Some payouts grow up in a hurry. Camping World Holdings (CWH 1.21%) announced on Monday that it's doubling its quarterly dividend to $0.50 a share, a move that pushes its yield up to 5.4% as of Monday's close. 

Investors haven't necessarily approached the leading retailer of recreational vehicles and related camping gear as an income stock, despite a healthy recent track record of hikes and declaring special distributions. Camping World has been one of the market's biggest winners since the pandemic sell-off bottomed out, a scintillating 11-bagger since last year's springtime low. Now a stock that was trading as low as $3.40 in March of last year is delivering $2 a share in annual dividends with analysts projecting a profit of $6.04 for all of 2021. It all seems so obvious now with folks falling in love with RV travel again as a way to get around safely in the new normal. Stop kicking yourself. Kick the tires instead.

Camping World's dividend doubled overnight. Let's look at some companies that are positioned well to double their payouts in the next couple of years: Tanger Factory Outlet Centers (SKT 1.33%) and NetEase (NTES -4.50%)

Two people pushing a giant piggy bank up an incline.

Image source: Getty Images.

Tanger Factory Outlet Stores

We're shopping locally again, and that's great news for Tanger Factory Outlet Stores. The operator of 36 open-air outlet shopping centers is already ahead of where it was before the pandemic upended the retail industry. Traffic to its centers during the second quarter that it posted earlier this month is ahead of where it was for the same period in 2019. Trailing-12-month tenant sales per square foot are 7% ahead of where Tanger was two years ago.

This all matters because somehow Tanger Factory Outlet Stores is paying out half the dividend it was two years ago. Shoppers are back. Occupancy levels and rent collection rates are moving higher. The current yield of 4.2% is certainly welcome, but with the outlet mall operator targeting core funds from operation of at least $1.52 a share for all of 2021 it's just a matter of time before the current quarterly distributions of $0.1775 a share return to pre-pandemic form. 

NetEase

Investors have been steering clear of Chinese growth stocks lately, and deservedly so given how regulatory agencies within the world's most populous country can take down a targeted niche, like for-profit educators this summer. 

NetEase knows the drill. It's been trading in the U.S. for more than two decades, and as an icon in online gaming it has felt the regulatory pressure of everything from the acceptable content of its diversions to how many internet cafes can exist in China during its formative years before connectivity was commonplace.

NetEase is a survivor. It's a thriver. The stock is nearly a 110-bagger since hitting the market at a split-adjusted price of $0.775 in 2000. It also rolled out an interesting way of returning money to its shareholders by committing to a quarterly dividend that equals between 20% to 30% of its anticipated after-tax earnings. NetEase with its current 1% yield may not turn a lot of heads, but getting that payout to double is just a matter of earning twice as much as it is now. 

Here's where we get to the consistency of NetEase. Outside of 2007 when its revenue rose a mere 2%, NetEase has posted at least double-digit top-line growth every single year as a public company. A lot has happened in and to China over the past 21 years, but NetEase has found a way to grow through it all. Analysts feel that it will double its earnings -- and its dividend -- by 2025 from last year's results. It can naturally get there faster if it grows faster than expected or improves its net margin from its current pace in the midteens. 

Whether you're looking for a payout to double fairly quickly -- like Camping World just did or Tanger Factory Outlet Stores as it returns to pre-pandemic levels -- or you're willing to play the NetEase long game, fast-growing dividends are there for the taking. A little growth along the way is just a welcome bonus.