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Automatic Data Processing Inc  (NASDAQ:ADP)
Q3 2019 Earnings Call
May. 01, 2019, 8:30 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good morning. My name is Brian, and I will be your conference operator. At this time, I would like to welcome everyone to ADP's Third Quarter Fiscal 2019 Earnings Call. I would like to inform you this conference is being recorded, and all lines have been placed on mute to prevent any background noise. After the speakers' remarks, there will be a question-and-answer session. (Operator instructions) Thank you.

I will now turn the conference over to Christian Greyenbuhl, Vice President, Investor Relations. Please go ahead.

Christian Greyenbuhl -- Vice President, Investor Relations

Thank you, Brian, and good morning, everyone. Thank you for joining ADP's third quarter fiscal 2019 earnings call and webcast. (Technical Difficulty) Earlier this morning, we released our results for the third quarter of fiscal 2019. These earnings materials are available on the SEC's website and our Investor Relations website at investors.adp.com, where you will also find the quarterly investor presentation that accompanies today's call as well as our quarterly history of revenue and pre-tax earnings by reportable segment.

During our call today, we will reference non-GAAP financial measures, which we believe to be useful to investors, and that exclude the impact of certain items in the third quarter and full year of fiscal 2019 as well as the third quarter and full year of fiscal 2018. Description of these items and a reconciliation of these non-GAAP measures can be found in our earnings release.

Today's call will also contain forward-looking statements that refer to future events, and as such, involve some risk. We encourage you to review our filings with the SEC for additional information on factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our current expectations. As always, please do not hesitate to reach out should you have any questions.

And with that, let me turn the call over to Carlos.

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Christian, and thank you, everyone, for joining our call. Before we get started with the earnings discussion, I'd first like to welcome Kathleen to the call, and to her new role as ADP's Chief Financial Officer. Kathleen comes to us with a strong operating background and we look forward to her contributions and partnership, as we execute on our transformation initiatives. I also know that she is looking forward to the opportunity to meet with you over the coming months.

Let's now move to a brief review of the quarter. John will then take us through the quarter's results in more detail, after which Kathleen will take us through an update to our fiscal 2019 outlook. This morning we reported our third quarter fiscal 2019 results with revenue of $3.8 billion, up 4% on a reported basis, 5% organic constant currency. This revenue growth was in line with our expectations and continued to be aided in part by the strength of our Employer Services' downmarket offerings and multinational solutions.

Our adjusted diluted earnings per share grew 13% to $1.77 per share, and benefited from continued strength in our margin performance, lower adjusted effective tax rate and fewer shares outstanding. We are pleased with the overall results this quarter and we believe our performance continues to highlight the underlying strength of our business model.

I'd now like to turn to our sales and marketing initiatives, starting with our solid 10% growth in Employer Services new business bookings for the quarter and then discuss some of our recent sales and marketing investments. First, we are pleased with our Employer Services new business bookings performance this quarter, which benefited from broad-based growth.

With three quarters behind us, we feel good about our overall progress this year. At the same time, we continuously work to identify new opportunities and investments in order to leverage our world-class sales force to help drive sustainable growth and build on our position as the leader in the growing global HCM market.

With this in mind, at the end of March, we completed an agreement with a mid-sized regional payroll services provider to convert their clients to Workforce Now or RUN depending on business needs and complexity. From time-to-time, we leverage our scale to engage in transactions like these where we acquire a client list from a third-party for the right to sell and convert those clients on to our platform. While historically not significant enough to call out, this transaction was larger than usual.

The timing of this agreement means that while it did not impact our third-quarter new business bookings performance, we do anticipate incremental benefit in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2019 from this investment together with some added expense pressure. We are confident that our sales force and implementation teams are well equipped to capture this new opportunity. However, the timing of the impact from our conversion efforts will depend on the needs of these clients.

With that said, as we work to execute on our plans to capture this new opportunity, we are raising our ES new business bookings guidance to 8% to 9% growth for fiscal 2019 from our prior guidance of 6% to 8% growth. This deal was not contemplated in our second quarter guidance, and we believe that even without this new opportunity, we would have achieved at least the low end of our previous guidance range.

Moving onto our recent brand initiatives. At ADP, we have always taken great pride in delivering solutions that help simplify complexities for our clients and their workers. Part of our transformation effort has been to execute toward that goal, and we've continued to make great progress on that front. With this progress in mind, earlier this year, we felt it was an opportune time to launch a new brand platform to better reflect the changes we've been making. This initiative represents an important step in our journey to enhance the employee experience, with innovative HCM solutions and insights designed with the worker as the central focus.

We carried those thoughts through our brand campaign which asks, what are you working for? In partnership with our clients, we asked them and others to share stories about the world of work through the eyes of their people, bringing to light a range of motivations and passions. A key insight from these discussions is that work is about more than what you do, it's about achieving something greater for oneself and others.

Our goal of this campaign is to elevate the discussion around the evolution of work and promote a dialog about what motivates people in the workforce, and how we at ADP in addressing these evolving needs are always designing for people. This new brand platform and tag line is an expression of what ADP stands for and reinforces our relentless determination to rethink a better, more personalized world at work, so everyone can achieve their full potential.

Continuing on the theme of work, a few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to attend our 26th Annual ADP Meeting of the Minds client conference. This event affords us the opportunity to engage in a deeper and broader manner with our larger enterprise clients on their challenges, while also sharing with them our perspectives on the latest trends in HCM, including what we're doing to help employers and their workers tackle these issues.

As the world of work changes, the challenges that employers face are becoming increasingly broad and complex. What was clear from the conference is that employers seek a strategic HCM partner, not just a software vendor. We are in need of expertise, someone they can trust and someone who will also help them rise to the new challenges in the face of an increasingly complex and fast-paced world of work; one where the work for talent remains intense.

With a record number of attendees at the conference this year, the feedback was very positive throughout the event. Clients and prospects were able to spend time learning about new products and functionality, not only from our experts, but also from nearly 40 of our strategic partners, including a record number from our ADP marketplace.

As a leading global technology company providing HCM solutions, we are uniquely positioned to help employers and their workers. Whether it's through solutions that can help them with recruitment to retirement or through our unmatched big data capabilities, I was proud of the reception we received for our continued efforts to deliver innovative solutions with excellent service.

The focus that we're putting on our products and services are only part of our strategy to deliver stronger solutions to our clients. We also believe in a more integrated product strategy and a more open ecosystem. We see shifts not only in how our clients want to connect with us, but also in how workers connect with each other. Notably, through collaboration platforms. These platforms are reshaping how people communicate and access information within a company.

With products like ADP's Virtual Assistant bot, employees and each of our leaders now have the convenience of a tool that can help them remove friction in the employee experience by allowing them within the collaboration platforms to view their pay summary and deductions, make time off requests and more. All while also reducing the time spent by HR and payroll practitioners on low value-added tax. This allows them to be more strategic and focused on driving business success.

Innovations like these that enhance the employer and employee experience are continuing to help drive improvements in our client satisfaction and net promoter scores, an important element in our ability to reaffirm our expectations of 25 basis points to 50 basis points of improvement in ES revenue retention for fiscal 2019.

Receiving positive recognition for our efforts from both our clients and third parties bolsters our confidence in our investments. Earlier this quarter, we were especially pleased when we were recognized for our vision and strategy by Everest Group who named ADP, a leader in the PEAK Matrix Multi-Country Payroll Outsourcing and Multi-Country Payroll Platform reports. And once again named ADP a leader and star performer in its annual PEAK Matrix for Multi-Process Human Resources Outsourcing providers. We were also proud to note that we were the only provider selected as both the leader and star performer among the vendors evaluated underscoring the strength of our position as well as the improvements we continue to make.

In April, we also announced that NelsonHall once again recognized ADP as the overall leader for next generation payroll services, highlighting ADP's ability to meet future client requirements and deliver immediate benefits to payroll services clients. It's rewarding when influencers and clients alike recognize us for our progress.

Now for one final thought before I hand the call over to John. At ADP we are proud of our efforts to foster our culture of learning and development in order to better attract, train and retain top talent. This is why I was especially pleased this quarter to see that we were once again included among LinkedIn's Top Companies for 2019. This award highlights the top 50 companies that were most in demand by job seekers, and I'm pleased to say that we moved up 21 places to number 20 on this list.

Overall, our investments in the business are showing positive momentum and we are pleased with the progress we are making against our objective of driving sustainable long-term growth.

With that, I'll turn the call over to John for his commentary on our third quarter results.

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Carlos, and good morning, everyone. Our consolidated revenue this quarter was $3.8 billion, up 4% on a reported basis, 5% organic constant currency. And as Carlos said, this was in line with our expectations. With that said, we have been seeing more pressure from the impact of FX, which drove approximately 1 percentage points of pressure this quarter. We continue to see strong momentum throughout our downmarket HCM offerings. In addition, excluding the impacts of FX, we are pleased to see continued underlying strength across our international offerings in particular from our multinational solutions.

I would also like to remind you of the PEO SUI revenue timing impact last quarter, which also impacted our third quarter consolidated revenue growth by approximately 1%, in PEO revenue growth by approximately 2%. There was no impact on our full year revenue estimates from this event. Our earnings before income taxes increased 12% and adjusted EBIT increased 10%. Adjusted EBIT margin was up about 140 basis points compared to last year's third quarter, and included 20 basis points of pressure from acquisitions. This margin improvement was slightly ahead of our expectation and benefited from a few key drivers.

In addition to benefiting from our early -- Voluntary Early Retirement Program, we also continue to see incremental efficiencies within our IT infrastructure, helping to drive improvements in our overall cost base. Also we continue to execute on a number of tactical and incremental transformation initiatives, which while none are individually significantly -- significant enough to call out collectively are helping to drive net productivity improvements across the business.

The benefits from these initiatives together with the impact from our underlying operating efforts were particularly -- partially offset by incremental investments in the third quarter related to the launch of our new brand platform and growth in selling expenses. Our adjusted effective tax rate was 23.5%, and benefited from the impact of corporate tax reform, certain tax credit adjustments and the release of reserves for certain tax positions, for uncertain tax positions, and a small amount of unplanned stock compensation tax benefit. This rate compares to our 24% adjusted effective tax rate for the third quarter of last year.

Adjusted diluted earnings per share grew 13% to $1.77, and in addition to benefiting from our margin expansion and the lower effective tax rate was also aided by fewer shares outstanding compared with a year ago.

Now for our segment results. For Employer Services, revenues grew 3% for the quarter, 4% organic constant currency, and were in line with expectations. As a reminder, we had anticipated a deceleration from the first half as we have now lapped the acquisitions of Global Cash Card and WorkMarket, and our revenue continues to be impacted by pressure from FX.

Interest income on client funds grew 24%, and benefited from a 30 basis points improvement in the average yield earned on our client fund investments and growth in average client funds balances of 4% compared to a year ago. This growth in balances was driven by a combination of client growth, wage inflation and growth in our pays for control offset by lower SUI collections.

Also, as we mentioned last quarter, we continue to expect lower SUI rates and the impact of FX to put added pressure onto our balance growth for the remainder of the year. Our same-store pays per control metric in the US grew 3.1% for the quarter.

Moving on to Employer Services margin, we saw an increase of about 230 basis points in the quarter, which includes approximately 30 basis points of pressure from the impact of acquisitions. This continued strength is a result of the same factors I mentioned earlier regarding our consolidated results, which are continuing to help to improve our underlying efficiencies.

Our PEO Services grew 6% in the quarter. And as I mentioned earlier, this revenue growth experienced approximately 2 percentage points of pressure in the third quarter due to the PEO SUI revenue timing impact we experienced last quarter. This pressure was also the primary driver for lower PEO revenues excluding zero margin benefit pass-throughs, which grew 2% for the quarter. This timing issue does not impact the full year revenue guidance that Kathleen will shortly discuss. Average worksite employees increased 8% to 554,000 for the quarter.

Overall, we continue to see some positive signs of normalization in the retention compared to the pressure we had seen last year among our larger PEO clients, and we're also starting to see some positive signs from the changes to our sales incentives that we made last year. We therefore maintain cautiously optimistic as we head into our fourth quarter regarding the continued gradual reacceleration of the growth in the average worksite employees. In particular, given the volatility we may experience during our fiscal year fourth quarter annual healthcare renewals.

The PEO segment's margins decreased 10 basis points for the quarter due to grow-over pressure from incremental selling expenses and adjustments to our loss reserve estimates related to ADP Indemnity, offset by operating leverage within the business and benefits from our voluntary early retirement program. This margin performance was ahead of our own expectations as we continue to see sequential reductions in our ADP Indemnity loss reserve estimates, as well as lower than expected growth in the zero margin pass-through revenues.

We continue to benefit from the underlying strength of our business model. We remain committed to reinvesting into the business and to leveraging the strength of our organization to drive change. Our results this quarter reflect our success in driving these initiatives and we are pleased with our progress this year.

And with that, I will now turn the call over to Kathleen for our fiscal year 2019 outlook.

Kathleen Winters -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, John, and thank you, Carlos, for the warm welcome to ADP. And good morning to everyone on the call. I'm looking forward to meeting many of you over the coming weeks and months.

I'll start now with the outlook for Employer Services. We now expect revenue growth for fiscal 2019 to be at the lower end of our previous guidance range of 5% to 6% growth. We narrowed our guidance this quarter, since we expect slightly elevated pressure from the impact of FX. And as I will discuss shortly, we have also narrowed down our guidance for interest income from client funds as a result of changes to the forward yield curve this quarter. We continue to anticipate growth of 2.5% in our pays per control metric. We are raising our fiscal 2019 ES new bookings -- new business bookings guidance to 8% to 9%.

Regarding the agreement that we completed in March, I'd like to highlight that this was not an acquisition of a business. We will however be recognizing an intangible asset for the acquired client list. We are not disclosing the purchase price for this asset, but you will see some activity related to this investment in additions to intangibles on our cash flow statement. And starting in the fourth quarter, we will begin to amortize this intangible asset in accordance with our policies for similar transactions.

While we anticipate incremental expense from our brand efforts and the increase in our sales guidance as well as incremental amortization related to intangible assets, we are raising our ES margin outlook and now anticipate full year ES margins to expand about 225 basis points from our prior forecast of 175 basis points to 200 basis points. Our outlook also continues to contemplate 50 basis points of acquisition drag for the year.

Moving on to the PEO. We continue to expect 9% to 10% PEO revenue growth in fiscal 2019, and 8% to 9% growth in average worksite employees. We also continue to anticipate 8% to 9% growth in PEO revenues excluding zero margin benefits pass-throughs. With the better-than-expected performance in our PEO margin this quarter, we now expect margins to be up 25 basis points to 50 basis points as compared to our prior forecast of at least flat. With the continued reduction in our loss reserves related to ADP Indemnity, we've adjusted our estimate to 25 basis points of grow-over pressure on a full year basis from our prior estimate of 50 basis points.

I'll now go to the consolidated outlook. With the adjustments to our ES revenue outlook, we now anticipate total revenue growth at the lower end of our 6% to 7% range for fiscal 2019. We continue to expect the growth in average client funds balances to be about 4%. We're adjusting slightly our expected growth in client funds interest revenue to about $90 million from our prior estimate of $90 million to $100 million, and for the total impact from the client funds extended investment strategy to grow about $70 million from our prior estimate of $70 million to $80 million. The details of this forecast can be found in the supplemental slides on our Investor Relations website.

We now anticipate our adjusted EBIT margin to expand at least 150 basis points compared to our prior forecast of 125 basis points to 150 basis points. This outlook continues to include approximately 30 basis points of pressure from acquisitions. With the benefits this quarter to our effective tax rate, we are lowering our adjusted effective tax rate expectation to 23.8% for fiscal 2019 compared to our prior estimate of 24.4%. And with these adjustments to our outlook, we now expect adjusted diluted earnings per share to grow 19% to 20% from our prior forecast of 17% to 19%. We continue to be pleased with our overall execution.

And with that I will turn it over to the operator to take your questions.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

Thank you. (Operator Instructions) We will take our first question from the line of Mark Marcon with Robert W. Baird. Your line is now open.

Mark Marcon -- Robert W. Baird -- Analyst

Good morning, and thanks for taking my question. Well, Carlos, John and Kathleen nice to meet you. I'm wondering if you can talk a little bit about the new type of deal in terms of taking over for existing payroll providers. Just how does that compare to when you win a new client, just from an economic perspective and how big is that opportunity as we look out over the next few years?

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

Well, in terms of helping you size it, I think that based on the comments we made about our new business bookings, I think you can back into, it's about a 2 percentage point to 3 percentage point impact for the year, our new business bookings growth. That gives you a sense of book -- from a bookings standpoint what the size of the opportunity is.

And just in terms of elaborating a little bit more on it, we actually do these types of deals on a much smaller basis, on a fairly regular basis, and have been doing them for 20 years to 30 years, where small providers that are either retiring or selling out want to sell their book of business, we're not really interested in buying additional platforms, or frankly taking infrastructure or offices and so forth, so we structure it really as an agreement where we buy the right to convert the clients. And we get some help and some assistance from the seller, but in essence, it looks a lot like a typical new business and the economics would look a lot like typical new business with the exception of course that we have to pay some acquisition cost, if you will, to the seller.

But the way we organize the effort is very similar to a typical sales effort in the sense that we send out either through our inside sales force or our field sales force people to get the client to sign a contract with ADP, because we're not buying contracts and we not buying the business, so they become an ADP client, on our pricing terms, and we, in essence, implement them with our resources onto our platforms. So, it looks a lot like business as usual. The reason we had to call it out, is obviously the size. These typically are frankly really small, couple of thousand, or even in the hundreds of clients, CPA firm or owner of a small payroll company maybe retiring. This is a much larger transaction that has a material -- somewhat material impact on our results and our guidance and we thought it was important to point out.

We are being a little bit coy about the details because obviously for competitive reasons, we are literally right in the middle of converting all these clients. So our sales force has already been out for several weeks, quote unquote selling and converting these clients and we've begun the implementation process. But most of our competitors are aware of this transaction that was going on. So, they're going after those clients as well. So we just rather not talk about it more than we have to just to make sure we give you the proper context and the proper guidance.

Mark Marcon -- Robert W. Baird -- Analyst

I just meant from a strategic perspective, longer term, do you see more of these types of opportunities coming up as you and some of the other large national players have invested more behind technology and smaller regional players just can't keep up?

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

Yes, I wouldn't call this a small regional players. So this is probably, as you get more information about it, I think it will become obvious. This is kind of the last of its kind as far as I'm aware. And just for historical purposes, I was personally involved in 2007, it was the first time that I met with this organization about trying to create an opportunity for us to acquire this business or in this case the right to convert these clients. And there were people before me who had already been having those discussions. So this has been going on for quite a long time. So, I would say this is in the category of relatively unique, and in terms of size, and also type of payroll provider that it is.

Mark Marcon -- Robert W. Baird -- Analyst

Great. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. And our next question will come from the line of Jason Kupferberg with Bank of America Merrill Lynch. Your line is now open.

Jason Kupferberg -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Hey, thanks. Good morning, guys. I just wanted to ask a follow-up on that point with this new agreement. Is there anything baked into the revenue guidance for the year? And can you give us a rough sense of how many clients this involves? And then just, was there any promotional pricing or any extra promotional pricing in Q3 to help fuel the bookings rebound that we saw, the 10%?

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

There was nothing incremental in Q3, in terms of answering that question first, which I think, is somewhat unrelated to the other questions. So the answer to that is nothing I'm aware of. There was no -- nothing artificial done or nothing -- remember the part I've tried to explain in the second quarter. And hopefully this is some indication that we were giving you guys the right story is that calendar wise we had some, a couple of days of selling that moved into the third quarter from the second quarter. So if you remember, we had relatively weak second quarter new business bookings. And so I think some of it is calendar. Frankly, it was even better than we expected based on just the calendar explanation. So I think it was just an overall good rebound and good performance.

In terms of the size of the transaction impact on revenues, just because of the mechanics that our business operates on, as I mentioned that our sales force is literally right now getting sales orders, converting the clients, and we have implementation people starting the implementation process. We have implemented some clients, but it was -- it's an insignificant impact on revenues for the fourth quarter, but a significant impact in bookings, in new business bookings, which is why we've adjusted the guidance the way we have.

The other factor that I would mention is as you do your work on margins and so forth, and you might notice some pressure in the fourth quarter, there was also again typical with the way our business works, we have significant pressure from an expense standpoint in the fourth quarter as a result of incremental selling expense. And in this case, we also have the amortization of the intangible without offsetting, quote unquote revenues, because they haven't started yet. Some of them are starting the most -- will impact our revenues in the first quarter and beyond of next fiscal year.

So it's a meaningful headwind from a cost standpoint. And then the other things to keep in mind is, if you recall, last year's fourth quarter, we had very, very strong margin improvement. So the comparison is difficult, plus we have this fairly significant expense pressure from this transaction which is obviously purchased in the fourth quarter and slightly dilutive. I think we've figured it's couple of pennies, I think we've talked about.

Kathleen Winters -- Chief Financial Officer

Yes. Couple of pennies in the fourth quarter.

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

But it will help us, I think, on a go-forward basis. Because obviously by the first quarter, almost all of that selling expense will have -- and implementation expense will be behind us, the amortization expense will still be with us, but most of the acquisition and implementation expenses will already be behind us, and then we have the revenue and incremental margin from that business.

So again, had we, just to make sure that we don't overcomplicate this, if we had a -- which we've had in the past. If we'd had a blow out fourth quarter sales results, it would be about the same discussion. We would have had a lot of incremental selling expense and implementation expense, and it would be good news for our future growth and for revenues, but it would be pressure in the short-term on the earnings.

Jason Kupferberg -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Right, right. So that kind of leads to my follow-up question just on margins, because obviously the execution continues to be very strong there. So you're absorbing some of these incremental cost, yet you did raise the guidance again for margins for this year. So I wanted to talk a little bit about just your plans to backfill some of the roles that are being vacated or had been vacated by the early retirement program. How you're thinking about that now versus what you initially envisioned in terms of a backfill percentage?

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

It's a great question. I think the way that I look at it, just from 40,000 foot level, is really headcount growth year-over-year, because there are so many other pieces of noise like this incremental expense pressure we have in fourth quarter. That's the best way to really kind of -- given that our most of our expenses really people related is really FTE growth year-over-year. And I think on that basis, as we expected and as we predicted, and as we encouraged the organization to do, we closed some of the gap that we had in the first quarter by the third quarter. So, we're still ahead. We wouldn't be increasing our guidance if we hadn't been still ahead. So, we're still little bit ahead of where we thought we would be in terms of not backfilling as much as we expected, but we closed some of that gap.

Now, that was the appropriate thing to do because we want to make sure that our client retention, our client satisfaction, our NPS scores stay, I think it's a record -- at the record levels that they are in some of our business units. So that was an important objective for us, which was to extract incremental margin and efficiency out of the organization, out of the business, but at the same time making sure that we stayed focused on client satisfaction and client service. I think we're -- I think we're doing it, I think we've landed the plane in a fairly good place. I think the organization responded well.

I think to the absorption of the early retirement reductions, as well as the reworking of some of the things that we do and some of the processes that we have in order to make sure that we can continue to deliver the high level of -- levels of service that we have with fewer people.

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

And maybe I'll add with -- nuts and bolts. As a reminder, we anticipated the impact of the voluntary early retirement program to have an annualized impact of approximately $150 million, and we are anticipating that to be true going forward. So, the overall opportunity has not increased, but we captured in this fiscal year, a higher percentage of that total number which we now expect slightly to be below that, and like $140 million, I would say, roughly $140 million to $150 million. So, we think, Jason, that the overall assumptions regarding the back hiring and the backfill remains intact.

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

And I think in terms of new context, this was a fairly large undertaking that we hadn't been through before. So, I think, in the context of the guesswork that went into the backfills and the pacing of those backfill. And so I think the organization did a great job.

Jason Kupferberg -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Okay. John, best of luck to you and Kathleen, and look forward to meeting soon.

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Kathleen Winters -- Chief Financial Officer

Likewise. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. And our next question will come from the line of Jim Schneider with Goldman Sachs. Your line is now open.

James Schneider -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Good morning. Thanks for taking my question and congratulations to both John and Kathleen. Maybe just to start out, maybe Carlos, can you provide a little bit of color on your view on where the PEO market demand stands right now? Anything that you're seeing that makes you kind of more or less encouraged of the demand outlook and your ability to kind of sustain the same pace of growth over the next few quarters as you have seen? And maybe kind of give us any color around the comment that I believe John made on the cautious optimism around the healthcare renewal season?

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

No, I think from a long-term strategic standpoint, don't really see any changes from what we've seen for the last, honestly, couple of decades, which is kind of the underlying environment of increasing complexity for small employers, and even in this case mid-sized employers. I think continues to be a reality. I think the war for talent, I think, just add to that dimension of small and mid-sized companies now, on top of having to deal with regulation and complexity, and so forth. And it happens in every administration.

We've seen now this administration obviously has a different view of regulation, but there's still a lot of activity, like the recent announcement around changes in overtime regulations that had been previously announced under the Obama administration. So, the world continues to become difficult and complex for small and mid-sized employers. And then on top of that, very low unemployment rates create a real competitive issue for people to find talent. So all those things, I think, are I think fuel for kind of the long-term strategic growth of the PEO -- the PEO model.

So there's really nothing that I see that's changed that potential net trajectory. There is still relatively low penetration, whether it's at the ADP client base level or even out in the marketplace. The number of clients on PEOs relative to the available market is still relatively small. There's obviously noise along the way. As John mentioned, we have a healthcare renewal in the fourth quarter, but we have that every year. We have year-end, which tends to create a lot of activity as well. By that, I mean, January 1, which that's now behind us this year, but that occurs every year. You have other kind of events that happen along the way like ECA was an event that I think had an impact, first positive and then slightly negative afterwards in its wake. So, there are things that will create ups and downs, but overall we're still very bullish on that business in terms of long-term outlook.

And on the short-term, Jim, you were following up on the specifics of the healthcare renewal, I think. We don't see anything specifically positive or negative on this healthcare renewals, so it's kind of -- that always changes by carrier as we receive the proposals. But it feels like largely in line with historic trends that we have seen.

James Schneider -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

That's helpful. Thank you. And then as we think about the kind of go forward impact of the book of business, you're taking on. Can you maybe help us a little bit as we model a forward model in terms of, for example, over the next quarter or by the end of June, if you size the rough number of clients, you expect to be able to convert, what percentage of those clients you think you'll be able to sign up of the total by the end of June?

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

I think, the easiest way, Jim, to think about it is, we increased our guidance, and you got basically the incremental number from Carlos today. If you translate those new business bookings, they will be kind of their larger and smaller clients. We anticipate an almost full run rate of revenues for next year. So, just translate the incremental new business bookings into ES, they're all ES clients, and then they will become revenues.

James Schneider -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Helpful. Thank you.

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

Like 1% of new business bookings growth question reminds me is approximately $15 million of revenue. So that gives you a good -- I think that gives you a fair sizing of the opportunity.

James Schneider -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Thanks.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question will come from the line of Ramsey El-Assal with Barclays. Your line is now open.

Ramsey El-Assal -- Barclays Investment -- Analyst

Hi. Thanks for taking my question. I wanted to ask you about the pricing environment. I think, you mentioned last quarter, it did firmed up a bit, and I just was wondering if you could update us on any pricing trends that you're seeing more recently maybe end of the year and selling season?

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

In my advanced age, I'm old (ph). Yes, you're right. We thought we -- by pricing I mean we thought we said that our promotions were down year-over-year, and I think that was a sign of maybe things firming up. I would say that the information this quarter is not consistent with that. So I think if you look at the full year now for three quarters, probably like around the same place we were in the previous year, so again that's why sometimes it's better to not say much, because it look like maybe there were some kind of trend there, but I would say there's really no -- there's no trend.

I think that we don't see any major, unless John has or Christian has any other observations. But I think because we get so much information and so much data to prepare for these calls. Sometimes we get too much into the weeds, and so there were some signs of the use of less promotions in the prior -- in the first two quarters of the year, and I think now when you look at it over the course of nine months -- and by the way, our heavy selling season is the third quarter, in one of our businesses where we've signed up a lot of the clients as of the beginning of the year. So, I'd say, there is really probably nothing meaningful to report. Is that fair?

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

I think that's fair. Yes.

Ramsey El-Assal -- Barclays Investment -- Analyst

Okay. Great.

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

We're not -- for whatever that's real.

Ramsey El-Assal -- Barclays Investment -- Analyst

Great, terrific. On just a broader macro question, are you seeing any changes, any updates on the broader macro environment, maybe sort of a slice there kind of U.S. versus non-U.S. business, maybe particularly Europe, is there any interesting call outs there to report or is it just sort of you still see a pretty smooth macro environment sort of unfolding?

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

Yes. So, I felt -- I think it was a couple of quarters ago, where I got a question, I gave a very short answer about not seeing anything going wrong in the economy, and then it looked like I was -- have egg on my face in December and January, but maybe we're now somewhat indicated in terms of data has been consistently showing -- I think, the economy continuing to move along at a very good pace. And so, I think, today we -- our National Employment Report came out. You see our pays per control number and you see government GDP reports a few days ago, and I think all of those are consistent with, I think, an economy that's performing quite well.

And so, I would say, we will stick to the same -- I won't be quite as cavalier anymore about making economic predictions, but we don't see any real change in the current trend. Obviously, John and I have been paying this for a couple of years, and I think we've so far been proven wrong that with unemployment low as it is, the growth in the number of -- amount of employment at some point should slow, but it appears that there is enough people on the sidelines, just based on the labor participation rate number that people are still being drawn into the workforce.

The one thing that we will point out as we've seen like the government and others, some wage pressure which actually is good for us. We kind of like wage pressure not necessarily because of the pressure puts on our cost internally, but as far our float business benefits some a little bit from higher wage inflation obviously, because it increases our balances. It's not a meaningful number given how much inflation we've had, but the trend has been up for multiple quarters now. But I think it's all -- it seems like the economy is performing very well. We look at all the other indicators that everyone else looks at like NFIB optimism, leading indicators, all the other Michigan leading indicators, all those other things, I think, look very strong.

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

And if I add two seconds on our European business, the last three months in Europe actually were also stronger relative to our pays per control metrics. I wouldn't over read it, but it was a very solid European quarter also.

Ramsey El-Assal -- Barclays Investment -- Analyst

Great. Thanks so much.

Operator

Thank you. And our next question will come from the line of Lisa Ellis with MoffetNathanson. Your line is now open.

Lisa Ellis -- MoffetNathanson -- Analyst

Hi. Good morning, guys, and welcome to Kathleen. I wanted to ask just a broader question about the competitive dynamics in ADP's performance in the mid and upmarket. You've called out continued strength in RUN and international as drivers of growth. Those have been bright spots for ADP for a long time. Can you just give us an update? I think, we are now well over a year past the completion of the Workforce Now migrations, are you back to positive client growth in the mid-market? And then also what's just the update on like the new payroll engine and sort of the long-term strategy to improve your competitive position in the upper end? Thanks.

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

So when we made the comment about the strength coming from small business and international, it was actually multinationals what we said in our prepared remarks. We were referring to revenue, if you recall, which is accurate and actually makes sense. But on our bookings, I think we also said that we had broad-based new business bookings performance that led to the 10% growth. And so by broad-base, we would include the mid market in the upmarket. So we've gotten some help from the decision to deploy and sell more aggressively Workforce Now in the lower end of the national accounts market where -- for clients that are in kind of the less complex range, if you will, and smaller size, so call it 1,000 to 5,000 employees and less complex, so that's given a little bit of a boost to our upmarket sales.

I think in the mid-market, when you look at our mid-market business kind of across categories because we have our traditional payroll business, but we also have a fairly fast growing mid-market business within our PEO because our PEO sells also in mid-market clients. So some of those incentives that we talked about a couple of quarters ago have started to kind of have the desired impact, and we've had a little bit of a rebound in the growth of our mid-market PEO business.

We also have a mid-market outsourcing business that doesn't have co-employment, we've had it for many years, but that's also a fast growing business. As well as within the HRO segment, when we talk about the strategic pillars, so it's kind of a sister business, if you will, to the PEO. So when you add all those together, I think we feel pretty good about our performance in the mid-market. I think our bookings were very good in the third quarter in the upmarket.

And I think when you add in GlobalView and some of our other solutions in the upmarket like stand-alone tax, like we feel OK, about -- as you know, we've been very transparent. This is the place where we have work to do, and we still think we have some work to do in the very -- in upmarket domestic business. And our new platform, we affectionately refer to as Lifion, I think is intended to help boost that. And I think the combination of Lifion Workforce Now and Vantage, I think really are positioning us for a much stronger position in the future than what we've had over the last couple of years.

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

If I add to this, we have seen continued improvement in our client satisfaction and retention, in particular, in the mid-market, we're seeing the benefit of being on one platform, clients staying longer, and now for many quarters in a row, mid-market retention has really improved overall. And so, the mid-market, it feels to me, the mid-market compound of all these factors together is a much stronger position than was just a few quarters ago.

Lisa Ellis -- MoffetNathanson -- Analyst

Terrific. And then maybe my follow-up, you would call out, you're now lapping cash card and work market. Can you help a little bit with where they're just starting to plug into your business and how big contributors they are today? Thank you.

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

I think that, again, unfortunately for -- well, first kind of how you look at it for ADP, Global Cash Card had certainly a measurable impact, just because of the size. And I think we disclosed the size of that acquisition, and I think the revenue impact. But generally speaking, some of these acquisitions tend to have long-term strategic value. I think Celergo which you didn't mention, but it's another one that I would bring up. We expect that to really have a big impact on our multinational business in the future, but it's just -- because of the size of ADP at $14 billion, these acquisitions just are more strategic rather than kind of short-term financial impact plays.

On the Global Cash Card side, that's a place where we're very I think bullish in terms of the future of using the pay card, I think, as an avenue for growth because we have a very large installed base that we think will fit -- that solution will fit well for, and I think it's a -- there is demand out in the marketplace for it.

I think WorkMarket as we've said, there is a huge market, if not the size, close to the size of kind of our traditional ADP W2 business for independent contractors, but it's a very, very small impact in the current fiscal year and probably for the next couple of fiscal years. And so how we are -- what we're doing with these products, as an example, in the case of WorkMarket, we're building WorkMarket into Lifion. And so you will have a platform available to clients in the upmarket that will allow them to manage their entire workforce, their W2 employees, as well as their independent contractors, they have full visibility of their entire workforce. So, that was -- that's an important, I think, move that we've made to use the intellectual property and leverage that intellectual property.

And then in terms of how we're building the Cash Card businesses in terms -- into the future, is I think we've kind of signaled that we think we have an opportunity to create a larger relationship with the worker, and so this concept of B2B2C, I think, is something that Global Cash Card, and wisely specifically gives us, I think, an entree into. And so, again, that's something that it's three years, five years, 10 years down the road, but we're very excited about it.

Lisa Ellis -- MoffetNathanson -- Analyst

Terrific. Excellent. Thanks, Carlos. Thanks, John.

Operator

Thank you. And our next question will come from the line of Tien-tsin Huang with JP Morgan. Your line is now open.

Tien-tsin Huang -- JP Morgan -- Analyst

Thanks. Just one question on margins, because you're running ahead with the raised guidance. I'm curious if this changes your thinking on margins, or investments in relation to your longer term targets on margin expansion?

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

So, I think, we traditionally provide guidance in August, and so I think that would be a tradition we will stick to. I think, we're in the middle of our operating plan season here and that will obviously give us a little bit more visibility into '20, into fiscal year '20 which will then gear in August. We gave three-year guidance, and I think our intention wasn't to update it quarterly. And I think when we get to, I think, the guidance for fiscal year '20, we'll see I think what that implies in terms of guidance.

Tien-tsin Huang -- JP Morgan -- Analyst

Got it. So we will stay tuned for that. John, all the best to you, and Kathleen, look forward to working with you.

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Kathleen Winters -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, likewise.

Operator

Thank you. And our next question will come from Ashwin Shirvaikar with Citi. Your line is now open.

Ashwin Shirvaikar -- Citi Investment Research -- Analyst

Thanks. Good morning, folks. Kathleen, welcome. John, it was a pleasure working with you. All the best. I guess my first question is in both ES and PEO, you seem to have clarity -- you seem to be trending more to the lower end of our revenue expectations. You did well on margins. I want to ask how you're now taking of sort of the revenue growth versus margin growth trade off? All these margin initiatives have been successful. But is it leading you too much in one direction versus the other, and specifically what do you need to do to get up to your 7% to 9% mid-term growth rate?

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

So, I mentioned two things. First on Employer Services, I think, we tried to be clear that I think we have a little bit of additional FX pressure, which is obviously something that we don't have control over and we don't factor in, in the beginning of the year. So I think that's -- at least for now, that's some of it because you would see from our third quarter bookings that we feel pretty good about the long-term future trajectory from a revenue growth standpoint.

On the PEO, I think, we've cautioned, I think, over many years and even when we did our Investor Day, that a very large part of our guidance around PEO revenues and overall EP revenues is the growth of pass-throughs, which has no impact on dollars of profit. It has an impact on margin because the slower those pass-throughs grow, they actually help us with our margin percent objectives. But the faster they grow, the more they hurt that margin.

And so we've cautioned and encouraged people to not get too caught up if the source of weakness is pass-through revenues. That's really not a value creating revenue stream for us, it's part of the way we -- the business model and it's part of the way we bill our clients. But I would say that, the tone you should be hearing from us on the PEO is actually quite positive, has been positive since the first -- since the first quarter, and was positive even entering into the first quarter. And the only thing that changed from six months before that was the pace of pass-through growth, which slowed in a meaningful enough way that it put pressure on the top line revenue growth for the PEO. But I would encourage you to stay focused on kind of the revenues excluding pass-throughs in Worksite Employees and the other metrics which we feel are actually strong, if not ahead of where we expected them to be.

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

And maybe I'll add a more tactical comment because this quarter really had an usual revenue growth outcome. And just reminding everybody that much of that in the PEO, of course, we explained with the timing of our SUI revenue collection and a couple of other one-time moving items also. And we had also a timing effect of revenue relative to processing days in the second quarter that moved into the second quarter on the ES side.

So, once you adjust for all of that actually the organic revenue growth for the company is fairly close to where we wanted to be. And if you look on a year-over-year comparison, I think, we remain optimistic about an acceleration of our organic revenue growth in particular in the ES segment that should really drive overall long-term success of the company. And as you know, we have built-in scale on our business model, a growing company and it shows competitiveness. So there is a strong commitment to drive the revenue growth, as we had indicated going forward.

Ashwin Shirvaikar -- Citi Investment Research -- Analyst

Got it. I did want to go back to the transaction that you announced with what, I think, is a large bank distribution channel. Without that, I believe, you said you'd be at the lower end of the bookings range. Is there something going on there with regards to competition, prior year comps, pricing, something we should be aware of that is temporary affecting that bookings performance, and typically when you buy these sorts of portfolio, I'd imagine they don't quite have the richer set of portfolio services you have, so is that an opportunity?

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

Yes. The last part for your question is there's definitely an opportunity there because you're right our portfolio is a little bit -- little bit broader. So we're very bullish and very optimistic on the transaction. Just to clarify, we didn't say that we would be at the low end, I think we said we would be at least at the lower end. And so, we feel, based on the third quarter bookings performance, based on momentum, we feel pretty good about our situation around new business bookings. So maybe we weren't strong enough in conveying that, but I think our sales force is executing quite well.

I just want to clarify also, it may not have come through, that I've been working on this deal for personally for more than...

Ashwin Shirvaikar -- Citi Investment Research -- Analyst

2007, yes.

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

(inaudible) And I think the company is working on it before. So we didn't just run out and try to make an acquisition to make the quarter, or to get our bookings number up for the fourth quarter. I wish it were that easy because we tried many, many times to make this happen over the course of a decade, and this happens to when it occurred. And we would have taken it any time, any day, because it's good for our shareholders and it is good for our -- it's good for our business, and we're very -- very pleased that we have it. But now we have no concerns about anything happening in the macro environment, on the pricing front, or otherwise to make us feel less positive about our sales force, our distribution in our new business bookings.

Ashwin Shirvaikar -- Citi Investment Research -- Analyst

Got it. Thanks.

Operator

Thank you. And our next question will come from the line of James Berkley with Wolfe Research. Your line is now open.

James Berkley -- Wolfe Research -- Analyst

Thanks, and congratulations, John and Kathleen. Just quick follow-up on the booking side. I'm obviously great seeing the guidance being raised. Just how big was the days of selling impact, since there was no discounting? Just trying to understand the acceleration. I know like holiday sales and January, a lot of people struggled across a lot of different industries there. But just trying to get a feel for the current trends and how sustainable that is, excluding the impact of the transaction you're expecting in the next quarter? Thanks.

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

If I remember correctly, it would be the same impact that we talked about, that impacted the second quarter because we just -- we ended up getting, I think it was two days of less selling in the second quarter, which then we got in the third quarter, and we saw it, if you remember the conference call that we had, we already had those two days. So we knew we could see that our -- our sales in the first couple of weeks of this quarter had kind of rebounded. And I think it was a few percentage points. It I'm not mistaken, I think it was 2 percentage points to 3 percentage points of impact on the second quarter, which means we probably got a little bit of benefit to that extent in the third quarter.

And this timing event overall didn't really impact our full year outlook for the -- for new business bookings. So it was really neutral and everything we thought we lost was made up as precise as you can be, and these things was made up in January. I think, it's fair to say that if you take all the noise out of calendar and so forth that we feel like we're right where we thought we would be in terms of bookings, in terms of where our plans were and where our objectives were?

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

James, I would just remind you, like we talked a little bit about FX, right. And we also talked about interest income being a little bit weak. So if you're talking about in the context of the strength of revenue growth just keep those two items in mind.

James Berkley -- Wolfe Research -- Analyst

Okay, great. Thanks a lot. I appreciate the color.

Operator

Thank you. And we have time for one last question. So, our last question will come from the line of Kevin McVeigh with Credit Suisse. Your line is now open.

Kevin McVeigh -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Great, thanks. Is there any -- and congratulations again on both John and Kathleen. I think about the impact of the retention across, so the 25 basis points, 50 basis points of that, how much has that come kind of from down market versus mid versus up as we're thinking about the year overall?

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

Well, obviously we don't provide retention by business unit, but maybe we can give you some. I think, we already gave you some color, some sense of that. I think John talked about some really good improvements in our mid-market, in our mid-market business. We do have obviously a number of other businesses besides kind of the general categories of small, medium and large. Like for example, in a down market, we have a retirement services business, we have an insurance business that really acts as an agency in addition to the traditional payroll business. We talked about the outsourcing businesses that we have that are in Employer Services, but are not part of the PEO. So these kind of more comprehensive solutions, if you will, that those are -- those businesses have gotten to be a meaningful size, as well we have a screening and selection business, we have an RPO business. So we have a lot of moving parts.

And I think for us to get improvements in retention, we have to have broad-based improvements in client satisfaction, in NPS scores and execution. It's just there's no way around it. So you have to assume that by the way we've for the last -- as long as ADP's been around, we have some people that are performing better any particular quarter or any particular year, and others that are performing less well. But when you see this kind of trend you have to assume that the overall company is performing better and executing well, which is what is happening.

Kevin McVeigh -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

That's super helpful. And then just on the acquisition, are the clients mostly kind of down, mid -- enterprise or across the board, and historically has it been kind of more of a service or are they already on the cloud or you'd shift them to the cloud as you're kind of bringing them in?

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

It's small and mid, which is traditionally the way these -- these acquisitions are typically in that space. It's -- and it's technically not an acquisition just to be clear. And if you remember, the right to convert the clients on to our platforms from their previous -- from their previous provider. So these are typically, I don't think we've ever been able to do -- who knows, but we've never been able to do this with kind of enterprise sized client. I guess this is technically possible just to buy the right to convert. But this typically happens with mid -- with small and mid-sized clients. The majority of the clients would be small clients and some mid-sized clients.

Kevin McVeigh -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

Super. Thank you.

Operator

This concludes our question-and-answer portion for today. I am pleased to hand the program over to Carlos Rodriguez for closing remarks.

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

Thank you. So, you can tell, I think, from our comments, we're really pleased with the rebound in our bookings. We're happy with this transaction that we consummated in late March. I think, we have good momentum. I think, our financial performance has been strong. But I also want to kind of call out the comment in the question about retention, we really wouldn't be able to perform on a long-term basis, as well as we're performing if we weren't really delivering strong client satisfaction and better products.

So, I want to also complement our associates and our organization on staying focused on NPS scores, on client satisfaction and on building stronger products, because the performance of the financial side doesn't come without those factors. And all what we are doing there, we're trying to transform our business, and I think become more efficient. So there's a lot of effort and a lot of work, and I appreciate all of that everyone is doing.

Last thing, I just want to mention is, obviously very excited about having Kathleen here with us, and everyone will get to know her, but it's a bittersweet moment here with Jan leaving. As always, even the way he handled this transition was a total class act. So we've been partners here for a long time prior to us being either CEO or CFO, we've been through a lot together. We've done a lot. And I just want to thank Jan one more time for everything he has done, not just for our shareholders and for all of you who are here on the call, but he also did a lot for our clients, our associates, and he did quite a bit for his community as well. So, Jan, I thank you again, and I declare you not only Iron Man athlete, but Iron Man CFO.

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

Thanks for everything, Jan. Good luck to you.

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

And thank you today for your attention. Appreciate it.

Operator

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for your participation on today's conference. This does conclude the program, and we may all disconnect. Everybody have a wonderful day.

Duration: 65 minutes

Call participants:

Christian Greyenbuhl -- Vice President, Investor Relations

Carlos Rodriguez -- President & Chief Executive Officer

Jan Siegmund -- Corporate Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

Kathleen Winters -- Chief Financial Officer

Mark Marcon -- Robert W. Baird -- Analyst

Jason Kupferberg -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

James Schneider -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Ramsey El-Assal -- Barclays Investment -- Analyst

Lisa Ellis -- MoffetNathanson -- Analyst

Tien-tsin Huang -- JP Morgan -- Analyst

Ashwin Shirvaikar -- Citi Investment Research -- Analyst

James Berkley -- Wolfe Research -- Analyst

Kevin McVeigh -- Credit Suisse -- Analyst

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