10 Top-Selling Products Still Made in America

Author: Rich Duprey | July 01, 2020

Young boy wearing USA tank top and holding american flag.

Source: Getty Images

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There's nothing quite like homemade

With many Americans forced to stay closer to home this Fourth of July because of a global pandemic, any products they're thinking about buying might just be those that are made by their friends and neighbors, rather than some distant, foreign conglomerate.

Although today's hyper-connected world makes finding truly "Made in America" goods more difficult, what follows are 10 products that still hail from the good ol' U.S. of A.

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A Briggs & Stratton lawn mower.

Source: Briggs & Stratton

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1. Briggs & Stratton engines

There's a good chance if you have a small engine around your house -- a lawn mower or generator -- it has a Briggs & Stratton (NYSE: BGG) engine in it. The company markets products under its own brand name, as well as Snapper, Murray, and Victa, as well as Craftsman and Troy-Bilt.

The company began manufacturing in Milwaukee, WI. in 1908 and today has nine plants in the U.S. and one each in Australia and China. Some 85% of its products are built here in the U.S.

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Buck Knife Model 110.

Source: Buck Knives

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2. Buck Knives folding knives

Hoyt Buck made his first knife in 1902 by hand and is credited with developing the folding hunting knife. So popular did it become that similar knives made by other manufacturers are routinely called buck knives. The classic lock-back folding Model 110 knife is still made in America, as are most of those the company produces.

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Assortment of Burt's Bees creams

Source: Burt's Bees

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3. Burt's Bees balms and creams

Although purchased by Clorox (NYSE: CLX) in 2007 for $925 million, the personal care products business built by Maine beekeeper Burt Shavitz, Burt's Bees, is still grounded in the U.S. and produced in North Carolina.

Many of its creams, lotions, and lip balms still contain a bit of beeswax as a natural emulsifier, just as Shavitz added when he was making the products himself.

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Dogs wearing Carhartt dog coat.

Source: Carhartt

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4. Carhartt work clothes

While many clothing companies have moved production overseas where labor is cheap, iconic work clothes manufacturer Carhartt still produces a full line of gear made at one of its four factories in Kentucky and Tennessee. It says no other brand makes more work clothes in America than it does, and that includes its snaps and fasteners, which are often outsourced. Carhartts, though, are made by Kentucky's YKK (check your zipper, it's probably made by them).

5 Winning Stocks Under $49 We hear it over and over from investors, “I wish I had bought Amazon or Netflix when they were first recommended by the Motley Fool. I’d be sitting on a gold mine!” And it’s true. And while Amazon and Netflix have had a good run, we think these 5 other stocks are screaming buys. And you can buy them now for less than $49 a share! Simply click here to learn how to get your copy of “5 Growth Stocks Under $49” for FREE for a limited time only.

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Women drinking glasses of soda.

Source: Getty Images

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5. Coca-Cola soda

While Coca-Cola (NYSE: KO) produces over 500 non-alcoholic beverages and owns four of the world's top five such drinks, it is of course best known for its soda. Yet it actually leaves the bottling of that sweet, carbonated beverage to its bottling partners, most of whom have production facilities all across the country, as well as globally.

Coca-Cola primarily produces the syrup concentrates that create its beverages, though it does also produce finished products too, such as water, sports drinks, juices, and more here in the U.S. Although soda consumption has declined over the years, Coke remains one of the most-recognized American brands.

ALSO READ: Coca-Cola Is a Cash Flow Machine: Here's Why

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Boxes of Crayola crayons.

Source: Crayola

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6. Crayola crayons

Crayola is synonymous with crayons, and though the company was first formed as Binney & Smith in 1885, when Alice Binney coined the name "Crayola" in 1903, an icon was born. The crayon-maker makes all of its crayons at its Easton, PA. factory, which also offers tours of its facilities.

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Woman riding a Cub Cadet riding mower.

Source: Cub Cadet

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7. Cub Cadet

The Cub Cadet division of MTD Products has been making lawn and garden equipment at its manufacturing facilities in Ohio, Mississippi, and Tennessee since 1961. In 2018, Stanley Black & Decker (NYSE: SWK) bought a 20% stake in MTD for $234 million and has an option to buy the remaining 80% starting July 1, 2021, though it should remain business as usual for this lawn-care leader.

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The Goodyear blimp.

Source: Goodyear Tire & Rubber

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8. Goodyear tires

Founded in 1898, Goodyear Tire & Rubber (Nasdaq: GT) is the premier U.S. tire company with $14.7 billion in annual sales last year. While it is a multinational corporation today with 47 facilities in 21 countries, it's in the U.S. where the rubber hits the road as Goodyear continues to manufacture consumer tires at its plants in Alabama, North Carolina, and Oklahoma.

Want to know if your tire is American-made? Tires made in the U.S. have a Department of Transportation serial number embossed on the inside sidewall near the rim. Look for DOT followed by eight to 13 numbers or letters to find out your tire's size, manufacturer, week and year of manufacture, and where it was made.

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A bottle of Gorilla Glue wood glue.

Source: Gorilla Glue

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9. Gorilla Glue polyurethane glue

The Gorilla Glue company is a family-owned business based in Cincinnati, Ohio, where it produces its famous adhesives and tape. Originally operating as the Lutz File & Tool Co. (it still makes tools under that brand name), it acquired the Gorilla brand of polyurethane glue in 1997 and subsequently expanded into hand and foot creams when it acquired the O'Keeffe's company in 2010.

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Motorcycle in front of the Washington Monument

Source: Getty Images

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10. Harley-Davidson motorcycles

No list of American-made products would be complete without Harley-Davidson (NYSE: HOG) motorcycles. Although sales have fallen for several years running, they are as close as you can get to the spirit of American freedom and the open road. Their idiosyncratic big, burly design exudes the country's individualistic ideals that have made them a part of our heritage and pop culture.

Harley-Davidson does have facilities in international markets, but most are assembly plants, meaning employees are putting together bikes that were manufactured in the U.S. However, all Harleys made for the U.S. market have been made in the U.S.

5 Winning Stocks Under $49 We hear it over and over from investors, “I wish I had bought Amazon or Netflix when they were first recommended by the Motley Fool. I’d be sitting on a gold mine!” And it’s true. And while Amazon and Netflix have had a good run, we think these 5 other stocks are screaming buys. And you can buy them now for less than $49 a share! Simply click here to learn how to get your copy of “5 Growth Stocks Under $49” for FREE for a limited time only.

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A group of friends outdoors holding an American flag at their backs.

Source: Getty Images

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Celebrate the red, white, and blue

The country may be experiencing another spasm of conflict as it confronts the challenges of protest, controversy, a worldwide health crisis, and more, and yet it has done so numerous times over the last 244 years.

Each time, like the storied brands included here, it has endured. This July Fourth, celebrate the ingenuity that has evolved from allowing that creative spirit to run free.

Rich Duprey has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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