However hard the market slams a stock, there's always the chance it'll come bouncing right back. We'll consult our Motley Fool CAPS community to find shares on the rebound, examining one specific sector of the economy in search of companies with rising CAPS ratings.          

There are 103 stocks listed under "leisure" in the CAPS' screener, but more than a handful of them carry well-respected four- and five-star ratings. Those accolades mean our 170,000 CAPS members are confident that these stocks will beat the market in the months ahead, but let's see what members are saying about the ones below:

Company

CAPS Rating 
(out of 5)

Recent Price

52-Week Price Change

Est.

5-Year Growth Rate

Arcos Dorados (Nasdaq: ARCO) **** $23.14 NA 27%
Jamba (Nasdaq: JMBA) **** $2.24 (6%) 16%
Tim Hortons (NYSE: THI) ***** $46.64 41% 15%

Source: Motley Fool CAPS; Yahoo! Finance. NA = not available.

The markets have been on a roller-coaster ride lately, but with the S&P 500 up 22% over last year, it's probably not too surprising the CAPS leisure stocks have fairly mimicked this feel-good attitude, rising almost 25% in that same time span. So let's take a closer look at why investors think some of these other companies won't be jumping from the frying pan into the fire now that the markets are roiled again.

Some spring in its step
Although the Latin American franchisee for McDonald's (NYSE: MCD) only went public last month, Arcos Dorados (Spanish for "golden arches") has been operational since 2007 and has already proven there is a growing appetite for the burger joint in countries like Brazil, Venezuela, and Argentina, as well as the Caribbean.

Arcos is McDonald's biggest franchisee, with more than 1,750 stores representing 5% of the parent's 2010 revenues. Interestingly, while Arcos is a franchisee itself, its agreement with McDonald's allows it to offer franchises too, and more than a quarter of its stores operate as such.

While McDonald's owns about one-fifth of the fast food market globally, competing against Burger King, Wendy's/Arby's (NYSE: WEN), and Yum! Brands (NYSE: YUM), in Latin America Arcos Dorados holds a 12% share, suggesting room for additional gains. Its nearest competitor, Burger King, has less than 4% market share according to Euromonitor.

That kind of demographics suggest the reason why CAPS All-Stars are virtually unanimous in their belief the fast food chain will outperform the broad market averages. And the one member who did give it a thumbs-down, TotoMMB, aside from wanting to be contrarian, thinks the negative case might just be a short-term event:

Went negative for two reasons...1) I think the IPO haze will fade in the short term. Plus, when the broader market dips, people will flee (again, in the short term). 2) I just wanted to go against the grain...

Dine on other opinions on the Arcos Dorados CAPS page and add the burger shop to your watchlist to see if there's gold to be found under its arches.

No foundation underfoot
We recently noted smoothie maker Jamba was in a transitional period, moving from a company-owed store format to a more franchisee-owned model and the change in style would likely dampen the top line for a period. Its latest quarterly report showed just that occurring, as sales fell 18% from the year-ago period, though still ahead of Wall Street's forecast. And while it missed analyst expectations on profits, the losses it recorded were narrower than a year ago. It looks like it's moving in the right direction.

Jamba showed that smoothies can be good business, and that attracted McDonald's, Starbucks (Nasdaq: SBUX), and others to the niche, but co-branding deals with Nestle and PepsiCo should give it an edge and expand its consumer base.

CAPS All-Star TheMiracleDJR thinks Jamba is a great company, but has serious reservations about its ability to beat the market:

You walk into the store here in downtown Chicago and there's always an OK little line, but when workers have to spend so long making smoothies and hand-dripping organic coffee, it's impossible to see how big volume ever gets there. They just can't move the line quickly enough.

Can Jamba drink from the cup of growth again? Let us know your opinion on the Jamba CAPS page.

A steaming cup of growth
While Americans can get a cup of coffee in any number of places, from Starbucks to 7-11, Canadians, it seems, are more particular and flock to basically one spot: Tim Hortons. With almost 3,200 restaurants north of the border, Tim serves 80% of the coffee served in Canada.

That explains why it's a successful chain, and having the right person at the top is critical for its continued growth. So news that its CEO abruptly left the company over an inability to agree on a transitional arrangement could set Tim Hortons back. The stock pulled back after the announcement, and is about 8% below its 52-week high -- which is also its all-time high -- of $51 a share.

With 93% of the CAPS members rating Tim Horton's to outperform the broad market averages, it appears they're none too concerned about the company being able to find a qualified replacement. Keep an eye on the developments in the Great White North by adding Tim Hortons to the Fool's free portfolio tracker.

The ball's in your court
There are many factors that go into whether a stock is a buy or sell, so it pays to start your own research on these stocks on Motley Fool CAPS. Read a company's financial reports, scrutinize key data and charts, and examine the comments your fellow investors have made, all from a stock's CAPS page. Head over to CAPS today and share your thoughts with other investor analysts on whether you think these stocks are ready to bound higher.

The Motley Fool owns shares of PepsiCo, Yum! Brands, and Starbucks. Motley Fool newsletter services have recommended buying shares of Starbucks, McDonald's, Tim Hortons, and PepsiCo, as well as creating a diagonal call position in PepsiCo. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Fool contributor Rich Duprey does not have a financial position in any of the stocks mentioned in this article. You can see his holdings here.