Amazon.com (NASDAQ:AMZN) now has its own store brand. The old bricks-and-mortar retail industry is passing on another trick to the new online retailing sector.

Yep, just like Wal-Mart Stores (NYSE:WMT) has its "Sam's Choice" line of groceries and Sears Holdings (NASDAQ:SHLD) sells rebranded household appliances under the Kenmore name, Amazon now has its own brand name for low-priced, generic items.

The online store's first house-branded items are a bunch of blank CD and DVD discs, and a handful of cables for your electronics. In each case, the AmazonBasics product is simple, plainly designed -- and significantly cheaper than big-name alternatives. Amazon will still sell you a $200 Monster Cable HDMI connector for your high-definition TV, but you could also get an $8 cable from AmazonBasics. Best Buy (NYSE:BBY) has a basket of store brands for electronics, too, but the GeekSquad HDMI cable seems aimed at a different demographic and sells for about $90.

Online shoppers are often drawn to outlets like Amazon and Overstock.com (NYSE:OSTK) by the low prices to be found there. Amazon just upped the ante on that value proposition, albeit in a very narrow niche of its massive catalog. If the AmazonBasic cables and discs sell well, I'd expect Amazon to move into other product lines. Why should Sony (NYSE:SNE) and Panasonic (NYSE:PC) have all the fun and profits in categories like TV sets, Blu-ray players, and audio receivers?

We don't know much about who makes the cables, or what Amazon's gross margins might be on these sales. But it's a great way to raise the company's profile and strengthen the deep-value business case. Even if Amazon doesn't end up making huge profits from direct sales of these products, it's a smart branding move.

Would you buy AmazonBasic cables? How about a cheap TV? And if the stuff Amazon sells is so cheap, how come the stock is not? Let us know in the comments box below.

Amazon.com and Best Buy are Motley Fool Stock Advisor selections. Best Buy, Sears Holdings, and Wal-Mart Stores are Motley Fool Inside Value picks. The Fool owns shares of Best Buy. Try any of our Foolish newsletters today, free for 30 days.

Fool contributor Anders Bylund holds no position in any of the companies discussed here. You can check out Anders' holdings or a concise bio if you like. The Motley Fool is investors writing for investors.