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Here are five questions we'll answer on this weekend's Motley Fool Money radio show:

1. In the aftermath of the worst earthquake on record in Japan, what are the economic implications?

2. Facebook is getting into the video-streaming business. Netflix (Nasdaq: NFLX) says Facebook is no greater threat than any other competitor, but how scared should Netflix shareholders really be?

3. Microsoft's (Nasdaq: MSFT) Kinect is now the fastest-selling consumer device in history. So why isn't Mr. Softy getting more credit with the financial media? 

4. Starbucks (Nasdaq: SBUX) celebrated its 40th anniversary this week and announced a partnership with Green Mountain Coffee Roasters (Nasdaq: GMCR). As CEO Howard Schultz talks publicly about moving into "products that don't have coffee in them or coffee associated with them," is Starbucks now its own worst enemy? 

5. Febreze, the air freshener, is now Procter & Gamble's (NYSE: PG) 24th product to produce $1 billion in annual sales. How did it get there? Our guest panelist tells a Febreze story you'll never forget.

All that, plus ESPN's Chad Millman discusses the business of sports gambling, tells us why Las Vegas is more transparent than Wall Street, and offers some tips for your NCAA basketball tournament office pool. 

Listen now on Fool.com

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Chris Hill owns shares of Microsoft and Starbucks. Microsoft is a Motley Fool Inside Value recommendation. Green Mountain Coffee Roasters is a Motley Fool Rule Breakers choice. Netflix and Starbucks are Motley Fool Stock Advisor selections. Procter & Gamble is a Motley Fool Income Investor selection. Motley Fool Alpha has opened a short position on Green Mountain Coffee Roasters. Motley Fool Options has recommended a lurking gator position on Green Mountain Coffee Roasters and a diagonal call position on Microsoft. The Fool owns shares of Microsoft and Starbucks. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. The Motley Fool's disclosure policy loves March Madness.