delicious plant-based take on Panda Signature orange chicken dish dubbed beyond the original orange thicken.

The offering, which became available at 13 locations in Southern California and New York, is a plant-based version of Panda's most popular menu item and has been met with enthusiastic consumer response, making beyond the original orange chicken when a Panda's most successful regional launches to date. In another new product from our poultry platform, at A&W, we launched Beyond Meat Nuggets nationwide across Canada. Beyond Meat and A&W first partnered in 2018 to introduce the Beyond Burger to Canadian consumers and we are thrilled to be bringing more innovation to market while these LTOs and limited distribution rollouts are just the beginning of our screen to poultry, we're truly humbled by the overwhelmingly positive feedback or Beyond Chicken products are generating, and we are expanding our production capabilities under this product platform as quickly as possible. I'd like to now turn to our progress in China in the EU.

First, in China, we continue to ramp up volume at our manufacturing facility in where we commenced commercial production of finished goods in early April. We are currently validating our extrusion asset, which will enable full end-to-end production capabilities in China. We look forward to driving growth in this key market as we scale our Yijing operations so as to enable locally produced Beyond Meat products that are tailored to the Chinese palette are available at a competitive price and are made from locally sourced inputs. Our Q2 commercial highlights from China include the launch of a plant-based spicy beef wrap at KFC China in over 2,600 stores in 28 cities on a limited time basis, as well as the launch of our new e-commerce platform on JD.com, China's largest online and overall retailer.

This new presence on JD.com unlocks distribution in roughly 300 cities throughout China and provides an unrivaled nationwide fulfillment network with same or next-day delivery to a population of over 1 billion people. Our JD.com launch marks the first time our Beyond Pork product is widely accessible to consumers across China, and we anticipate adding more Beyond Meat products to the platform in the future. Turning to Europe. We have completed the construction phase of our new facility in the Netherlands.

We continue to produce a priory drive blends there and in the final stages of validating our highest throughput lines yet. These tests are expected to be completed over the coming weeks, and we will be transferring learnings from these higher volume lines to our production sites in the U.S. and China as part of our global cost down effort. Commercial highlights in the EU include several key retail distribution wins across Germany, the Netherlands and Switzerland, among others.

In addition, in July, following a successful trial last November, Pizza Hut U.K. added Beyond Meat as a permanent menu item at all delivery hub locations across the U.K. Before closing my remarks, I'd like to revisit the three pillars of our long-term growth: taste, health and cost. As I've noted, it is my belief that we'll be a rare consumer who rejects a product that is truly indistinguishable from, healthier than and below the price of its animal protein equivalent.

We are making sizable investments today to realize this outcome. These investments, which are occurring across the U.S., EU and China are vitally important to accessing the full potential of our total addressable market and establishing Beyond Meat as the global protein company of tomorrow. We are investing in all century aspects of our platforms and products, including flavor, aroma, appearance and texture or FAAT, F A T, for short, with the goal of collapsing the differences between our products and their animal protein equivalents. These investments generate near-term wins such as the Beyond Burger 3.0 and our award-winning Beyond Chicken Tenders, among others, while enabling through the application of state-of-the-art equipment and best-in-class scientific and engineering talent, future products in the U.S., EU and China alongside our other markets that bring us closer and closer to that true north of an indistinguishable build.

And to bring these advances to the consumer, we are investing at a healthy pace in the commercialization of products and platforms for our QSR partners and for retail markets. We continue to invest in the nutrition of our products as well as educating the consumer around the health benefits of going beyond. Our work with Stanford School of Medicine, a five-year program designed to generate clinically and statistically significant data relating to the health impacts of different protein choices, including our products, is an important part of this initiative. And finally, as I've referenced earlier in my remarks, we are actively investing in our global cost-down program.

Most notably today, we are putting in place infrastructure and equipment to drive scale and efficiency gains. And in the case of EU and China access local supply chains. Though I am pleased with our Q2 results, particularly the recovery in Foodservice and expansion in international retail as we enjoyed some respite from COVID, it is our progress against these long-term growth pillars of taste, health and cost that continues to hold our focus. With that, I will turn it over to Phil to walk us through our second quarter financial results in a bit more detail.

Philip Hardin -- Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

Thank you, Ethan, for the warm welcome, and good afternoon, everyone. Let me begin by saying that I'm excited to join the Beyond Meat team at this moment in the company's history. Although there is plenty of hard work ahead of us, I believe that Beyond Meat is uniquely positioned to fulfill its long-term mission of changing the way we deliver protein to the set consumers place, benefiting human health, our global climate and animal welfare. As the team responded saying internally, tasting is believing.

And after having the privilege of sampling some of our innovation teams newest prototypes, I'm convinced that we have an opportunity to capture the appetites of mediators around the globe. Capitalizing on this opportunity will require long-term focus and investment in our global innovation and production capabilities, our marketing efforts, IT infrastructure and human capital. I view my role as helping the company to do that in a structured and fiscally responsible way, bringing operational discipline and analytical rigor and ensuring that we simultaneously address the needs of our growing global organization while being disciplined stewards of our shareholders' capital. I'm excited to embark on this journey, and I look forward to getting to know each of you better along the way.

With that, let me now dive into our second quarter financial results. As a reminder, Q2 2021 ended on July 3, which is later than in previous years, such as Q2 2020, which ended on June 27. The later Q2 calendar captured more of the high sales volume days leading up to the July 4 holiday in the U.S. In prior years, these days would have been included in Q3.

We achieved net revenues of $149.4 million in the second quarter of 2021, representing an increase of 31.8% compared to the second quarter of 2020. Growth in net revenues was primarily driven by a 218% year-over-year increase in sales to Foodservice customers, reflecting further recovery from COVID-19, which significantly depressed demand levels in the Foodservice channel a year ago. Total retail net revenues increased 6% in the second quarter of 2021 compared to the year ago period, primarily due to increased sales among international customers, partially offset by lower U.S. retail channel sales compared to the year ago period.

In the U.S., our continued growth in total distribution and later calendar was not enough to offset the steep year-over-year comp resulting from consumer stockpiling behavior in Q2 2020. Across all channels, net revenue per pound was $5.69 in the second quarter of 2021, which was flat on a year-over-year basis. Taking a closer look at our distribution channels. In retail, across the U.S.

and international, our volume of products sold increased 9% year-over-year, driven by international. Net revenue per pound for total retail was lower by approximately 3% year over year, primarily reflecting increased trade discounts in the U.S., partially offset by product mix shift. In Foodservice, total volume of products sold increased 172% year over year, while net revenue per pound was up approximately 17% year over year. The strong growth in volume primarily reflects broad reopening of economic activity, both in the U.S.

and in certain international markets and a loosening of operating capacity restrictions across Foodservice channels. As we look to Q3 2021, we expect our rate of volume growth in Foodservice channels to moderate in Q3 relative to Q2. This expectation is driven by a tougher year-over-year comp, what we suspect was a tailwind in Q2 attributable to pipeline refill and some recent loss of distribution in our Foodservice business. In addition, we believe it's prudent to call out that due to recent increases in COVID-19 infection rates stemming from the Delta variant, we're seeing some early signs of a return to a more cautionary stance across certain parts of the Foodservice sector.

Moving down the P&L to gross profit. Gross profit during Q2 2021 was $47.4 million or 31.7% of net revenues as compared to $33.7 million or 29.7% of net revenues in Q2 of 2020. In Q2 2020, adjusted gross profit which excludes $5.9 million of costs associated with product repacking activities driven by the onset of COVID-19 was $39.6 million or 34.9% of net revenues. We incurred no such costs in Q2 2021.

So our gross margin and adjusted gross margin for Q2 2021 are the same at 31.7%. The year-over-year decrease in adjusted gross margin was primarily driven by higher fixed overhead cost per unit, higher transportation costs and higher depreciation and amortization expense, which reduced gross margin by approximately 120 basis points, 160 basis points and 100 basis points, respectively. With regard to fixed overhead and depreciation expenses, these increases are not unexpected and are being driven by our capacity expansion initiatives ahead of our anticipated future growth. Although such initiatives do put pressure on our margins in the near term, we maintain that in light of what we view as our long-term opportunity and considering the caliber and scale of retail and Foodservice partners we seek to grow with, these strategic decisions are required.

Turning to opex. Total operating were approximately $66 million or 44.2% of net revenues in the second quarter of 2021 as compared to $41.8 million or 36.9% of net revenues in the year ago period. The year-over-year increase in operating expenses primarily reflects growth in overall headcount levels to support our innovation, operations and marketing capabilities, as well as our international expansion, increased marketing expenses higher production trial activities and increased outbound freight costs, which are included in selling expenses. Net loss in the second quarter of 2021 was $19.7 million or $0.31 per common share as compared to net loss of $10.2 million or $0.16 per common share.

Adjusted EBITDA was a loss of $2.2 million or negative 1.5% of net revenues in the second quarter of 2021 compared to adjusted EBITDA of $11.7 million or 10.3% of net revenue in Q2 2020. Turning to our balance sheet and cash flow highlights. Our cash and cash equivalents balance was approximately $1 billion and total debt outstanding was approximately $1.1 billion as of July 3, 2021. For the 6 months ended July 3, 2021, net cash used in operating activities was $120.4 million compared to $44.3 million in the year ago period.

Capital expenditures totaled $51.4 million for the six months ended July 3, 2021, compared to $26.0 million for the year ago period. The increase in capital expenditures was primarily driven by continued investments in production equipment and facilities related to capacity expansion initiatives in the U.S., China and the EU. Finally, let me provide some commentary our near-term outlook. As I alluded to earlier, there continues to be uncertainty, particularly in Foodservice channels related to the COVID-19 infection rates in the Delta variant, as well as reimplementation of safety measures in certain jurisdictions and potential impact on customer demand levels.

Although we generally expect to see continued year-over-year growth in our Foodservice business for the balance of the year, albeit at a more moderate pace than what we saw in Q2, the reasons I outlined earlier. This outlook assumes reasonable containment of COVID-19 infection rate, both in the U.S. and in certain international regions. In keeping with the more limited guidance we reinstituted last quarter for the third quarter of 2021, we expect net revenues to be in the range of $120 million to $140 million, representing a year-over-year increase of 27% to 48% compared to the third quarter of 2020.

Embedded in this guidance are a number of factors that are affecting our typical seasonality between our second and third quarters. These include: first, an anticipated sequential moderation in Foodservice shipments following some pipeline restocking activity, particularly in June. Second, relative to a year ago, we had five fewer shipping days in Q3 ahead of the July 4 holiday, which is obviously one of our key promotional periods during the summer grilling season. Third, we've had some loss of distribution in our Foodservice channels in both our U.S.

and international businesses, and some food service venues are finding it difficult to operate at full capacity also due to near-term labor challenges. And lastly, fourth, we believe some added caution is warranted given the recent uptick in COVID-19 infection rates due to the delta variant and increased uncertainty associated with that. Although not yet at a level that has caused a major concern, we have seen a few early signs of customers reinstituting more restrictive measures and signaling a more cautionary disposition. In terms of profitability, as Ethan stated, we are continuing to invest in support of our long-term growth strategy which includes investing in capacity, including internationally, investing in additional talent and organizational capabilities, investing in marketing spend, and we're maintaining a robust schedule of production trial activities in preparation for new product innovations we hope to commercialize in the near future.

With that, I'll turn the call back over to the Operator to open it up for your questions. Thank you.

Questions & Answers:


Operator

[Operator instructions] And our first question is from the line of Robert Moskow with Credit Suisse. Please go ahead.

Rob Moskow -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Hi. Thanks for the question. I wanted to know if you could give a little more clarity on what you mean by some customers signaling more cautionary dispositions and cautionary measures? Does that also mean that they might be delaying test programs in the QSR channel and pushing those out a little bit later?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Thank you, Rob, for the question and good to connect. So I think what we're seeing on the Foodservice side are two things going on: One is there is a labor shortage that has impacted at least one of our launches and has postponed it until the first part of next year. And then second, we are seeing just general conservatism.

If you think about some of the particularly independent Operators and folks like that, that came out of what we thought was the sort of final phase of COVID, they stock up on product, and then there's this delta variant that comes in, which requires them to be a little bit less confident about their outlook. So they're being more conservative in orders is what we're seeing. And so those two effects, the impact of labor and then the continued bit of cloudiness about the Delta variant. I think is creating a little bit of a drag on Foodservice at the moment.

And so for us, I think the main characteristic of the third quarter and our guidance is simply lack of visibility. And so that's how we wanted to be offering this new range.

Rob Moskow -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Yes. OK. That makes sense. And the second part of my question, international retail, like, I really don't know how to forecast it.

It's actually a lot higher than I thought it would be. Is this a new run rate at $28 million per quarter? Because look, it's a lot higher than it was last year. It's a lot higher than it was first quarter. And so how would you describe the real run rate for that segment?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. I mean I personally am really excited about international retail. I mean, the growth we saw was strong. I think we were up 198% year over year, added about 5,000 stores in Germany, Switzerland, etc.

I think there's a similar sense of lack of visibility in international retail, as I just spoke about in the sense that we're seeing things like demos and promotions, particularly in Europe, pushed out or canceled because of the uncertainty around the Delta variant. And hopefully, that's a very temporary thing, and that's obviously optimistic view on it and the one that we hold, but wanted to be, again, a little bit conservative because of that. So I wouldn't suggest that's going to be the case in Q3 in terms of a run rate. But I do think overall, it's the long term, very, very promising for us.

Rob Moskow -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

OK. So you think it's possible that some of these retailers might have pulled forward inventory or conducting a lot of activity in 2Q and maybe we're going to be a little more cautious until Delta passes, is that fair?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

I think that caution is probably right, yes. Yes. I'm not sure about the earlier behavior, but certainly the caution, yes.

OK. All right I'll pass along. Thank you.

Operator

And our next question is from the line of Alexia Howard with Bernstein. Please proceed with your question.

Alexia Howard -- Sanford C. Bernstein -- Analyst

Good evening everyone. So can I ask about the market share trends because they've obviously deteriorated somewhat, as we've all noticed in the Nielsen data. But I guess my first question is, what proportion of your U.S. retail business is actually captured by what we see in Nielsen or IRI versus what you're seeing in SPINS and other non-measured channels like Costco? So just want to get a sense for how much are we missing that you guys are getting? And then secondly, obviously, with the share trends deteriorating, we know we're lapping a big ramp-up in distribution from a key competitor that happened last summer.

Do you anticipate those share trends might start to stabilize at any point? And what would drive that?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. So good question. I'll answer the first part of that and then turn it over to Lubi on the second to Phil. So we had this kind of peak of activity in retail in the second quarter of 2020 as consumers were stockpiling.

And then if you take a step back from that, and begin to look at our share trends from, let's say, November to now. we have had a very steady upward trajectory on that. So I think we're a 21.1% or something like that percent now. And so eight consecutive four-week periods of increase.

So I feel pretty good about where we're headed on market share. And we obviously do a lot of analysis around the impact of competition on the brand. And we're actually doing quite well in that regard. We're finding that our brand has maintained the vast majority of our buyers.

And these buyers, as I've noted in the comments earlier in terms of household penetration -- frequency rates, etc. They are buying more on a per household basis. And so overall, those trends are strong. And then if you look at -- we obviously give some share up to competitors, but we're gaining more from the balance of competitors.

And so on a net basis. That's why you see that increase occurring. So overall, it's hard to compare against that Q2 2020 comp. But if you look at the trends, once that normalizes, we continue to gain market share.

Lubi Kutua -- Vice President, FP&A and Investor Relations

Alexia, this is Lubi. So on the second part of your question in terms of how much is the SCANA data representative of our U.S. retail sales? We subscribe to the SPINS' IRI data. And I know on the street, you guys are probably looking at either IRI or Nielsen.

What I can say is for the data set that we subscribe to, it's probably representative of around 70% or so of our U.S. retail business. The large pieces that are not captured in there that make up that 30% would obviously be certain club stores and then to a lesser extent, there are some things like certain natural/specialty stores and a much lesser extent, things like our DTC, right, that direct-to-consumer, which rolls up into retail as well. But I would say roughly 70% or so is representative of our U.S.

retail sales.

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Alexia, if one of the things that I found actually encouraging our market share activity is the sheer amount of money that is being spent marketing around this category and by competitors. And yet, we still have this eight week -- our eighth consecutive four-week periods where our market share is increasing. And we still hold in our position, and we still hold four of the top six products in retail.

So overall, I think in a competitive environment where there's a lot of marketing going on, we're benefiting from the impact of that marketing in the sense it's bringing more consumers to the market. As long as our repeat rates keep going up, you're obviously going to benefit from that as more consumers come in and try it and then stick with our brands. So it's a competitive space but one where we're doing pretty well.

Alexia Howard -- Sanford C. Bernstein -- Analyst

Thank you very much.

Operator

And our next question is from the line of Adam Samuelson with Goldman Sachs. Please go ahead.

Adam Samuelson -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Yes. Thanks. Good evening everyone. So I guess my first question is thinking about the production side and the cost environment and appreciating if there's a lot of moving parts in terms of your unit costs at the moment.

But hoping you can maybe just help us think about the inflationary environment you might be seeing in terms of freight logistics, packaging, raw materials, fixed cost leverage? And how those are playing out? And on the fixed cost point, just -- how do we think about layering in some of the new production capacity in China and Europe, both in the second quarter and into the back half of the year?

Phil Hardin -- Chief Financial Officer

Hi. This is Phil. I'll take that one. So as we said in our remarks, the primary drivers of our gross margin deterioration to adjusted gross margin deterioration, we're really around fixed overhead, transportation and depreciation and amortization.

And so as we said in the remarks, really the fixed capacity piece, we're expecting, we're well aware of. And we are seeing some increases as you pointed out, transportation, transportation driven by kind of two factors: the first is what is the raw cost of the truck, and the second is how we run your network, and so both of those contributed. On the ingredient side, the materials didn't actually provide a major impact to our gross margin. We are seeing some increases of price.

There are other factors that drive the total cost in the gross margin calculation. And so this quarter were offsetting. So that's where we are on those. In terms of the fixed cost leverage, obviously, we're investing to generate more capacity.

We are in the process of bringing on capacity in both China and Europe. And so we will start. We're already incurring some costs there, and we'll start impairing some more as more equipment comes online. But it also gives us the ability to manufacture close to our customers to create products in the local countries, which we're very excited about.

And so we're eager to make those investments and grow those new markets in international.

Adam Samuelson -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

And if I could just follow up on that and it ties into kind of Rob's question earlier. I mean does that have in the local production capacity, do you think that unlock some more significant both retail and Foodservice opportunities in those regions? And any framing on how quickly that is? And I'm just trying to get a sense of having what that does to your sales potential over the course of the next six to 12 months? Or is it going to be a bit -- not as significant of a ramp?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

I think it's incredibly important in the international market for us to get this and then production fully up and scaled. And so we made the announcement about being under operation at our Yijing facility and now taking that to another level where we're going to actually be doing the full process there instead of just finished goods. And the entire reason that we're investing so much right now in both the EU and in China is to get to that local production to access local supply chains as well to begin to tailor our products to the local pallets. So we've almost been able to be successful in international markets, without having the right pricing in place and with having products that, while good, we're not tailored to those particular markets.

So I view the work we're doing today in aging in Shanghai and in the Netherlands, as step function change that will allow us to offer products at a much more competitive price that are tailored to the local consumer using local supply chains. And it's not just the access to local supply chain. We've also taken the opportunity as we're building a new production to build much higher efficiency lines. So you'll have those two benefits coming together in those locations that will allow us to offer a lower cost structure and then lower pricing to the consumer is absolutely essential.

If you look at where we are, for example, on menu in China, it's way too expensive. And it's the strength of our brand and the quality of our products that allow us to play at that level. But as I've always said, our goal is to be able to ultimately underprice animal protein, getting access to local protein supply chain in China, as an example, is a really important piece as well as in the EU. So overall, yes, it's going to be a pretty big benefit to us in terms of when we'll start to see that come on.

I can probably give you more color on our next call on that because it's very much in motion right now.

Adam Samuelson -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

OK. That's really helpful. Thank you.

Operator

And our next question comes from the line of Bryan Spillane with Bank of America. Please go ahead with your question.

Bryan Spillane -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Hey good afternoon everyone. I have two questions. One is just a follow-up, Ethan, to Alexia's question or your comment or response to Alexia's question. You mentioned that with competitors spending money in marketing, I guess, in the U.S.

is actually helping stimulate the category. So I guess it kind of raises the question. Does it make you think more about maybe spending more in marketing and advertising? As a category leader, it's kind of like when Coke spends, they drive the soft drink category, if you were to spend more, would it actually drive the category? And then I have a follow-up.

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Did our marketing team get a hold of you? [indiscernible] Yes. And you know my wholesome with that with marketing. I mean I think it's incredibly important. We love to -- I mean, our story is so strong in the sense that when people start using our product, they do see the impact.

They see it in their health and they see it in the kind of impact they can have on the issues they care about and then, of course, the taste. And so it's easy to market this product. And we need to then think about how do we amplify those messages. And so all the work we're doing with ambassadors and athletes and things like that is really important.

But when is the right time to really start doing it in a national stage, doing the national ads on TV and other pieces. And we haven't yet taken that step. You've seen billboards out there. You're seeing a ton of social media.

You see some limited TV buys, but there is another step-up that we can take, and we're very close to that. It has to do with gaining distribution in some of our larger quick-serve restaurant partners and things of that as well as just getting COVID completely behind us. But yes, you will see us spend more marketing, and we've got a great story to tell us we're going to get out there and do it.

Bryan Spillane -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

OK. Great. That makes sense. And then just as a follow-up, we've had this question a few times over the course of the year.

And it relates to just getting the price or the cost of the product down to parity with animal protein. And so I guess a couple of questions around that. One is just is that both true for retail and Foodservice? So like your landed cost in the Foodservice operators as well as what the consumer sees on the self in retail? And then I guess the second part of that is just assuming that, that's still the ambition, does the cost-down program when it's completed sort of get you to the point where you can be at price parity and still achieve kind of the mid-30s gross margin objectives that you've had over or aspiration that you've had over a long period of time?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, great question. So I think on the first one, what we publicly committed to is to within now three years or a little less, to be able to underprice our protein in at least one category. And I think we're on our way to that for sure. And that will materialize in both the retail and Foodservice space.

And maybe some fun things actually later this year, potentially in retail, just kind of doing some messaging and some marketing around that. But it's going to be different for each platform. So poultry is harder as a much harder target. But beef is probably the one you'll see us do it in first.

And on the margin itself, I'll probably let Lubi and Phil answer that. But I think in general, it's a little bit too early to tell just because there are so many factors. But this program is well underway now, and it's actually exciting. We've got a ton of folks in here working on it.

It has to do with these large efficiency lines and gains in throughput as well as negotiating through our supply chain as well as some reformulation, some local supply, etc.. So it's a big effort here. It's one I think that is necessary to unlock the TAM here and give us the type of growth in the out years that we expect. And again, it gets back to these three flywheels or levers of the taste, so it's indistinguishable, get the Century experience in entirety, whether it's the appearance, the aroma, the texture get that all right.

Second, make sure the consumer understands is healthier for them. So that's all the work we're doing in Stamford, better than third, as I've talked about, get this cost down. I think it becomes a rare consumer that rejected after you to accomplish those three goals.

Bryan Spillane -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

All right. Thank you.

Operator

And our next question comes from the line of Ken Goldman from J.P. Morgan. Please go ahead.

Ken Goldman -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

Hi. Thanks. I just wanted a quick clarification. If 3Q '21 has five fewer shipping days leading up to July 4 than it did a year ago, I haven't checked the dates on this yet, but is the implication that 2Q '21 had five more shipping days leading up to July 4? And if that's the case, how much did that help retail sales in the quarter? Or maybe I'm misunderstanding that whole thing?

Phil Hardin -- Chief Financial Officer

Yes. This is Phil. I'll take that one. So first of all, it's more about the timing of when the quarter fell.

So it's not a different number of days overall. But obviously, the lead up to the fourth is a pretty heavy grilling and heavy promotional period. And so it's just heavier volume that fell into Q2 this year versus prior years. So it's not an actual number of days in Q2.

It would be different to the number of days in Q4... In terms of the size, a very rough way to look at it... Sorry? OK. A very rough way to look at it is just if we look at Q2 this year, if the calendar had been kind of the same as last year.

A very rough number would be about $6 million in the Q2 period as a result of that shift in the time. So you're sort of trading off early spring days for kind of mid-summer days.

Ken Goldman -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

That's very clear. And then my follow-up is you mentioned Foodservice distribution losses outside the U.S. I didn't get the sense they were that big. But can you just fill us in a little bit on what those were? And maybe give us a sense of their size and their impact?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Ken, hope you're doing well. So I think if you think about the overall distribution for the company, we gained distribution over the quarter, went from about, what, $118,000 to $119,000. In the international space, those losses were primarily due to independent operators who didn't make it through COVID sort of washed out during the process versus being dropped from menu or things of that nature.

So it was not a big number, and that was from what we understand the cost.

Ken Goldman -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

All right. Thank you.

Operator

And our next question comes from the line of Rob Dickerson with Jefferies. Please go ahead.

Rob Dickerson -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Great. Thanks so much. Just had one question on some of the QSR partnerships. I'm sorry, I got a call at hopeless already.

I think you said some point previously, you think that maybe some of those new partnerships that you've recently signed a could start to see some product come through, maybe, maybe toward the end of this year, but probably more of a '22 and go-forward event. So just curious, kind of broadly speaking, if there's any update on timing of those products? And I'm assuming if we just take Donald's for an example, the kind of the rollout of the plant and kind of how you're thinking about that in terms of kind of rate this year in the next?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Sure. No, thanks for the question. So not to be unfair to McDonald's and I want to step back from them specifically. And if you look at the universe of QSRs that we're working with that are large and global in nature.

I do think, and of course, these plans do change because of the -- we talked for a number different reasons, COVID labor, etc. I think you will see some activity this year that is test in nature and things like that or market analysis and tests and things like that. And then you're right, the general uptick will be in 2022 from what we're seeing. But provided plans don't change.

There's something exciting that's coming actually in the very near term to new automation from us at rolling out with one of our big partners. So I'm excited about what I'm seeing in terms of the swing in the QSR space, but I don't think it's going to contribute from those large partners to significant volume in the second half of the year.

Rob Dickerson -- Jefferies -- Analyst

OK. Fair enough. And then maybe if I could just squeeze one quick one in. In terms of the new shipping product, there kind of timing expectations on broader U.S.

rollout that we retail. Again, is that something we should be expecting to see some time later this year? Or is that more of a venture sets, etc.?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. I think that's been a really good launch for us, the poultry platform in general. And so we launched with the chicken tenders in -- broadly in Foodservice. And then did the Panda Express, which was a great project sold out right away almost, I think, within a week or so for the four-week plan.

And then with A&W the nuggets we just launched there nationwide in Canada. And so that's just the beginning on that platform. You are going to see more activity from our poultry platform in terms of number of customers and activity in the balance of the year. I don't know if we're going to sign a revenue target or number to that publicly, but it is something that we're scaling up now.

Rob Dickerson -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Thank you so much.

Operator

And our next question comes from the line of Rupesh Parikh with Oppenheimer. Please go ahead.

Rupesh Parikh -- Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. -- Analyst

Good afternoon. Thanks for taking my question. So I wanted to go back to just the loss of, I guess, some of your Dunkin' distribution. I was wondering if you could provide some more color in terms of what drove that loss of distribution? And then if you have any learnings going forward, I guess, on the QSR side?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Sure. So the Dunkin' relationship, I think, first of all, it's important to note that it's still strong with respect to the Western states and we're in all of their Western stores and really enjoying the relationship. There was a change in management there, and they have every right and appropriately decided to do a review of the menu and make changes, and we were part of that. If you look back at our history of QSR launches, we are from time to time, we're going to cycle off menus.

And so if you look, for example, a couple of years ago, Tim Hortons did the same thing. And back then, I don't think there's portended any issues with our traction in Foodservice, and I really expect the same in this case. I think that you'll see us continue to add QSR distribution of the largest QSRs at a very healthy pace, provided we don't see a sustained resurgence in COVID. Again, it gets back to this most recent few weeks, as I've mentioned A&W's Panda Express, etc.

But Pizza Hut, for example, in the U.K., just added us as a permanent menu item, tian sauce beef and pork crumble, the announcement I referenced coming soon. So a lot of things going on, and you look at that very product itself and how it's doing it heats and Caribou and bills. I anticipated this question obviously. And viewing the data from those stores, I came across a quote they shared with us from one of these outlets, and Caribou and fills.

talking about basically the three times lift in sales from the original forecast when they launched it back in March, which is held on steady since the launch and that the product at this particular store is the No. 2 item behind the bacon cheddar product, bringing in more dense consumers and driving new customers of the business. That's exactly what we want to hear from our QSR partners, and it's that very product, that breakfast sauces product that's doing it. So I think you'll see us continue to do things for Dunkin'.

That's my expectation and just part of the kind of cycling on and off that occurs in the sector.

Rupesh Parikh -- Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. -- Analyst

Great. And then maybe just one follow-up question. Just given some of the COVID uncertainty out there. As you look at your R&D spending and really SG&A in the back half of the year, should we expect that you guys will still remain aggressive? Or is there a potential for me to cut back in terms of aggressive you are on the spending side?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

I'm sorry, I didn't hear the first part of the question.

Rupesh Parikh -- Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. -- Analyst

Yes. So just with COVID on sorting out there. I was just curious like how aggressive do you guys plan to still be on the R&D and the SG&A side in the back half of the year?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. No. So I think it gets back to, do we believe that anything has fundamentally changed in terms of the long-term trajectory of the business or total addressable market, etc.. And in fact, the case keeps getting stronger for investment with the brand and what we're doing.

And so if you look at the opex increase we've had recently, a lot of that opex is going into the areas you'd want, which are people costs in terms of adding new talent, a lot of that in innovation, a lot of it in commercialization of products. And so we're going to keep doing that because, again, as we view throughout the pandemic, these issues, are somewhat transitory and we don't think have an impact on long-term health of the business. So I think we'll continue to make those investments.

Rupesh Parikh -- Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. -- Analyst

OK. Great. Thank you.

Operator

And our next question comes from the line of Benjamin Theurer with Barclays. Please go ahead.

Ben Theurer -- Barclays Investment Bank -- Analyst

Just two quick ones. So first of all, you've clearly accelerated a lot capital expenditure, and you've talked a lot about the investments you're doing over in Europe, over in Asia. We're basically at a run rate ruble roughly double where we were last year. If we think about the back half and into 2022 and with the ambition you have to further deliver product locally produced.

How should we think about your capex program in the next couple of quarters? Just to understand a little bit as well how cash flow is going to look like considering the heavy investments you're currently undergoing? Thank you.

Lubi Kutua -- Vice President, FP&A and Investor Relations

Hey. Sure, Ben, this is Lubi, I'll take that question. So yes, so you mentioned it, right, that if you look at the rate of spend that we've had so far through the year. In the first half, we're running at roughly double, I say, I would say that you should expect a similar type of growth in capex in the back half of this year.

And in terms of what capex looks like next year, we're not providing any sort of guidance around that. But I think what we've said generally that, look, over the next couple of years, this is going to be a pretty capital-intensive business because we are -- we see this opportunity ahead of us, and we are investing to try to capture our fair share of that, right? And so when you think about some of the things that we have going on, right? So there's obviously sort of capacity expansion is always sort of a constant that we're spending against, right? We have this new headquarters in L.A., that's going to house our new state-of-the-art innovation center that's coming up. We're currently looking. I think we mentioned this previously at having a fully dedicated pilot production facility somewhere close in this area.

So we'll be spending toward that. And then this cost-down program that we've mentioned, right, we are really taking a very wide lens and looking at all potential options, right? And so some of those initiatives that we are looking at from a cost down perspective, may require some additional capital spending. So we'll give you guys an update on where we expect to be for 2022 when we are guiding for 2022. But we've said generally, look, the next couple of years are going to be pretty capital intensive.

But clearly, we wouldn't be doing this if we didn't think that this is required to capture a significant chunk of the opportunity that we see ahead of us.

Ben Theurer -- Barclays Investment Bank -- Analyst

OK. And then my second question is about your distribution channels and the brand awareness slide you're showing. So it really looks like that with the exception of international retail, there was a sequential deceleration that we saw fewer outlets in international Foodservice, as well as in the U.S. Foodservice, but we also saw a fewer outlets in U.S.

retail. Could you elaborate a little bit about what's going on in those segments? I understood the retail piece. You said you talked about Germany, Australia, Austria, U.K. So that's clear where the uptick is coming from.

But what's been happening in U.S. retail and in Foodservice, both international, as well as domestic?

Lubi Kutua -- Vice President, FP&A and Investor Relations

Ben, I'll take that one as well. So if you look at the retail total growth in doors, right? I think what we've said in terms of a growth rate from the total number of doors that we're in the U.S. you should expect to see that decelerate because we are so well distributed in the U.S. today, right? So we are pretty much in all of the major retailers here in the U.S.

So the real opportunity from a distribution perspective in the U.S. centers more around the -- continuing to increase our product offerings per store as opposed to continuing to grow that number of doors, right? On the U.S. Foodservice piece, right, so we talked about Dunkin', for instance, right? That was obviously part of the driver there. The international retail, we're seeing continued growth in some of the markets that Ethan mentioned in his prepared remarks, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Australia, for example.

So I think you'll continue to see pretty robust growth there. And then what we saw in International Foodservice, right, I think we lost 1,000 total doors roughly in this quarter on a sequential basis, right? I think part of that is just reflective of the lingering impact of COVID-19, right, where we had primarily some of these small independent Operators, a lot of them were in Canada where we lost some of that distribution. But we think, look, the long-term part of the distribution rollout in international Foodservice is still looks very attractive. So we would expect to see growth there over the long term.

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

I think to Lubi point, if you look at the total distribution points in the U.S. we did see this 55% year-over-year increase, and that's not just adding a number of stores, but obviously being able to introduce new products into existing stores. And when you walk down the aisle, at retail, you do see just a few of Beyond Meat products in any given store. And so the opportunity to innovate across all three of our platforms, beef, pork and poultry and dramatically that increase those total distribution points is significant for Beyond Meat, and that's really our focus on the retail side.

Ben Theurer -- Barclays Investment Bank -- Analyst

OK. Perfect. Thank you very much.

Operator

And our next question comes from the line of Michael Lavery from Piper Sandler. Please go ahead.

Michael Lavery -- Piper Sandler & Co. -- Analyst

Thank you. Good afternoon. You called out the 70% increase in your manufacturing capacity, but you're certainly also looking at a near-term run rate from sales that not that close to that level. Is the right way to think about bridging that gap there that you anticipate the capacity facilitating so that you would have volume bump and some sales lift, but not in the magnitude of a 70% range? How do you think about the side on us capacity basically?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, Yes, that's a good question. So I think it is a combination of these efficiencies we're going to be driving through increased throughput and all the other cost down programs that we're pursuing. But also to think about the number of partnerships we have in place and the amount of preparing we're doing for those partnerships. And then what I just said about the U.S.

retail to be layered on top of that in terms of different form factors. And so you see a steady improvement in the COGS structure as we implement this cost-down program on our existing product lines, the ability to offer those to consumers at a lower price. And then you layer on the strategic launches with our partners and then the new innovation coming across those three platforms, and that's how you bridge that.

Michael Lavery -- Piper Sandler & Co. -- Analyst

OK. That's helpful. And just a follow-up on the U.S. Foodservice outlets.

You've got the 34,000 you're calling out this quarter now. I guess just how current or accurate is that? And maybe specifically thinking is all the Dunkin' update reflected there already? Or is there some trickle to come? Can you help us understand how we have in mind for 3Q and beyond?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

I think similar to what I was saying earlier about I think you're going to see activity in the balance of the year from some of our QSR partners bit large. But in terms of meaningful additions of stores, that's something we probably can't comment on without -- yes, anyway, probably just can't comment on it one way or the other.

Michael Lavery -- Piper Sandler & Co. -- Analyst

But I guess just specifically, what you know has already happened in the last quarter or I guess even this month is reflected in that 34%?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, yes.

Michael Lavery -- Piper Sandler & Co. -- Analyst

OK. Great. Thanks.

Operator

And our last question comes from the line of Ryan Bell with Consumer Edge Research. Please go ahead.

Ryan Bell -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

Hey everyone. I know we know we can get a reasonably good sense of your share within U.S. track channels. It's obviously a lot harder for us to get a read on the competitive positioning within Foodservice, just overall maybe a difficult question to answer.

But would you be able to give us a sense as to where you stand just from a broad share perspective for meat alternative products in Foodservice relative to some of your competitors?

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. I mean so the good news on both the retail and Foodservice side of our business, we hold the No. 1 position in terms of the product and then on the retail side and brand on the Foodservice side. And that's the NPD data, which is the broadline distribution, not direct delivery.

And so doing really well there. And it's both up and down the street business, where not the larger chains or regional changes, but the independent operators. We're doing well there. We're seeing good growth there.

And then, of course, the regional and national and global QSRs. So even the partnerships, if you look at that, it's a good way to assess in the partnerships we have with McDonald's with Yum! across the KFC, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell banners. We're really well positioned in the Foodservice space. Lubi, you want to add to that?

Lubi Kutua -- Vice President, FP&A and Investor Relations

The only other thing that I would add to that, Ryan, is that it's very difficult, right, to get a accurate picture of the entire Foodservice space because to Ethan's point, the data that we're looking at and we're referencing and we're sharing with you guys is NPD data which, for the most part, excludes the largest QSRs, right? Those are typically your direct delivery type of customers. And so it's very hard to get the entire view. But as Ethan said, at least from the data that we do see, which is the NPD data, which is primarily broadline distribution, we have the No. 1 market share position there.

And so we feel really good about our positioning. And then obviously, we're going to continue to pursue growth with some of the large strategic QSR partners out there, which would not be captured in that number.

Ryan Bell -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

OK. So it's fair to say that from what you can see in that data that you feel that you're gaining share?

Lubi Kutua -- Vice President, FP&A and Investor Relations

We've certainly gained share within the NPD tracked channels, yes, and we continue to hold the No. 1 share there. So...

Ryan Bell -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

Great. And one last one for me, sort of a bigger picture question. When you're thinking about the broader household penetration and purchase frequency, your products relative to traditional meat analogs. How far along that journey are you in terms of the comparison of looking at, say, like the weekly and monthly household penetration, repeat rates and just the general utilization? I know that we're seeing gains overall, you're looking at an annual basis, you sort of see it in different time frames, but I would assume that you guys are still quite far off from where traditional meat products are and that provides a strong runway for incremental growth there?

Lubi Kutua -- Vice President, FP&A and Investor Relations

Yes, sure. I can take that. Yes. Look, I think there is still a pretty wide gap between the entire category, plant-based meat and animal protein.

And so to your point, right, I think what that means to us is that there is a significant opportunity, right, to continue to grow this business. So we are not looking at our household penetration on a weekly basis. But certainly, when we get updates, we are pleased to see that it continues to tick up. And in fact, the sequential increase that we saw in this quarter was quite a step up versus the last couple of quarters.

And so we're really pleased with the way the overall growth in the business is trending, but there is still a huge, huge market out there, right, when you start to compare us to animal protein. So we obviously want to try to capture as much of that opportunity as we can over the long term.

Ryan Bell -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

Thank you.

Operator

And we have no other questions in the queue at this time.

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Great. So I'll just offer a few remarks before we sign off here. First and foremost, as we were talking about with the company, and we're very hopeful that everybody we'll go out and get vaccinated, so we can all get back to business, get back to school and put this thing behind us. We're certainly encouraging that in a significant way here at the company.

This last quarter, Q2 was our largest revenue quarter ever. So record revenue and by quite a margin. So we're really excited about that. Keep commercializing its new products and the launches that I mentioned were just very important and exciting milestones for our company, continuing to maintain that top four of the six items in the category in retail and have that No.

1 position, and then continue to advance these global partnerships and putting infrastructure in place in the EU and in China to be able to be of service. So many exciting things happening and we did want to offer this more conservative look at Q3 just because there is so much ambiguity in terms of these broader market conditions. And we look forward to coming back and talking to you guys again in a few months and hopefully having a lot more clarity on where the general economy is. So thanks very much.

Phil Hardin -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Operator

[Operator signoff]

Duration: 75 minutes

Call participants:

Lubi Kutua -- Vice President, FP&A and Investor Relations

Ethan Brown -- Founder, President, and Chief Executive Officer

Philip Hardin -- Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

Rob Moskow -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Alexia Howard -- Sanford C. Bernstein -- Analyst

Adam Samuelson -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Phil Hardin -- Chief Financial Officer

Bryan Spillane -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Ken Goldman -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

Rob Dickerson -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Rupesh Parikh -- Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. -- Analyst

Ben Theurer -- Barclays Investment Bank -- Analyst

Michael Lavery -- Piper Sandler & Co. -- Analyst

Ryan Bell -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

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