What: Shares of Rapid7 (NASDAQ:RPD) skyrocketed nearly 57% following the cybersecurity specialist's initial public offering.

So what: Regulatory filings last week revealed Rapid7 intended to offer 6.45 million shares of its common stock at a price between $13.00 and $15.00 per share. But yesterday, Rapid7 announced IPO pricing would be above its initial expected range at $16 per share. Rapid7 also granted the underwriters a 30-day option to buy up to an additional 967,500 shares for possible over-allotments 

When Rapid7 began trading today, however, the stock quickly jumped to its current levels above $25 per share as investors remained excited about its fast-growing business. According to Rapid7's S-1 filing with the SEC, it already counts 3,900 customers in more than 90 countries, including 30% of the Fortune 1000. Rapid 7 also achieved 35% compound annual revenue growth from 2011 through 2014, while 61% of its $76.9 million in total 2014 sales came from enterprise customers.

Now what: At the same time, note Rapid7 is not currently profitable, and incurred a net loss of $32.6 million last year. To be fair, it's not uncommon to see tech companies temporarily shunning bottom-line profits as they invest for top-line growth. And that's especially so in the burgeoning cybersecurity industry, as companies work to secure as large a slice of the market as possible in these early stages.

For now, however, I don't mind watching Rapid7 from the sidelines until the dust settles around its IPO. That may mean missing out on some short-term gains if the market decides it wants to continue bidding up the Rapid7 stock. But for me, until Rapid7 gets at least one quarter under its belt as a publicly traded company, the risk of a sudden pullback amid this early volatility is too great for my investing taste.

Steve Symington has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.