Last week, Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT) announced it was buying LinkedIn (NYSE:LNKD) -- the tech giant's biggest acquisition yet.

In this clip from the Industry Focus: Tech podcast, Dylan Lewis and Daniel Sparks go over some of the numbers from the deal, and what it means for the two companies going forward.

A transcript follows the video.

This podcast was recorded on June 17, 2016. 

Dylan Lewis: The tech news that overwhelmed financial media this week: LinkedIn and Microsoft. Probably one of the bigger mergers in tech history, certainly the largest that Microsoft has decided to take on. Let's walk through the details of the deal.

Daniel Sparks: Monday, we wake up to a big stock move. LinkedIn and Microsoft announced a big deal. In fact, it was Microsoft's biggest acquisition in history ever, paying $26.2 billion for the company. It comes out to $196 per share, which represents a 50% premium from where the stock was trading before the announcement. That's why the stock moved so big that day. 

Mainly, Microsoft made this deal because LinkedIn is a solid investment in its own right. This is evident by the fact that Microsoft decided to keep LinkedIn's identity intact as its own unique culture and business, bring in their CEO, leave him operating the company.

Lewis: So, in a lot of ways, while this is an acquisition, LinkedIn is going to maintain some independence. It seems like they're going to be a sectioned-off business unit in Microsoft in that, while there will be a lot of collaboration and sharing some of the graphs and things like that that connect users on the Office platform and the LinkedIn platform, LinkedIn will keep this unique brand, corporate culture, and identity.

Daniel Sparks has no position in any stocks mentioned. Dylan Lewis has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of LinkedIn and Microsoft. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.