There are many important issues in our economy and on our stock markets that need to be addressed. There are also a host of smaller, nagging, annoying little problems that should raise all our hackles.

Well, at least they bug Motley Fool co-founder David Gardner. In this series from the Rule Breaker Investing podcast, he takes aim at several tiny yet irritating quirks of the market and the wider economy.

In this installment, David finally, finally gets to the end of his pet-peeves list. And what's there? Why, lather-less hand soaps and people and, well, people with long lists of pet peeves.

A transcript follows the video.

This podcast was recorded on July 20, 2016.

David Gardner: Just two more here, as we close out this week's Rule Breaker Investing. Two more, ridiculous, we can be quick on these. One is just, very simply, hand soaps that don't lather. Does this not drive you crazy? It drives me crazy.

Usually these are small. They're often in more upscale house bathrooms, maybe? Or maybe at the country club. I'm not really sure. They're usually perfumed. They'll fit in your palm. Sometimes they'll be rounder than soaps should be, in my experience.

And you're trying to wash your hands. You turn on the cold-water faucet, and you're just rubbing your hands together with this thing in between them, and no soap is coming out! Nothing positive is happening! This is like the antithesis of actual soap!

And it's sold probably at higher margins and ends up in the bathrooms of some friends and family of mine. Perhaps yours as well. So hand soaps should always lather. I'm glad we've cleared this one up.

And finally, the only way to end this unique Rule Breaker Investing podcast is with my final pet peeve, and it's very simply people who keep really long lists of pet peeves. And, you know, maybe go on about them. Maybe like on podcasts. On the internet.

Thanks for listening to this special episode of Rule Breaker Investing. Back next week with your Mailbag. Fool on!

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