12 Retailers That Will Deliver Your Order

Author: Christy Bieber | April 05, 2020

Grovery Delivery

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Delivery is an available -- and safe -- option during the coronavirus crisis

Across America, millions of people are staying at home in an effort to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19. If you're remaining in your house, you're doing the right thing for yourself and for the vulnerable in your community -- but you still need groceries, prescriptions, and other essentials.

The good news is, there are plenty of retailers still offering delivery, so you should be able to get everything you need sent right to your home. And most experts agree that getting items delivered is safe -- especially if you opt for contactless delivery with items left at your doorstep and you wash your hands after putting packages away.

Not sure where to shop for the items you need? Check out these companies willing to deliver while you're social distancing at home.

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An Amazon driver reviews an order

Source: Amazon

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1. Amazon grocery delivery

Amazon (Nasdaq: AMZN) is prioritizing the delivery of essentials during the coronavirus crisis so those looking for household and health items can turn to this online behemoth to get much of what they need.

That includes groceries in many parts of the country. Amazon provides three different options for grocery delivery, depending where you live: Amazon Fresh, Whole Foods, or Prime Now.

Amazon's grocery delivery services are free to Prime members if orders are $35 or more and you opt for two hour delivery. While it may be difficult to get a delivery slot in some markets, Amazon indicates it is working to increase capacity.

ALSO READ: Amazon Partners with Lyft to Deliver Packages and Groceries

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A delivery man with packages at the door.

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2. Instacart

Instacart offers local delivery from stores in your area, including both grocery stores and big box stores such as Sams Club or Costco. The fee for delivery depends on the size of your order and the delivery time you pick.

You can become an Instacart Express member to get free delivery on orders over $35, but there's a $99 annual membership fee if you choose this option.

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Person ordering from Grubhub on their smartphone.

Source: Grubhub

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3. Grubhub

Grubhub (NYSE: GRUB) offers delivery from restaurants in your local area. You can also order takeout through its app. Delivery fees and order minimums vary by restaurant and there's never a minimum order required for takeout.

The company is not only continuing to deliver during the coronavirus crisis but Grubhub also announced it would temporarily suspend the collection of up to $100 million in commission fees from independent restaurants. While this doesn't cut your costs, it could help your local favorites to survive the pandemic.

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Takeout boxes full of various foods.

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4. DoorDash

Like Grubhub, DoorDash enables you to get food delivered from both national chain restaurants and local eateries. Delivery fees and order minimums vary and the app has opted to make contactless deliveries the default during the COVID-19 pandemic.

DoorDash has also announced it's partnering with convenience stores across the country so you can get household products delivered as well -- often with no delivery fees.

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Young male ordering takeout from his laptop computer.

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5. Uber Eats

Uber Eats, an offering by Uber (NYSE: UBER), is yet another food delivery service similar to Grubhub and DoorDash. You can sign up for the app to have food brought to your door from both local restaurants and major restaurant chains.

Uber Eats is even waiving delivery fees from more than 100,000 local restaurants so you can support your local favorites without added costs.

ALSO READ: McDonald's Waives Delivery Fees for Uber Eats, DoorDash

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Arms reach across a dinner table full of food to toast with glasses.

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6. Seamless

Seamless is similar to some of the other services on this list and, in fact, is part of the Grubhub family of brands. Like Grubhub, DoorDash, and Uber Eats, Seamless provides delivery and take-out options from local restaurants.

New customers get free delivery on their first order and delivery prices and order minimums vary by restaurant. Seamless is also waiving commission fees for independent restaurants during the coronavirus crisis.

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A pharmacy employees hands woman her prescriptions.

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7. CVS

CVS, (NYSE: CVS) a national drug store chain, is offering customers free delivery on prescriptions and household essentials during the coronavirus crisis.

You'll have the option to choose one- or two-day delivery at no cost, but you'll have to sign up for the app or text alerts to be notified of delivery options.

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Older woman in a drugstore.

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8. Walgreens

Walgreens, (Nasdaq: WBA) like CVS, wants to make it easy for customers to get their prescriptions and other essentials while they're stuck at home. They've announced that all deliveries will be free from Walgreens.com during the coronavirus crisis, regardless of the size of the order.

Walgreens has also partnered with Postmates to provide faster delivery to customers in 14 cities across the U.S.

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Couple preparing meal together using fresh ingredients.

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9. Meal kit delivery services

There's a long list of meal delivery services including Blue Apron (NYSE: APRN), Green Chef, HelloFresh, Martha & Marley Spoon, and SunBasket.

These services are still delivering and each brings complete meals to your door ready for you to prepare. Each service works slightly differently, but they all give you the option to choose the number of meals you want per week, the number of people you're cooking for, and your delivery date.

Meal prices also vary. With Hello Fresh and BlueApron, for example, prices start at $7.49 per meal, while Green Chef, which offers organic options, starts at $9.99 per meal for a plant-powered plan and $10.99 per meal for a family plan that includes a mix of meat and veggie-based selections.

Most services offer discounts for new customers, so you could try them all out and get a bargain on each.

ALSO READ: Why the Feasting in Blue Apron Stock Will Soon Turn to Famine

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A man looks sad carrying a grocery bag.

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10. Postmates

Postmates offers restaurant delivery and more to people in cities across the U.S. In addition to food from restaurants in your area, you may be able to get groceries and alcohol delivered as well.

Postmates offers a membership option, Postmates Unlimited, which enables you to get free delivery on every order over $12 and avoid blitz pricing during times of high demand. You can sign up for a seven-day free trial for this service, which normally costs $9.99 monthly or $99.99 per year.

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A modern Target store.

Source: Target

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11. Target

Target (NYSE: TGT) offers same-day grocery delivery through Shipt. Customers can sign up for a four-week free trial or for a Shipt plan that's $99 per year and enables free delivery on orders of $35 or more.

Shipt is available in most areas and you can get both groceries and household essentials sent directly to you.

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Fresh vegetables in a crate sitting on a wooden table.

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12. Misfits Market

Misfits Market offers fresh organic produce delivered right to your door at up to a 40% savings compared with what you'd pay in the grocery store.

This subscription service makes sure unattractive or oddly sized fruits and veggies get used, saving you money on your fresh produce while cutting down on food waste. Boxes start at $22 and you'll pay a $4.50 delivery fee per box (or $5.50 in Florida and Tennessee).

You choose the size of your box and delivery frequency when you first sign up, although high demand during the coronavirus crisis means new customers will have their first order delayed by two to three weeks.

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A woman signs for her package.

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Remember to tip your delivery driver

As you can see, there are plenty of options for getting groceries, restaurant food, prescriptions, and more delivered right to your door. Just remember to be generous in tipping your delivery driver, as he or she is out there working to bring you what you need while you stay at home and do your part to help slow the spread of coronavirus.

John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Christy Bieber has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Amazon. The Motley Fool recommends Costco Wholesale, CVS Health, and Uber Technologies and recommends the following options: short January 2022 $1940 calls on Amazon and long January 2022 $1920 calls on Amazon. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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