Logo of jester cap with thought bubble.

Image source: The Motley Fool.

Corning (NYSE:GLW)
Q2 2020 Earnings Call
Jul 28, 2020, 8:30 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:


Operator

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for standing by, and welcome to the Corning Incorporated second-quarter 2020 earnings conference call. [Operator instructions] I would now like to hand the conference to your speaker today, Ann Nicholson, vice president of investor relations. Please go ahead, ma'am.

Ann Nicholson -- Vice President of Investor Relations

Thank you, Joelle, and good morning. Welcome to Corning's second-quarter 2020 earnings call. With me today are Wendell Weeks, chairman and chief executive officer; Tony Tripeny, executive vice president and chief financial officer; and Jeff Evenson, executive vice president and chief strategy officer. I'd like to remind you that today's remarks contain forward-looking statements that fall within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.

Those statements involve risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially. These factors are detailed in the company's financial reports. You should also note that we will be discussing our consolidated results using core performance measures, unless we specifically indicate our comments relate to GAAP data. Our core performance measures are non-GAAP measures used by management to analyze the business.

Reconciliation of core results to the comparable GAAP value can be found in the Investor Relations section of our website at corning.com. You may also access core results on our website with downloadable financials in the interactive analyst center. Supporting slides are being shown live on our webcast. We encourage you to follow along, and they're also available on our website for downloading.

Now I'll turn the call over to Wendell.

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Ann, and good morning, everyone. This morning, we reported second-quarter 2020 results. Sales were $2.6 billion. Net income was $218 million.

EPS was $0.25, and free cash flow was $285 million. All increased sequentially. I have two primary observations on the quarter. First, we're effectively adjusting to this period of uncertainty with decisive action and operational execution.

We're generating positive cash flow and maintaining a strong balance sheet. Second, even in these uncertain times, our strategy to deliver for our customers and outperform our markets is working. We're continuing to lead in the capabilities that make Corning distinctive. In fact, we advanced multiple growth initiatives during the quarter.

Let's consider the first observation in more detail. In the second quarter, we completed adjustments to our operating plan and continued to execute across the board by delivering operational improvements that will generate significant cost savings through 2021. We delivered sequential growth in sales, EPS and free cash flow. We also completed the vast majority of our anticipated restructuring, including the reprioritization of R&D programs.

We believe we're continuing to position Corning for strong long-term growth and improved profitability. Turning to my second observation. Our long-term strategy is sound, and our growth drivers are intact. As I've said before, we're not just counting on everybody buying more stuff, we're putting more Corning into the products that people already buy.

This provides a mechanism for us to outperform our end markets, even in challenging environments. The relevance of our focused and cohesive portfolio remains strong and is actually increasing. Some of the secular trends benefiting us could accelerate as consumer lifestyles continue to adapt in a world with social distancing and as healthcare companies advance solutions to end the pandemic. There is a need for expanded network capacity and ubiquitous displays as people spend more time online.

Safe, widespread delivery of vaccines are among society's top priorities, and reduced fine particulate pollution appears to be helpful for reducing infection rates. All these needs fall directly within Corning's mission of improving lives through innovation, and we are well-positioned to contribute. The progress we've made and the leadership position we leveraged across our markets in the second quarter speaks for itself. Let's take a closer look.

In life sciences, we're mobilizing our capabilities to combat the virus wherever we can. Glass packaging is critical to the COVID-19 vaccine effort, and it is currently in short supply. Our Valor Glass innovation helps enable faster filling line speeds and increase patient safety. Valor Glass was selected by the U.S.

Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Defense to accelerate delivery of COVID-19 vaccines, and Corning was awarded $204 million in funding to expand Valor manufacturing capacity. Three leading COVID-19 vaccine producers have entered supply agreements for Valor Glass, and we're also working with several other potential customers to capture additional opportunities. Additionally, we announced a long-term supply agreement with Pfizer to provide Valor Glass for currently marketed drugs in their portfolio. Our life sciences segment entered several long-term agreements with major customers for COVID-19 molecular diagnostic testing and antibody detection kits in quarter two.

We're seeing strong demand for these products currently, and we expect to accelerate shipments further in the second half. In mobile consumer electronics, our specialty materials segment delivered 13% year-over-year sales growth, while the smartphone market declined year over year. Our performance was driven by strong demand for premium products, and we announced two exciting milestones. Gorilla Glass has now been used on more than 8 billion devices worldwide, and we maintained our industry leadership with the launch of Gorilla Glass Victus.

This is the toughest Gorilla Glass yet and features significantly better drop and scratch performance than any other Gorilla Glass or competitive glass from other manufacturers. Samsung will be the first customer to adopt Gorilla Glass Victus in the near future. In automotive, our environmental technology segment outperformed in a weak market. Strong adoption of our gasoline particulate filters continued, driving their sales growth to more than 20% year over year.

Turning to optical communications. Corning grew sales 12% sequentially driven by carrier network projects. We announced a collaboration with EnerSys to speed 5G deployment by simplifying the delivery of fiber and electrical power to small-cell wireless sites. We also announced that we're working with Qualcomm Technologies to deliver indoor networks that are 5G ready, easy to install and affordable.

The Corning systems are expected to be among the first designed to deliver 5G and our capability over millimeter-wave spectrum in the indoor segment. This includes enterprises, such as offices, university campuses, hospitals, hotels, retail outlets and more. Our collaboration will enable a small footprint and low-power consumption platform for true high-bandwidth 5G for in-building networks. Customer deployment will begin in the fall.

In display, Corning generated consistent sequential net income as customer demand remained steady, and large screen TV sales continued to drive demand, supporting the opening of our Gen 10.5 facilities. Across our markets, you can see that we're successfully advancing our long-term growth initiatives. Additionally, near-term market conditions have improved. Auto factories are resuming operations in North America and Europe, and auto sales in China have returned to pre-pandemic levels.

Telecommunications service providers and data center operators have resumed sending their technicians into the field, and they're rethinking their network needs to address greater demand for their services. Life science labs are slowly reopening. We also expect television demand to remain resilient as in-home entertainment is more important than ever, and the demand for computing devices will be boosted by work and learn from home. So we're seeing some encouraging developments across our industries.

On the other hand, disruptive forces from the pandemic, the civil unrest, to a worldwide recession and geopolitical struggles all remain in play, and they create uncertainty. We are united as a company to remain vigilant and adapt appropriately. We're rising to the challenge. I'll now turn the call over to Tony, so he can give you some more detail on our quarter and our near-term outlook.

Tony Tripeny -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Wendell, and good morning. We came into this economic downturn with a balance sheet built for times like these, and we took actions during the quarter to ensure we have the financial resources needed for the duration. We generated $285 million in free cash flow, exited the quarter with $2.2 billion in cash and are on track to generate positive free cash flow for the year. Our financial position is strong.

We are becoming more efficient, and we have the capacity in place to meet expected growth with minimal investment. We expect improved profitability and return on invested capital as we grow sales. As the quarter progressed, demand and visibility improved. We maintained our leadership across all of our market access platforms.

As a result, we expect to grow sales and profits in the third quarter. As we said on our first-quarter call, we've made aggressive adjustments to align our cost and operating plan with the lower anticipated sales. These actions were essentially completed in the second quarter and fall into four broad categories: reducing production levels across most of our businesses, adjusting operating expenses with the majority of the savings to be realized in the second half, modifying inventory plans, and reducing capital expenditures. As a result, we expect $200 million in annualized cash savings.

We reduced inventory by $120 million in the second quarter, and we reduced our capex by half versus Q1 to $288 million. We expect Q3 and Q4 capex to be consistent with the second quarter. We had strong operational performance with sequential improvement in sales, net income, EPS and free cash flow. Second-quarter sales were $2.6 billion, up 2% quarter over quarter.

Net income was $218 million, up 23% quarter over quarter. And EPS was $0.25, up 25% sequentially, and free cash flow was $285 million. Now before I get into further details of our performance and results, I want to note that the largest difference between our GAAP and core results stemmed from restructuring charges of $254 million, which was primarily noncash and included the reassessment and reprioritization of R&D programs. Other differences between our GAAP and core results come from a noncash mark-to-market adjustment for our currency hedge contracts.

With respect to mark-to-market adjustments, GAAP accounting requires earning translations, hedge contracts and foreign debt settling in future periods to be mark-to-market and recorded at current value at the end of each quarter, even though those contracts will not be settled in the current quarter. To be clear, this mark-to-market accounting has no impact on our cash flow. Our currency hedges protect us economically from foreign exchange rate fluctuations and provide higher certainty for our earnings and cash flow, our ability to invest for growth and our future shareholder distributions. Our non-GAAP or core results provide additional transparency into operations by using a constant currency rate aligned with the economics of our underlying transactions, so we're very pleased with our hedging program and the economic certainty it provides.

We've received $1.7 billion in cash under our hedge contracts since their inception more than five years ago. Now let's review the business segments. In display technologies, second-quarter sales were $753 million, and net income was $152 million, both consistent with the first quarter. The display glass volume grew by a low single-digit percentage sequentially as our Gen 10.5 customers bought more glass.

Sequential price declines were moderate and as expected. As Wendell said, we expect that television demand will remain resilient as in-home entertainment is more important than ever and that demand for IT products will be boosted by work and stay-at-home trends. In the second quarter, worldwide TV sell-through units in Q2 increased slightly year over year, better than Q1 and better than the industry anticipated. Additionally, demand for notebook PCs was strong in the second quarter.

Preliminary retail sell-through data for June and July indicate that demand recovery in China has held and that demand in North America and Europe remains robust, while emerging regions remain weak. While uncertainty exists around retail demand in the back half of the year, we remain confident that TV screen size will continue to grow in 2020 and beyond. TVs 65 inch or larger grew almost 40% and year over year in the first half, and we are well-positioned to capture the majority of that growth with Gen 10.5, which is the most efficient gen size for large TV manufacturing. We continue to expect display pricing to decline by a mid-single-digit percentage in 2020.

We believe that three factors drive a favorable glass pricing environment. First, we expect glass supply to continue to be balanced to demand. For Corning, we are aligning our capacity with demand. We are also pacing our Gen 10.5 capital projects to align with panel makers' schedules.

Second, our competitors continue to face profitability challenges at current pricing levels. And third, display glass manufacturing requires periodic investments in existing capacity to maintain operations. Glass prices must support acceptable returns on those investments. In optical communications, second quarter-sales grew 12% sequentially to $887 million as major carriers increased spending on cable deployments and access network projects.

Net income grew by $52 million to $81 million on the higher volume and actions taken to align cost and capacity. The year-over-year decline in sales was consistent with the passive optical market decline. We maintain our view that the long-term trend in optical is strongly positive. Bandwidth demand has accelerated during the pandemic, consuming network headroom capacity.

Evidence of that demand includes AT&T's report that WiFi calling increased 100%, Verizon's report that VPN connections are up 72% over pre-COVID levels, and Zoom surpassing 300 million users from 10 million in December. We expect carriers to expand capacity to meet growing bandwidth in the future, but the current environment makes timing uncertain. While network operators remain committed to their original capital plans for 2020, deployments are constrained by pandemic-related labor and site access constraints. We expect these factors to continue in the third quarter.

Environmental technologies faced a challenging market. During the quarter, OEMs temporarily halted production in both the automotive and diesel markets. To mitigate the impact, we swiftly adjusted our operations to pace with customer demand and reduce costs. Environmental technologies second-quarter sales were $226 million, and profitability was impacted by lower sales and production volumes.

Our auto sales were down 31% year over year, beating the global auto production decline of 45% year over year through continued adoption of gasoline particulate filters. The good news is that by the end of the quarter, auto sales in China returned to pre-lockdown levels, while North America and Europe OEMs began ramping production. In diesel, the anticipated cyclical downturn in North America heavy-duty truck market was made worse by shutdowns with vehicle production dropping 73% year over year. Overall, we remain confident in our content and innovation-driven strategy in environmental and expect to return to growth as markets improve through the second half and into next year.

Specialty materials sales were $417 million in the second quarter, up 13% year over year and in sharp contrast to the smartphone market, which declined year over year. Net income was $90 million, up 34% year over year. Sales growth was driven by three factors. First, premium glass demand increased in support of second-half customer launches.

Second, work and study-from-home trends drove growth in our products for tablets and laptops. And third, the demand for advanced chips drove sales for our semiconductor equipment products. Looking ahead, we expect our outperformance relative to the 2020 mobile consumer electronics market to come from further adoption of our innovations. In Life sciences, second-quarter sales declined 7% year over year to $243 million.

Net income was $31 million, down $9 million versus last year on the lower sales volume. The business was impacted by the prolonged closure of nonessential laboratories, such as university research labs, particularly in the North American market. The impact has been somewhat offset by increased demand for consumables used in COVID-19 testing applications. Life science lab reopenings picked up in late May, and lab utilization has been steadily increasing since then.

Going forward, we are confident in the opportunities ahead for life sciences and Valor, especially as we prepare for upcoming vaccine demand. Equity earnings were positively impacted in the second quarter as our Hemlock JV settled a contract with a solar customer. Going forward, Hemlock will largely sell products in the semiconductor industry. Hemlock's leadership position is backed by attractive long-term, take-or-pay customer contracts with upfront payments.

This creates stable revenue and profits and strong cash flow generation. Let's move to the balance sheet and our commitment to strong financial stewardship. We generated $285 million of free cash flow, a significant increase from the first quarter. We were at $2.2 billion of cash, and we have a debt structure that is conservative by design and relatively unique.

Our balance sheet is built for times like these. Today, our average debt maturity is about 25 years, the longest in the S&P 500. Over the next 18 months, we have under $70 million coming due. Less than half of our total debt is due within the next 20 years.

And during this time, there is no single year with debt repayments over $500 million. Investors often evaluate credit and financial health based on total debt to EBITDA. For the S&P 500, the average company has a weighted average debt maturity of roughly 10 years, and more than 80% of debt is due within 20 years. Consequently, when investors calculate the debt to EBITDA, they are implicitly focusing mostly on debt due in the next 20 years.

Corning's 20-year debt to EBITDA is 1.2 times, consistent with an A credit rating and illustrative of the conservatism of our balance sheet. We expect to maintain a strong cash position and to maintain our dividend. As I've previously mentioned, we expect to generate positive free cash flow for the year, and we have paused share buybacks and do not expect to add material debt in 2020. So in total, we have a very strong balance sheet, and we have the financial resources needed for the duration of the economic downturn.

To wrap up, we had strong operational performance in the second quarter with sequential improvements in sales, net income, EPS and free cash flow. As the quarter progressed, demand and visibility improved. This improvement has continued throughout July. As a result, we expect to grow sales and profits in the third quarter.

However, we remain aware of the potential impact from the pandemic, the global recession, civil unrest and geopolitical tensions. So how much growth will depend on end market demand and economic activity during August and September? We will keep you updated as we move through the quarter. Stepping back, our underlying growth drivers are intact, and we're successfully navigating this crisis. As we grow sales, we expect improved profitability.

Furthermore, we have the capacity in place to be able to meet the sales growth with minimal investment, which we expect to result in capital efficiency gains, including ROIC improvement. Altogether, this reaffirms our confidence that Corning is positioned to emerge from this crisis stronger than ever. Now I'll turn the call back over to Wendell.

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Tony. During the second quarter, we made great strides in positioning Corning to emerge stronger from the global health crisis and resume growth. Sales, net income, EPS and free cash flow all increased sequentially. Corning advanced multiple initiatives throughout the second quarter, including the launch of Corning Gorilla Glass Victus and continued innovation with 5G industry leaders.

On the COVID-19 front, we continue to seek ways to leverage our deep technology, manufacturing and engineering capabilities to combat the pandemic directly. We were delighted that Valor Glass was selected by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and the Department of Defense to accelerate delivery of COVID-19 vaccines. Overall, our decisive action and operational execution resulted in positive free cash flow and continued leadership in the capabilities that make Corning distinctive.

We're delivering for our customers. We're outperforming our markets, and we're preserving our financial strength. I'll conclude with an additional important development. For nearly 170 years, our company has been dedicated to creating innovations that have a positive impact on the world while conducting business in a way that has positive impact on our people and our communities.

Now we have an opportunity to make additional contributions. We're setting up an office to further build racial and social unity within the walls of Corning and in our communities. Lewis Steverson, our chief legal and administrative officer, will lead this office. With that, let's move to Q&A.

Ann?

Ann Nicholson -- Vice President of Investor Relations

Thanks, Wendell. Operator, we are ready for the first question.

Questions & Answers:


Operator

[Operator instructions] Our first question comes from Samik Chatterjee with JP Morgan. Your line is now open.

Samik Chatterjee -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

Yes. Thank you. Good morning. Thanks for taking my questions.

If I can just start off with display. You've talked about kind of demand being resilient on TV side. But as we're looking at some of the data points from panel makers regarding to a substantial improvement in panel shipments quarter on quarter going to 3Q or something in the magnitude of 20%. So I wanted to get a sense of what you're seeing in terms of -- or hearing in terms of demand from your panel customers and where does inventory stand because I think, last quarter, you were a bit concerned about the inventory level going in.

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Thanks, from an -- Samik, from an overall standpoint, the TV demand has clearly been resilient. The data points that we saw in the second quarter was the fact that these TV units were up on a year-over-year basis. And then by -- that was certainly better than Q1, and it was also better than, well, most people who are expecting as we went into the quarter.

In addition to that, if you look at what happened in the preliminary data in June and July, I mean, that data was also very strong. In China, we didn't see a change in that data, though that demand remained robust. And in North America and Europe, it was strong during the whole quarter, and that continued. So, yes, I -- we think TV demand is resilient, and we also think the supply chain change is perfectly healthy.

I mean, we ended the year in a healthy supply chain situation. Of course, nobody knew exactly what was going to happen in the second quarter. But given what did happen in the second quarter and the way things are going now, we don't see any supply chain issues there.

Samik Chatterjee -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

OK. And if I can just follow up on the cash flow here. So you had a strong free cash flow quarter through the working capital improvement that you're driving. Just help me think about how sustainable those are as you start to kind of go through the recovery in terms of revenue.

How much of that improvement is kind of something you have to get back as you -- on working capital? Just to trying to think about kind of how does this impact your free cash flow conversion in the long run.

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Well, certainly a lot of that was by reducing inventory. We reduced inventory over $100 million during the quarter. And if you recall, over the last 18 months or so, as we thought our sales were going to be more stronger than they actually turned out to be, they actually built up a fair amount of inventory. So we think there's the opportunity to continue to reduce inventory.

And then just from an overall operational standpoint, one of our real focus areas in the company is on inventory management and how to get better at that. So I think that -- at least that is sustainable for at least a couple more quarter. No doubt when we grow again, we'll have to consume working capital. The other thing that was a big improvement during the quarter, of course, was what happened on capital spending.

And as you know, in the first quarter, a lot of that was the expansion capital ramping up on some of our biggest projects, such as Gen 10.5. And although we still have some of that that's going on, we reduced it significantly in Q2, and we'd expect Q3 and Q4 to be at those same levels.

Tony Tripeny -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

I think stepping back and looking at free cash flow conversion. Fundamentally, when we're not in a build cycle, our free cash flow conversion is excellent, and that's where we are right now. So it's less really about the specific programs and specific things we're doing. It's more just since it takes us a couple of three years to build one of our major low-cost factories, there's a cycle where we invest for the future.

And it is that investment that drives down our free cash flow conversion. We're in a period right now where we've gotten ahead of that, so we're in a spot where we're just in a reinvestment stage. And if we work like that, we're going to have really high free cash flow conversion, and you can expect that to continue.

Samik Chatterjee -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

Got it. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Steven Fox with Fox Advisors. Your line is now open.

Steven Fox -- Fox Advisors LLC -- Analyst

Thanks. Good morning. Wendell, I was wondering if you could maybe step back and give us a bigger-picture view on the new optical cycle. You talked about network headroom basically going away, and it sounds like site access is still an issue, but not as big of an issue.

So if you wanted to think about maybe the next four to six quarters versus how you performed in the year or two before the downturn in optical, how do we think about that under the sort of new world we're living in? Thank you.

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Steve, I think that's an excellent question. And to sort of balance up the known versus the unknown and then try to come to a conclusion. On the known side, both our cloud providers, as well as our network service providers, all are experiencing very strong growth, as you heard from Tony and you've heard from me during this call. That strong growth, and they see an opportunity for more revenue production going forward, and they see the fiber-based networks have -- are just lower cost.

And you're starting to see some commentary, especially from the network providers, about how they can combine and merge all the various services on to one high-capacity fiber network and therefore open up lots of avenues toward revenue creation all off one capital investment. So all that is stacking up for sort of powerful forces to put optical communications back in a cycle of growth. On the unknown side, real people have to install these networks. Real people have to show up to put in place these massive cloud-based data centers.

And even though people are resuming putting technicians in the field, it is as -- at a much less rate than what it would be -- what would be needed to support historical build cycles. So we still have the pandemic here, and so that makes actual prediction just quarter to quarter what will happen to be difficult. But I think as you said, Steve, because that's what's behind the question, the fundamentals look really strong. Our market position looks really strong.

We should be entering a growth cycle. Now we just got to see how the world deals with the pandemic.

Steven Fox -- Fox Advisors LLC -- Analyst

That's helpful. Thank you.

Operator

Our next question comes from Asiya Merchant with Citigroup. Your line is now open.

Asiya Merchant -- Citi -- Analyst

Great. Thank you for taking my question, and congratulations on a good quarter. A couple of questions. One, just on optical.

There was commentary that the optical segment performed sort of in line with the passive optical market decline, and Wendell just talked about all the labor constraints, etc. that's going on. How should we think about Corning's always maintained their leadership across their end markets? When do we expect -- or when should we expect Corning to again resume growth that outpaces the broader market? And then I have another follow-up on capacity and margins. Thank you.

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

This year, if we're doing our job, and that's the way we think about it, we should be outpacing the market, and we will get on with that post haste.

Asiya Merchant -- Citi -- Analyst

OK. And then just on margins. If I think about -- obviously, you guys are making some progress here sequentially in the third quarter. That's the commentary.

And typically, 3Q is up 5% or so on the top line and as the top line falls through the margins, etc. There's some investor confusion around how idling capacity should help margins. If somebody can walk us through the dynamics there. Typically, idling capacity would lead to perhaps a hit on margins.

And how should we think about the margin improvements in the back half? Thank you.

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

It -- yours -- Asiya, you're correct. I think when we idle capacity, that does hurt the margins, especially if you're having less production than you're actually selling as you also take down inventory, which is, of course, what we did in Q2 and Q3. On the other side, though, we did a lot of cost-reduction efforts, and that ends up helping margins. And so we ended up in Q2 with margins very similar to what we had in Q1.

On a gross margin level and then on an operating margin level, of course, we did better than that. So as we look forward, the key here is to increase sales. And as we put more sales through our factories and more sales through our opex structure, we'll see expansion in margins.

Asiya Merchant -- Citi -- Analyst

OK. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from George Notter with Jefferies. Your line is now open.

George Notter -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Hi. Thanks a lot. I guess I wanted to ask about just the fundamentals in the display business. I'm thinking more strategically.

There's a lot of moving parts there, of course. You guys are pacing some of your investment in Gen 10.5. You've got pending exits of some of the LCD panel-making facilities in Korea. Certainly, we hear about CBC rumor to be for sale.

I mean, can you just talk about what you're seeing over there and how that kind of plays into your dynamics strategically as you look forward? Thanks.

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks for the question. What you've heard from us in the past really remains. Those fundamental drivers remain in place, which is we have been preparing for a number of years for the ascendancy of the Chinese panel-making infrastructure. And because of the particular way that economy works, that would leave what was the strongest region in terms of production, Korea, at a cost disadvantage.

Once they made the decision not to go to Gen 10.5, that sort of was -- the die was cast. So that's why we have been on our investment cycle in China with three-quarters of the support coming from our customers or the Chinese government in one form or another. So those trends look like they continue to move in our direction. It always happened a little bit faster than we were planning because Korea ended up -- Samsung, specifically, ended up making decisions a little faster than what was their original plan.

So we don't really have all of our Gen 10.5 facilities up to support all that demand yet, and that's what we're working through. CBC, of course, is a strong customer of ours. We would expect our market position to continue to grow as the trends toward China continue and the trends toward our long-term strategic partners continue. Did that answer your question, George?

George Notter -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Very well, yes. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Shannon Cross with Cross Research. Your line is now open.

Shannon Cross -- Cross Research -- Analsyt

Thank you very much. I was just curious, given the vaccine, and obviously, you've got some funding from the government, but just, in general, sort of this push to move manufacturing back to the U.S. then and clearly a significant amount of government dollars that are out there right now. If this has changed really your thought process on time line for Valor to provide meaningful contribution to the business.

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

The simple answer, Shannon, is yes.

Shannon Cross -- Cross Research -- Analsyt

Any idea of the magnitude of the pull-in of time line? Can you help us think about it?

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

We have an excellent idea, yes. We have an excellent idea. We're not disclosing it yet. Here's the challenge really in why we're not giving specific guidance here on Valor is we are putting a significant amount of our effort behind the specific human health need of we have to protect our people and the people around the globe with the vaccine.

So that's where we're aiming our efforts. So sort of any prediction on the specific sales as they evolve would have to involve like what is going to be the success and timing of the vaccine. So what you can see, the way to think about it is we're now accelerating the building of our high-volume manufacturing facility. And we're in the midst of pouring concrete on the floor, too, inside that shell.

We're in the midst of quickly ramping our equipment, and we're doubling the output of our Big Flats, New York facility. So we're going very fast, but so are our customers going very fast. And it's really hard to pick winners and losers. So I still the -- here's the way I think about it financially.

I still don't think, if you're primarily focused on the near term, you should worry much about Valor driving our numbers, right? If you're worried about the long term, this is an excellent sign for us. All the stuff that we bet on, which is you needed U.S.-based manufacturing, that you needed a new pharmaceutical package, that we needed to have more fill-line capacity, and we could do that through our packaging that we needed to make patients safer. All those bets look like they're coming through, but that's really about the long term. It will be a big driver.

Meanwhile, we just want to make you safe, and we want to do our part. Does that make sense, Shannon?

Shannon Cross -- Cross Research -- Analsyt

It does. It does. Can you talk a bit about any competitive moves that you've seen from some of the others out in the industry? Because it seems like you guys are in a really good position, but I'm wondering if you've seen anything pop up recently. And then thank you.

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Well, in this industry, remember, we're an attacker. So historically, we haven't had much of a position in pharmaceutical packaging, and it was only when we saw significant issues with the packaging of today that we developed the Valor innovation and decided we needed to do this to make patients safer. And we needed to bring our capabilities to that fight. So we're really the attacker.

We're just getting started, but I think you're right. I think we're off to a robust-enough start to give our competitors a heck of a wake-up call.

Shannon Cross -- Cross Research -- Analsyt

Great. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. And your next question comes from Tim Long with Barclays. Your line is now open.

Peter Zdebski -- Barclays -- Analyst

Hi. This is Peter Zdebski on for Tim. Congratulations on the quarter. I wanted to ask about the specialty materials outperformance.

Can you help us parse out how significant the impact from work from home and the strong semiconductor equipment demand was relative to smartphone premium products and then maybe how sustainable you see that as we go into 2H?

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

I think from an overall standpoint, each of those items were roughly about a third of the reason for the outperformance. I mean, clearly, what happened in the glass that we sell, both the tablets and the parts that we sell, the notebook computers that have Gorilla Glass on them, was very important to us, and we think it's a good example of the innovations that that we have that caused us to perform better than the underlying market. And then semiconductor performance was also good. I mean, the demand for advanced chipsets really had made a difference there.

And then from a glass standpoint, as we said, we've -- as people get ready to -- as our customers get ready to introduce new products in the back half of the year, they, of course, pull on those products early, and we saw nice demand there, too.

Peter Zdebski -- Barclays -- Analyst

Very helpful. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. And our next question comes from Meta Marshall with Morgan Stanley. Your line is now open.

Meta Marshall -- Morgan Stanley -- Analyst

Great. Thanks. Maybe just a question for me on the optical segment picking up, but I just wonder if you could give a sense of the breadth of that pickup. Is it among kind of one or two major customers? Or are you seeing it kind of across the board? And any commentary on hyper-scale customers in terms of their kind of optical demand?

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

I think from an overall standpoint, we especially saw it in the carrier market. I mean, it's certainly more than one or two customers, but it was very much driven in the carrier market. And when you see our detailed numbers, you'll see that those were the numbers that were up on a sequential basis. In the enterprise market, it was a little bit more mixed.

I think from a data center standpoint, that's where a lot of the labor constraint really showed up, I mean, some data centers less so than others. But I think that's one of the reasons that those sales were down on a quarter-over-quarter basis. But then also, a lot of our enterprise customers are small and medium businesses and also corporate spending. And we saw those areas were clearly impacted by what's happening in the outside world, but there was a broad set, especially in the carrier business.

Meta Marshall -- Morgan Stanley -- Analyst

Got it. And then maybe just on the restructuring charge, and you noted that it was due to reprioritization of some R&D projects. Are there any major projects we could -- should consider discontinued? Or just any commentary there? Thanks.

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. I mean, it was very specifically a stealth project that we hadn't really talked a lot about externally that had originally been initiated by a customer request. And if you recall on our three-four-five strategy, there's the 20% that's outside of three-four-five capabilities where we put our energy and efforts into. And it -- in -- it's one of those projects in that 20% category.

And of course, in this environment, it made sense for us to go back and look at that 20%, and so that's what we did. And we ended up restructuring impairing some of those assets.

Meta Marshall -- Morgan Stanley -- Analyst

Great. Thanks.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Rod Hall with Goldman Sachs. Your line is now open.

Rod Hall -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Yes. Hi. Thank you for the questions. I wanted to start with the lack of guidance or the lower guidance for September and just see if I'm interpreting this correctly.

It seems like your display commentary is positive, and then optical has always been certain. So that leaves us with specialty as the source of increased uncertainty in September. So I wanted to check and see if that's accurate or if that's the right way to interpret this. And then if that is right, what's driving that? Is that product timing? Or is it demand uncertainty? Could you maybe double-click on why the reduced guidance in September? And also, maybe tell us whether you -- and you're going to continue to provide a lower level of guidance like this or is this just a one-off.

And then I have a follow-up.

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

So let's start with your premise, OK? We're not providing lower guidance for September nor are we providing lower guidance for specialty or anything like this. Well, this is -- I think you're overthinking it. Here's the situation. Really, all lights are flashing green in our specific industries and in our performance of our units.

Our financial executives, our operational executives, our strategic executives were all for giving more specific guidance this quarter, OK? I'm the problem. And it's not anything that we're seeing happening specifically in our industries. It's just as I look at the world and I see the pandemic doing what it's doing, I see a very broad global recession. I see civil unrest really across the globe, and I see an awful lot of global tensions in a geopolitical sense.

And it is that macro area that makes me say, "I think there's just too much uncertainty just to count on what we're seeing with our own two eyes." But if we just look at our data, I think we'd be comfortable giving specific guidance, and you would view that guidance as positive. And I'm just more worried about the product uncertainty. Does that make sense to you, Rod? I know I must disappoint you. Does it make sense to you?

Rod Hall -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Yes. No, no, no. Wendell. That's very helpful color.

I just -- that's very helpful. So that answers my question. I appreciate that. And then the second thing, I wanted to drill into the working capital again, Tony.

We -- one of the standouts for us was the debt payable. That came down quite a bit in June and wondering is that a sustainable level? Or do you expect that to bounce back to kind of more historical average levels? Or -- and maybe can you tell us what drove that.

Tony Tripeny -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. No. I think from an overall standpoint, I mean, Wendell's right. I mean, we're in a period of time where our free cash flow conversion is going to be strong because we're not doing the investment capital that we've done in the last several years.

And so on any given line item on the cash flow statement, there's a variety of things that happen on a month-in and month-out standpoint. But we're committed, and we're going to deliver free cash flow for the year, and that's what our focus is. And we are thrilled with our performance in the second quarter, and I think it really helps investors understand our ability to generate that free cash flow.

Rod Hall -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

OK. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Wamsi Mohan with Bank of America. Your line is now open.

Wamsi Mohan -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Yes. Thank you. Wendell, you noted the strong free cash flow margins coming off a build cycle. I think, Tony, you just referenced that, too.

I was wondering how long typically these post-build cycles are, especially given the fact that display has been usually a large source of that? A historical perspective on that would be helpful. And given COVID now, do you think that that is extended for a longer period of time? And I have a follow-up.

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Wamsi, what an excellent question. In a way, what you're asking is when will we be in our next build cycle, which usually is for revenue that's a couple of years out. I think it's really hard to answer that question, Wamsi. If you woke me up in the middle of the night and asked me, I'd say I think we're going to be in a period of really staying within more of the -- a reinvestment repurpose pieces of our wheel, right? And event pieces of our wheel for a time period that, in your normal models, you should be able to count on.

At the same time, what we hope for is that things like our successful help with the vaccine, that this -- the movement toward more optical networks and all those things put us in the long-term spot, those mega trends, our conversion of more value in auto to be back in our build cycle. But I think we'll have plenty of warning, Wamsi. Sorry, I don't have a more specific answer for you.

Wamsi Mohan -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

No, no. And Tony, if I could, the funding that the government is providing for the $204 million that you alluded to, to expand Valor manufacturing capacity, how should we think of that flowing through sort of your statements? Is that a -- does it get reflected in capex right away? Is it all-in capex? Can you give us any color on that?

Tony Tripeny -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. I think the way to think about it, Wamsi, is that as we spend this money, this gets reimbursed. And so it just gets netted out into our statements. I mean, yes, it is for capacity.

So most of it is in capex, but there's also some operating expenses, and it will get reimbursed there, too.

Wamsi Mohan -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

OK. Thank you.

Ann Nicholson -- Vice President of Investor Relations

Thanks, Wamsi. Operator, we've got time for one more question.

Operator

Thank you. And that question comes from Mehdi Hosseini with SIG. Your line is now open.

Mehdi Hosseini -- Susquehanna International Group -- Analyst

Yes. Thank you for taking my question. Two follow-ups. Tony, given all the changes going within the company, an increased focus and at -- in reducing the cost, should I expect your operating margin were to expand from here on even if revenues were to go flat, just for the scenario analysis? And I have a follow-up.

Tony Tripeny -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. I mean, clearly, what we've done in the second quarter is reduce our operating cost, and that will be reflected as we get into Q3 and Q4. From our overall standpoint, as we've talked about before, our real focus areas is to get back to growing our sales and growing our profitability. And when our sales grow, you expect to see improved profitability, too.

Mehdi Hosseini -- Susquehanna International Group -- Analyst

OK. And then, Wendell, I just want to better understand the dynamics impact in the TV industry, all right? Can you remind me of what is the mix of 65-inch TV as a percentage of the overall TV demand or shipment?

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Maybe off the top of my head, I'm drawing a blank on that. That's clearly where all the -- a lot of the growth is going. It was up over -- almost 40% on a year-over-year basis. But when we have our follow-up call, we'll get you the answer to that.

Mehdi Hosseini -- Susquehanna International Group -- Analyst

All right. Thank you.

Ann Nicholson -- Vice President of Investor Relations

Great. Thanks, Mehdi, and thanks, everybody, for joining us today. Before we close out, I just want to let you know that we will attend the Jefferies semiconductor, IT, hardware and communications infrastructure summit on September 2 and Citi's 2020 global technology conference on September 9, and both will be virtual conferences. So once again, thank you.

And Joelle, please disconnect all lines.

Operator

[Operator signoff]

Duration: 63 minutes

Call participants:

Ann Nicholson -- Vice President of Investor Relations

Wendell Weeks -- Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Tony Tripeny -- Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Samik Chatterjee -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

Steven Fox -- Fox Advisors LLC -- Analyst

Asiya Merchant -- Citi -- Analyst

George Notter -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Shannon Cross -- Cross Research -- Analsyt

Peter Zdebski -- Barclays -- Analyst

Meta Marshall -- Morgan Stanley -- Analyst

Rod Hall -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Wamsi Mohan -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Mehdi Hosseini -- Susquehanna International Group -- Analyst

More GLW analysis

All earnings call transcripts