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Edgewell Personal Care Co (NYSE:EPC)
Q3 2020 Earnings Call
Aug 4, 2020, 8:00 a.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:

Operator

Good morning, and welcome to the Edgewell Conference call. [Operator Instructions]. After today's presentation, there will be an opportunity to ask questions. [Operator Instructions]. I would now like to turn the conference over to the speakers. Please go ahead.

Chris Gough -- Vice President, Investor Relations

Good morning, everyone. This is Chris Gough, VP of Investor Relations. Thank you for joining us this morning as we discuss Edgewell's third quarter 2020 earnings and the CREMO acquisition. With me this morning are Rod Little, our President and Chief Executive Officer and Dan Sullivan, our Chief Financial Officer.

Rod will kick off the call and he will hand it over to Dan to discuss our results and we will then transition to Q&A. This call is being recorded and will be available for replay via our website, www.edgewell.com. In addition to the comments we're making on this call, we have posted several supplementary slides to our website that provide additional information on our quarterly results and the acquisition of CREMO.

During the call, we may make statements about our expectations for future plans and performance. This might include future sales, earnings, advertising and promotional spending, product launches, savings and costs related to restructurings, changes to our working capital metrics, currency fluctuations, commodity costs, category value, future plans for return of capital to shareholders and more.

Any such statements are forward-looking statements, which reflect our current views with respect to future events. These statements are based on assumptions and are subject to various risks and uncertainties, including those described under the caption, Risk Factors in our annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended September 30th, 2019, as may be amended in our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q.

These risks may cause our actual results to be materially different from those expressed or implied by our forward-looking statements. We do not assume any obligation to update or revise any of these forward-looking statements to reflect new events or circumstances, except as required by law.

During this call, we will refer to certain non-GAAP financial measures. These non-GAAP measures are not prepared in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. A reconciliation of the non-GAAP financial measures to the most directly comparable GAAP measures are shown in our press release issued earlier today, which is available at the Investor Relations section of our website.

Management believes these non-GAAP measures provide investors with valuable information on the underlying trends of our business. With that, I would like to turn the call over to Rod.

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Chris, and hello everyone. I hope everyone is doing well and staying safe and healthy, as we work our way through this pandemic. Today, I'll begin my remarks by providing an update on the current environment and its impacts on our results. I'll then discuss our third quarter performance and the progress we continue to make on our strategic initiatives, before finishing with the announcement we made earlier this morning about our intent to acquire CREMO.

Dan will then review our financial results in more detail, provide further details on the planned CREMO acquisition, and share some thoughts on how we are approaching the final quarter of our fiscal year. Since we last spoke, the pandemic has spread across the globe with far-reaching impact in the categories in which we compete, and therefore on our business as you saw and our results posted earlier this morning.

COVID-19 had a considerable impact on our sales in our core category -- in our core categories in the quarter. The difficult conditions we saw in April worsened in the month of May with some moderation in June. Within this challenging environment, characterized by significant declines across all of our categories, I am encouraged by many elements of our relative performance.

In the US, we saw strong market share gains in our Sun Care and preps businesses and stabilization in branded Wet Shave. And as the market leader in the category, Wet Ones saw another quarter of accelerated growth and market share gains. Internationally, we drove gains in our Wet Shave business in Japan, which is our second largest market, as well as improving share performance in Europe.

As we described a quarter ago, we remain focused during this challenging period on three key priorities: First, the health and safety of our colleagues; second, ensuring the continuity of our business operations and providing the best possible service to our customers; and third, managing the business in a disciplined and balanced manner, while ensuring we continue to invest in the long-term success of the Company.

We've made progress on all of these priorities. With the health and safety of our associates being our number one priority, the protocols we put in place as far back as December of last year have helped ensure the ongoing safety and well-being of our colleagues. The steps taken to ensure safe operations at our manufacturing plants maintain the continuity of production and availability of essential products to consumers and as such all of our global manufacturing plants and distribution centers remain open and fully operational.

We are also slowly beginning the process of bringing our teams back to offices around the world on a voluntary basis. We'll get into more detail on specific actions we've taken to strengthen the Company for both the short and long-term in a moment. But first, let me provide some color on the current environment across our markets and our top line business results in the quarter.

The significant impact of COVID-19 was evident in our organic net sales decline of 14.7% in the quarter. However, we estimate that excluding COVID-19 impacts, the business continued on a flat to slightly down top line trend. Organic sales in the quarter were most negatively impacted in Sun Care, as store traffic, holiday travel, resort business and outdoor activities were significantly curtailed by COVID-19. Sun Care, which represents approximately 20% of total Company sales accounted for nearly half of the year-over-year decline.

Leading into the Sun Care season, I was pleased with our preparation and execution, highlighted by strong innovation, robust shelf positioning across the channels, solid off-aisle [Phonetic] placements and strong initial in-stock positions, all while successfully implementing a 5% increase in price across the US mass and drug channels.

While COVID-19 has now meaningfully impacted the overall category, the 370 basis points of share gains we realized in the US in the third quarter offer some validation of our strong execution, and position us well as the category returns to more normal conditions over time. Wet Shave was also impacted by COVID-19 and the resulting stay at home trends that are headwinds to shaving regimens, with organic net sales declining 14% in the quarter.

Rounding out the Sun and Skin Care segment, we had strong organic sales growth in Wet Ones increasing 52% over the prior year and 6% over the prior quarter while remaining on track to add additional capacity in the coming weeks. Feminine Care saw a reversal of last quarter's pantry load, as well as the impact of expected distribution losses. From a market share perspective, we are in a more stable position than we were a year ago.

During the most recent 12-week period, we've seen market share growth in razors and blades in Asia, fairly stable and improving trends in Europe, and although the US branded business is still declining, share losses have stabilized, and are in line with the 52-week trend despite loss distribution in Sam's Club and further competitive rollouts.

And as mentioned, we've seen significant market share gains in the US within both Sun Care and the personal hygiene wipes categories. As we reflect on the quarter, we are cautiously optimistic that April and May will prove to be the most severely impacted months of the fiscal year given slowing rates of top line decline in June as well as quarter-to-date in our fiscal fourth quarter.

However, there remains a great deal of uncertainty and volatility that we are carefully monitoring, and will need to continue to navigate. To effectively operate in this challenging environment, we continue to manage the business in a highly disciplined and balanced way, making choices and focusing on key priorities that are most relevant in the near-term, while continuing to advance the strategic priorities that will drive our long-term success.

We tightly manage discretionary spend as the quarter evolved, reassessed trade investment and brand support including advertising and promotional activity, and prioritized investments where we believed the impact in return would be the strongest. We delivered on our Project Fuel objectives, generating $23 million in gross savings in the quarter as expected, reflecting our continued focus on creating efficiencies that in turn fund our growth investments.

With respect to our growth investments, we continue to invest in e-commerce and R&D, adding critical capabilities across both organizations. In the quarter eCommerce, net sales were once again strong, led by our growing Amazon business, and Dan will speak more about this shortly. We are operating from a position of strength in terms of liquidity with a healthy balance sheet, and over $100 million in operating cash flow generation in this COVID impacted fiscal third quarter.

During quarter three, we also successfully refinanced our 2021 notes with a high yield upsize offering [Phonetic], reflecting continued confidence in our business. We previously mentioned the importance of having the right talent profile and work environment for our employees, and our commitment to creating a culture that attracts and retains diverse world-class highly engaged talent.

This is an integral component of our overall focus on responsible environmental, social and governance practices. And in 2020, our commitment and performance in this area was recognized as Newsweek ranked Edgewell as one of America's most responsible companies. In the third quarter, we unveiled our Sustainable Care 2030 strategy establishing ten bold and comprehensive ambitions for the next decade, and reinforcing our role in creating a sustainable future.

In an increasingly uncertain world, what is certain is that we will continue to responsibly create brands and products people love to use and that our colleagues can be proud of. Importantly, I have now finalized the reshaping of my management team, a process that began upon my appointment 15 months ago. We recently announced Eric O'Toole as our new President of North America. Eric has had an impressive career spanning marketing and sales and holding other key executive roles across leading global consumer packaged goods and retail companies. His extensive experience and digital expertise will be instrumental as we continue to innovate and reshape our portfolio.

We also appointed Nick Powell as our new President of International. Nick provides tremendous global experience, and a proven track record for delivering results. And finally, we have appointed Anne-Sophie Gaget as our Chief Growth and Innovation Officer, and Paul Hibbert as our Chief Supply Chain Officer.

We also announced that Colin Hutchison, our Chief Operating Officer will be leaving Edgewell in November to start a new phase in his life in the UK. Colin has had a long and successful tenure with Edgewell and Energizer before that. Following the formation of Edgewell in 2015 as Vice President, International, Colin architected and implemented the international commercial organization before assuming the Chief Operating Officer role in 2017.

I have relied on Colin's experience and expertise in my time as the CEO, and I want to personally thank him for all that he has given to this organization, and wish him well in the next stage of his life. And finally, we are thrilled to announce our intent to acquire CREMO, a brand and company that represents a great strategic fit, as we expand our business in the fast growing US men's grooming category. As you saw in our press release and the accompanying slide deck, CREMO was one of the strongest and fastest growing Masstige brands in personal grooming, offering a complete line of products across the personal grooming category.

CREMO is in many of the highest growth subcategories of the men's grooming segment with no razors and blades, a niche that is heavily segmented, and one where we have already demonstrated our capabilities with the Jack Black and Bulldog brands. CREMO is a profitable business with a well-diversified portfolio that is synonymous with quality and unpretentious luxury. This brand will reinforce our broader insurgent playbook offering us unique portfolio options to meet a variety of consumer needs. Dan will talk more about the strategic fit and opportunity in a few moments.

In summary, though the environment remains uncertain, we continue to manage the business with strong discipline, and we are pleased to be driving trend improvement in our market share position across our key categories. Over the last 12 months, we have seen an underlying stabilization of our top line and gross margin profiles, the current COVID environment notwithstanding. This has always been an important first step in reshaping our business, and I'm pleased with our progress to date, recognizing that work remains. Importantly over recent months, we have been diligently working to develop and refine the go forward stand-alone strategy for Edgewell.

This work is progressing well, and while not finalized, you are already seeing certain fundamental elements of the work manifesting itself as seen by the CREMO announcement today, which is the execution of one pillar of our strategy. And we have talked about previously, namely increasing our penetration in the attractive growing men's grooming category beyond our existing portfolio of Jack Black and Bulldog.

In conjunction with our Board, we will be finalizing our strategy work in the weeks ahead and we plan to discuss it in more detail in calendar Q4. Before turning the call over Dan, I want to thank our teams across the Company for their focus and efforts. I continue to be inspired by the resiliency and creativity of our people during these challenging times.

Together, we are excited to push forward and execute on the next chapter of growth for Edgewell. Now, I'd like to ask Dan to take you through our fiscal third quarter results and discuss CREMO in more detail.

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Rod and good morning everyone. As Rod discussed, within this highly uncertain environment, we continue to manage the business with discipline, focused equally on near-term efficiency while taking the right steps to position Edgewell for sustainable growth.

As we navigate this challenging environment, we remain focused on our core priorities. First, execution against our commercial and operational opportunities, both short and long term. Second, strengthening the balance sheet, by ensuring a strong liquidity position, with an emphasis on maximizing cash and reinforced by our successful high yield refinancing and upsizing in the quarter. Third, maximizing our brand-building investments, by optimizing our media mix and improving in-market execution to prioritize those investments with the potential to generate the highest returns. And fourth, executing on Project Fuel where we delivered another quarter of meaningful gross savings.

While the results for the quarter reflect the unique circumstances of this COVID-19 environment, we continue to make solid progress against each of these core priorities. Our top-line performance in the quarter was largely the result of COVID-related systemic category declines across most of our segments. We are cautiously optimistic that April and May will prove to be the most significantly impacted months of the fiscal year. And the sequential improvement we saw in June and into the start of Q4 offer us some confidence that the worst of the impact in fiscal 2020 may be behind us.

Organic net sales in April decreased 15%, followed by a 19% decline in May and a 11% decline in June. July trends have further improved with net sales running down in the mid-single digits year-over-year. While we continue to see strong performance in both Wet Ones and men's grooming, the foreshadowed distribution losses in Wet Shave at Sam's Club and in Fem care at Walmart, combined with the initial reversal of last quarter's pantry loading were clear headwinds to our Q3 sales results.

From profitability standpoint, our gross margins were significantly impacted by COVID-19, both in the direct one-time costs incurred, as well as in the negative mix effect caused by the significant shift in category performance. Adjusted operating income, excluding the $3.4 million impact from the Infant and Pet Care divestiture decreased $36.4 million. Project Fuel efforts continue to drive cost savings and increased operational efficiency across all areas of our business. And in the quarter, we realized $23 million in associated gross savings representing an almost 30% increase from last quarter.

Our balance sheet and free cash flow continue to be strong with nearly $118 million in cash from operations year-to-date or $26 million higher than the same period a year ago, which was largely driven by improved working capital performance.

Now, I will turn to the detailed results. Organic net sales in the quarter decreased 14.7%, with similar declines in both North America and International. Globally, these declines were largely driven by the ongoing COVID-19 impact on consumer demand particularly in our Wet Shave and Sun Care categories. We estimate that the COVID related topline impact in the quarter was approximately $85 million which includes both the headwinds associated with Sun Care, Wet Shave and Fem care and the estimated tailwinds within the skin category driven by Wet Ones.

Excluding these effects, we estimate that the underlying organic top line run rate for the business in the quarter was flat to slightly down. Looking at our performance by segment. Wet Shave organic net sales decreased 14% in the quarter, largely driven by significant COVID-19 related category declines globally as well as the impact from the expected distribution losses in North America.

By region, North America organic net sales decreased 16%, while international markets decreased 13%. Here [Phonetic] in US, the razors and blades category was down just over 10% driven primarily by transitory declines in shaving incidents for men as a result of the mandated and voluntary stay at home periods, as well as the stock ups that occurred last quarter. For the 12-week period, our market share in razors and blades declined 190 basis points reflecting recent loss distribution at Sam's Club, heightened competitive pressures and the negative effect of channel switching away from mass and drug and into grocery.

This share [Phonetic] decline is generally in line with our 52-week performance. Excluding the impact of the loss distribution at Sam's Club, Hydro Men's grew share 40 basis points in the quarter. In our Women's Systems business, we were pleased with the launch of our new Hydro Silk and Intuition campaigns and we gave 260 basis points of market share on Amazon, which is now the third largest customer in the category.

Across our international business, category declines in key markets were similar to those in North America. And as Rod mentioned earlier, we saw improved market share performance, growing share in Japan, which is our second largest market as well as across other markets in Asia and maintaining share in Europe amid continued competitive pressure. Shave Preps followed similar patterns as the razors and blades category, and we realized 240 basis points of share gains.

Similarly, the Disposables market remained sluggish with consumption down 11% reflecting lower store traffic and the negative effect of Q2's pantry loading. Sun and Skin Care organic sales decreased nearly 19%, inclusive of a 30% organic net sales decline in Sun as global demand was significantly impacted by COVID-19 in the quarter.

Sun Care category sales were down as much as 60% in April, and although consumption trends improved as the quarter progressed with select weeks returning to slight growth in June, customer orders were severely impacted resulting in much lower net sales growth as compared to consumption. In the US, the overall Sun category declined about 18% in the quarter although Edgewell consumption was down only 5%, driving share gains of 370 basis points.

And importantly, we saw accelerated share gains with both our brands with Banana Boat and Hawaiian Tropic gaining 220 basis points and 150 basis points respectively. Sun Care sales in international markets were impacted the most in our Latin America and Asia Pacific regions, which are highly dependent on tourism and where significant COVID-19 lock downs persist.

Men's grooming increased 5%, driven by Bulldog, which benefited from strong e-commerce sales and new distribution.

Rounding off the segment, Wet Ones organic net sales increased 52% on the heels of continued strong demand for products that meet consumers' heightened hygiene and sanitation needs. The total category increased 15%, and we increased our market share 11 points to over 70% of the category. We anticipate that this brand will approach $100 million in sales for fiscal 2020 or approximately 65% year-over-year growth despite being on allocation.

As such, we are moving swiftly to meet the increased demand in the short term and our initial Wet Ones capacity expansion plans are on track for August completion. At full production, this August expansion will increase our capacity by almost a third. More broadly for the longer term, we've secured additional third-party manufacturing, which will come online later in the quarter with plans for further internal capacity expansion in fiscal 2021. We are therefore well positioned to capitalize on this consumer led focus on personal hygiene by securing ample near-term and longer term capacity in support of our category-leading brands.

Feminine Care organic sales decreased 14.7% as compared to the prior year period. The decline in net sales was largely driven by reduced volumes related to last quarter's pantry loading, overall category declines, heightened competitive pressures, and the expected distribution losses at Walmart. In terms of consumption, fem care sales declined nearly 11%, and our market share declined 130 basis points. Our e-commerce business grew organically by 76% in the quarter, fueled by 79% growth on Amazon, where we have seen 300 basis points of share gains year-to-date.

Gross margin rate decreased 200 basis points year-over-year to 46%, as favorable commodity costs and the benefit of higher pricing in Sun Care were more than offset by one-time COVID costs, unfavorable category mix, most notably from lower penetration of Sun Care sales and the deleveraging effect from lower volumes. A&P expense this quarter was 13.9% of net sales as compared to 15.1% of net sales in the prior-year period, including a $2.3 million impact from the Infant and Pet care divestiture. Advertising related costs however were flat as a percentage of net sales versus the same period last year, with a higher penetration of digital media spend as we moved away from traditional TV.

Strategically, we were focused on supporting Hydro in Japan, our Schick 5 launch in China, our seasonal programs in Sun Care, and our new campaign in women's shave in North America. SG&A including amortization expense was $91.3 million or 18.9% of net sales as compared to $94.8 million and 15.6% of net sales in the prior year period. Excluding SG&A costs associated with Project Fuel and other one-time costs, SG&A was approximately $2 million below the same period last year, driven primarily by lower travel and other discretionary spend, which more than offset incremental equity compensation and investments in key talent in North America and e-commerce. Other expense net was $3.5 million of income during the quarter compared to $2.7 million of expense in the prior year period.

The increase in income in the third quarter was largely related to favorable revaluation of balance sheet exposures, driven by the recovery of local currencies in the aftermath of significant declines in the second quarter, caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. GAAP related net earnings per share were $0.09 compared to a loss of $8.51 in the third quarter of fiscal 2019. And adjusted earnings per share were $0.66 compared to $1.11 in the prior year period.

Net cash from operating activities was $101 million for the quarter as compared to $130 million during the prior year. On a year-to-date basis, net cash from operating activities was $119 million as compared to $98 million in the prior-year period, reflecting improved working capital performance particularly in inventory management, and accounts receivable collections.

Our net debt leverage ratio was about two times reflecting the business' strong free cash flow profile, which brings me to the topic of liquidity. As we discussed last quarter, our business model is defined by strong operating cash flow generation and efficient free cash flow conversion which we demonstrated again this quarter, despite significant top and bottom line headwinds. We continue to take the necessary steps to ensure that we maintain our strong financial position.

Third quarter Project Fuel gross savings sequential increased to $23 million as compared to $18 million last quarter. We've reassessed capital expenses in a disciplined way, balancing near-term business priorities with the stated desire to maximize liquidity. And as you saw across the P&L, we're addressing all aspects of our business model and investments in the near-term to find the optimal balance of eliminating discretionary spend, while thoughtfully reinvesting in our brands.

Our balance sheet remained strong with a $425 million untapped revolver in place, over $500 million of cash on hand and a recently executed $750 million high yield notes offering. We're very well positioned to continue to weather near-term challenges, while also investing in the growth profile of this business.

This invest-for-growth priority is reflected in the CREMO acquisition that we're excited to announce today. The Men's Grooming category and in particular, soft goods is a strategic focus for us, given its attractive growth profile and our clear right to win in this space. And CREMO will help us accelerate our growth and strengthen our position in the fast growing soft categories of the men's grooming segment. Growth in this category, largely comes from insurgent brands which has outperformed established brands in the US. And this acquisition complements our existing Bulldog and Jack Black brands, providing us with a strong insurgent portfolio of brands that operate across price tiers while meeting various consumer needs.

The business will contribute to our grooming portfolio given CREMO's trailing 12 month net sales of $58 million as of June 30th, which continues to strengthen on the heels of new distribution, and offers a gross margin profile that is accretive to the Edgewell portfolio. CREMO has great brand heritage, a strong social media presence, and attractive opportunities for category, channel and geographic expansion, which we look forward to capitalizing on post close.

This all-cash transaction is expected to close by the end of our fiscal Q1 2021, and is subject to customary closing conditions. As we look ahead to the final quarter of fiscal year, the environment remains highly uncertain and therefore we are not providing a financial outlook at this time. However, as I said earlier, we saw sequential top line improvement in this business across Q3, which has continued thus far... [Technical Issues].

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Hello, Chris, can you hear me? Yeah? Everybody, it sounds like we've lost Dan. I'm going to pick up where he left off and then close out before we go to Q&A. So where Dan was going is what the heightened level of uncertainty in today's environment likely suggest a wider range of potential outcomes than normal. This trend is a reasonable proxy for the organic top line run rate for the quarter.

And additionally, while we expect to continue to see headwinds in gross margin associated with COVID-related costs, a negative category mix, we also anticipate tailwinds from further fuel savings, favorable commodity cost, and lower promotional intensity. Importantly, in the quarter, we will also continue to invest behind our key strategic priorities to ensure that we are creating and solidifying our platform to support sustainable growth.

In summary, we are operating this business with great discipline, tightly managing expenses and capital, strengthening liquidity as we continue to generate savings from our Project Fuel work and making strategic and thoughtful reinvestments in growth both organically and inorganically. And so with that, I'll go ahead and close this out.

So I think as you can tell from everything that we're talking about here, we have been working tirelessly to reposition the Edgewell business. We've stabilized the underlying top line, and gross margin profiles, and we've been improving our execution on shelf. And while the headwinds associated with COVID-19 significantly impacted our reported results in the quarter, our underlying progress has continued.

And it starts with the commitment to discipline and execution across the organization, something that we've increasingly focused on over the last year, and is seen not only in our continued Fuel results, but also in our seamless operational performance during this COVID environment, and our efforts to strengthen our balance sheet.

Our global Wet Shave business is on the most solid footing that we've seen in quite some time, with solid performance internationally, including market share gains in our second biggest market in Japan and signs of structural improvement in the US in both Men's and Women's branded Shave.

Clearly, COVID-19 has completely disrupted the Sun Care season including our largest market, the US. However, our execution was very strong with the combination of strong product placement, good off-aisle presence and effective consumer messaging, all contributing to a sizable 370 basis points share gain in the quarter, which positions us very well heading into next year's Sun season. The consumer's focus on personal hygiene and desire to utilize known brands that they can trust continues to benefit our Wet Ones brand. And we are quickly approaching a $100 million brand with plans in place both near-term and longer term to increase capacity at a level required to meet ongoing increased consumer demand.

It's clear that this fundamental shift in consumer behavior is not transitory, and we are well positioned to capture further growth in 2021 and beyond. And that then brings me to the announcement to acquire CREMO. This profitable brand is the clear market leader in soft goods across the grooming space, has an exciting growth profile and is gross margin accretive to the Edgewell portfolio. And a strengthened Beard Care and to a lesser degree, body wash provide a strong diversification for the Edgewell portfolio.

It's often difficult to look past these highly volatile days of COVID-19. But as we look forward to 2021, we see a business that is operating more effectively driven by a more stable top line, and gross margin profile and underpinned by a full portfolio of brands that could be seen as a catalyst for growth from global Sun Care to men's grooming to Wet Ones and finally International Shave. We are committed to the continued transformation of the business and are convinced that we are on the right path and making good progress.

And with that, I'll turn the call back over to the operator for questions.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

Thank you. [Operator Instructions]. We will now proceed with the Q&A session. Our first question comes from Will Chappell, SunTrust [Phonetic] Securities. You may proceed.

William Chappell -- SunTrust -- Analyst

Thanks, good morning. Can you hear me?

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. Hey Bill. Good morning.

William Chappell -- SunTrust -- Analyst

Sorry, it seems like couple of technical difficulties, just checking in. Hey Rod, I guess on Wet Shave and I understand that you're going to unveil broader plans for the strategy in a few months, but I mean, can you just help us understand how CREMO kind of fits in? Is this the last piece of multiple acquisitions to kind of fortify the business, do you need to do more? Are there other more organic plans expected or -- I'm just trying to understand maybe a little bit of a preview of what you're expecting for the -- for Wet Shave kind of long-term strategy.

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. Thanks, Bill. Apologies to you and others on the line with the technical difficulties. I was concerned for a moment that Dan wasn't going to be able to rejoin and I was going to have to like, go back to my CFO chair days, which is maybe a more difficult position on calls like this. But, I think we're all back on and good now.

Look, we're confident that Wet Shave in particular, and then broader grooming, so the skin care regimen, and that whole category is still a great place to play, and a good place to be in business. We are -- we are seeing, and I think Procter alluded to this as well. We had not only some stock up in quarter two that negatively impacted this quarter in Wet Shave, but you can see it when you -- when you go around or see the Zoom calls, there is less shaving happening right now. I think we're confident based on everything we see, studies we've done, that this is a temporary situation in terms of Shave incidents declining during the work from home, and more restricted environment.

We think the category will return to normal which normally would be a flattish to maybe slightly positive. Sales line for blades and razors in that Wet Shave definition with continued very fast growth across the balance of the grooming segments that are more around men skincare, Beard Care, preps, moisturizers, any perspirant deodorant. There is a lot of growth in those grooming categories as more and more men use more products in their daily regimens.

So you balance that out. We think the growth across broader grooming inclusive in blades and razors returns to normal, has growth in it, and structurally from a structural profitability and economic standpoint is highly valuable. And we think we've got the right capabilities to win. And so this is an acquisition into that -- into that area, around grooming. And we like our portfolio that we have and think it's differentiated to hit all the key consumer segments.

The leaky bucket we've had in blades and razors primarily in the men's category, which I'm not happy with our performance and where that business has been, we're addressing, and we're addressing it with urgency around building brands that better resonate with the consumers, have a new innovation coming that's going to be a lot more interesting, and ultimately, building better retailer relationships and having better outcome at the shelf in terms of our placement and positioning.

So the strategy is going to be focused on doing all of those things, and again CREMO is a key piece to expose us to the fastest growing part of the grooming segment.

William Chappell -- SunTrust -- Analyst

Okay. And then Dan, if you're on the call, just a follow-up on Sun Care, and how it kind of works through the P&L. Just trying to understand, did the June quarter, I mean, do you have excess inventory that now sits through next year? Did you accrue for returns that will happen this quarter? And just kind of understand if there is any lingering impact for the weak Sun Care season and how that carries over into 2021?

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Sure. Absolutely. And good morning everyone. And again, apologies for the technical difficulties. No -- look, Sun Care is always a difficult category to model, and trying to get sort of the peak consumption period right, which we know the sell-in and we have lags there. So there is -- there is a -- there is always a difficulty in the model, obviously made harder by COVID.

But we feel really good about our inventory position. We feel really good about sort of the state of the product that trade. We don't anticipate heightened returns risk or accruals. We've been monitoring this obviously quite closely over the course of the last six weeks to eight weeks in particular and we'll continue to do so. So no, we don't anticipate Q4 or looking into 2021 with heightened risk. We've taken the appropriate provisions.

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, and Will, if I could -- if I could add to that, not only do we feel good about where we are in the season here in terms of financial exposure and how we're operating with retailers and retail trade, very simplistically what happened in Sun Care this year is we lost the first part of the season, by and large.

Spring break didn't happen like it normally does, that Easter period, which is a heavy beach vacation season didn't happen. And then by and large Memorial Day didn't happen like it normally did. And so you saw the category very depressed through that early to mid-June period. As we got into later June, and then into July and now the beginning of August, we've actually seen the category recover from being down in some weeks as much as 60% at the beginning of the season to even having growth in some more of the recent weeks that we've seen.

And so I think we're ending the season in a way where a lot of the inventory that was placed in is now moving and turning, in fact, ahead of year ago in some cases. And so, not only do we feel like we're ending the season in a clean way, we're quite optimistic as we look forward to the next year as we figure out how to move around and be outside safely that will return to not only more of a normal Sun season, but we, Edgewell and our brands enter that in a real position of strength with our performance this year on the share growth as we work with retailers and partner on the sets for next year.

William Chappell -- SunTrust -- Analyst

That's great. Thank you for the color.

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Operator, next question please.

Operator

Our next question comes from Kevin Grundy, Jefferies. You may proceed.

Kevin Grundy -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Hey, good morning everyone, thanks for taking the question. So I wanted to start off with the decision not to formally reinstitute guidance this year, and understanding, I don't want to get too hung up on one quarter. But appreciating the volatility with COVID, Rod you talked about some recalibration in the Wet Shave strategy, which I think people will appreciate. But at the same time given the challenging quarter and we've seen a number of HPC companies reinstitute the practice of providing guidance and instilling some confidence, I think for the shareholder base. I just was hoping for some of the key areas of variability.

Dan, I think you talked about mid-single digit declines in June, which seems representative of what you're seeing. Rod, you talked about Wet Shave being on more solid footing and feeling better about where you are with retailers. Maybe just to push you a little bit, maybe talk about the biggest areas of variability, and the decision not to formalize guidance here for the remainder of the year. And then I have a follow-up. Thanks.

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, Dan go ahead.

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. I think it is -- it is simply a recognition that the uncertainties that surround COVID far outweigh the knowns and the certainties. And that's the reality, particularly as we head into the back end of the summer and the Sun Care season.

But just to kind of reiterate, our line of sight to the quarter, we did provide some color to that in the call, and I'll just -- I'll sort of tick through it, because I think it's helpful. You hit the first point, absolutely right, Kevin, we do see a sequentially improving top line. We think that we cycle through the lowest of the low of COVID related impacts in that May time period, saw the exit rate on the quarter strengthen and that's continued in July.

So we're pleased about that mid-single digit declines is a good proxy. We also are seeing a bit more stability in the margin profile of the business. There are still headwinds related to COVID for sure, one time and other. We anticipate slightly less impact from category shift in the margin profile. And as we start to cycle through the Q2 pantry loading, there is a less of an effect in shifting of segments, less volatility in margins. We obviously have the price increase, we have the fuel savings, and we continue to anticipate a positive tailwind from commodities.

So again, I think while difficult to quantify, we're seeing a more stable margin profile than we exited Q3 with. And we're going to continue to invest in this business. We feel like we spent extremely efficiently in Q2 behind our priorities in Japan, in Women's, in Sun, and we're going to continue to do that in Q4. So that's how we're thinking about the quarter sort of in high level points. But again, shying away from trying to quantify it, because the range of outcomes is still too wide.

Kevin Grundy -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Okay. I appreciate the color. I'll pick up with Chris offline. Just while I have you guys, on the CREMO deal, can you offer a little bit how that came about, maybe some financial information, EBITDA on that business, you did mention it was profitable growth rate. What you think you can do with this in terms of revenue and cost synergies, and then -- and where you see sort of the biggest opportunities from a distribution perspective, both from a channel and perhaps even geographic, and then I'll pass it on. Thanks.

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. Kevin, I'll start and I'll throw it over to Dan for some of the specifics. How it came about? We had the FTC block our transaction with Harry's back in the winter, and coming out of that is we've done the strategy work, again, which we'll be prepared to talk more about here in a few months in detail. And it's really about getting the bottom up 2021 planning work done to have a solid basis, in place for that.

But we were always very interested in increasing our exposure around men's grooming. So again, the non-blades and razors segment where there is significant double-digit growth happening across the category. And a big part of the rationale, the Harry's transaction was not only the portfolio that existed there, but the ability to grow and drive that part of the business.

And we very much see this as a pure play grooming, execution where that category growth is the fastest was CREMO. And so again it's -- you're seeing us just follow through ultimately on what was a failed transaction with what we're confident will be a successful transaction to really grab [Phonetic] that growth in a bigger way. So that's how it came about. Dan, you want to take the rest?

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Sure. Yeah, I mean, I'll probably shy away from giving specifics, but I'll add certainly some color. The top line of this business is extremely attractive. It's got a very healthy growth rate, you saw the numbers $58 million TTM sales in June. It's growing by both velocity and distribution gains. It's the largest niche brand in its space, ex razors and blades. So it's a -- it's a healthy book of business that has a really attractive growth algorithm to it.

It is profitable, it has a gross margin profile that's accretive to the Edgewell portfolio, which we're excited about. And in terms of expansion, we see quite a bit of opportunity for this brand. At the channel level, reasonably well distributed in mass, but certainly opportunities there as well as drug, grocery and online where its business is quite small today. And also geographically, we're quite excited about the opportunity to bring this brand into our international portfolio.

So, there is a lot to like about this acquisition, and about the business model.

Kevin Grundy -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Okay. I appreciate the color, guys. Good luck.

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Chris Gough -- Vice President, Investor Relations

Operator, next question please.

Operator

Next question comes from Mr. Jason English, Goldman Sachs. You may proceed.

Jason English -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Thank you. Hey, good morning folks. Hope all is well.

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Good morning, Jason.

Jason English -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Good morning. The underlying market share trends are encouraging. You're clearly expressing the narrative of a lot of confidence that the base business you have today is turning around, stabilizing and improving from here. Meanwhile, it doesn't appear to be reflected in your valuation. And with the amount of cash you spent on CREMO today, you could have purchased probably around 15% of your shares outstanding.

So it's a pretty high bar in terms of the accretion math or the value of that must come from CREMO to match that. Quick back in the envelope math suggests you need to scale that business to north of $200 million to match the same type of return of just buying back yourself at this current valuation.

So a couple of questions. And I guess the redundant a bit to what Grundy asked, but you didn't give a lot of specificity, so I'm probably back at it. One, do you generally agree with that sort of conceptual math? And two, do you think that's possible that you could scale that size? And three, what's the pathway? Like, where is it distributed today? Where can you get it to? What are the revenue synergies?

Help us get confidence that this is the best -- the best use of the cash and at least as good and hopefully if not better than just buying back your own stock at this valuation. Thanks.

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, good morning, Jason. Fair question. Right. And as we look at capital allocation, you know, I think we've talked about our relative priority around organic needs of the business, smart disciplined acquisitions and then you look in to share repurchase potentially dividends, right, all of those things are things we're looking at and are on the table as we look at our strategy going forward.

You know, I think we're ready to declare all of those today. But that's something more formally and more specifically. We will have a point of view on when we -- when we have more time with you all and the investors in Q4 as we think about Investor Day, and telling the story in a more detailed way.

Relative to CREMO, I'm not going to get into more specifics on the assumptions, other than to tell you that I don't want to give away like specifically our plans, other than to tell you, we see significant upside in the brand, in the business itself, in terms of distribution expansion, where it's not today. But also there is an interplay here with our base Edgewell brands and business, and this is part of the story to regain credibility and to regain our footing with not only end consumers who interact with and use our brands, but also with retailers.

We frankly over the last couple of years have lost confidence that we could be a legitimate partner in Wet Shave and grooming. And as we rebuild that, we build back our position, not only with better brand building capabilities, better omni-channel execution, better retailer relationships this is one piece of the arsenal to go do that. And it's a big piece, because it signals we're serious about winning and being successful in our primary category here.

And so again, we've done the math and I'll tell you we're confident we can create a lot of value here. And we spent a lot of time looking at that and going through the assumptions and through the comparable choices and we feel like this is the right choice today for our shareholders.

Jason English -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Okay. I appreciate that. That's helpful. And just going back to the market share performance, the figures you gave on at least the US razors and blades market share, I think you said the last 12 weeks, down 120 basis points or so, look worse than what we've seen in the Nielsen data. I'm guessing that the differential is your private label business as private label does appear to be losing share in the US. Is that right? Is it that your brands are doing better, but private labels, the negative offset. And if so, what do you believe is driving the private label share weakness? And any thoughts or anything we should contemplate as we think about the forward trajectory for that business?

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Jason, so we have private label down 6% in the quarter. It was up 2% in the first half of the year. So it stepped back a little bit, but it still beat the category which we had at down 10%, and so private label did not perform worse than our branded business. There is a couple of things going on. I think there is -- there is specifically the biggest change in the business is we lost distribution at Sam's Club in the February-March planogram resets, actually a little before that, where we lost a big chunk of Systems business.

And again, I don't know how that's flowing through the share reports and that's the single biggest drag. Absent that, we're actually growing share in other channels, with other customers that then holds the share relatively flat overall, in terms of the trajectory that it was on. Dan, I don't know if there's anything else you would add to that?

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, I think good comments. Maybe Jason for perspective, our total portfolio share in the quarter was flat, which I think is a significant statement. It was actually up 100 basis points in unit share. You saw the strong performance in Sun and Shave preps still challenged results in fem for example. But we knew the impact on the branded side of the business that was coming from the distribution losses in Sam's on both Men's and Women's. Not that I'm trying to isolate that, but if you exclude the Sam's distribution loss, Hydro Men's and Hydro Silk both gained 40 basis points to 50 basis points of share, strong performance at target, strong performance in food.

So again, we have a lot of work to do here, but I think a more stable share results in our branded business is what we take away from the quarter as encouraging signs.

Jason English -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Thank you very much. I'll pass it on.

Chris Gough -- Vice President, Investor Relations

Operator, next question, please.

Operator

Our next question comes from Faiza Alwy, Deutsche Bank. You may proceed.

Faiza Alwy -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Yes. Hi, good morning everyone. So, I wanted to talk a little bit about investment spending, and sort of where you are in that process. And I'm wondering if you can give us a little bit of a preview as you talk about your strategy. Because it seems that so far, a lot of your competitors within household, personal care, have been spending significantly behind the category, just overall across categories. So it seems like the cost of growth is increasing, and I wonder how you were thinking about it, and whether you think there is more that you can do in terms of expanding Project Fuel?

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So I'll take it in two parts. On the investment side of the business, we obviously had to make significant steps to prioritize in the quarter given the COVID-related pressures we felt in the topline. We prioritized against our strategic priorities, and I think I referred to those in my comments. So, Japan and Hydro, Schick 5 launch in China, the Women's Shave business in the US and of course Sun Care. If you look at our spend overall though, our advertising dollars as a percentage of net sales were actually flat year-over-year. Where you saw the lion's share of the declines was in the promotional end of the spend, if you will, which is not surprising, right, you see less display activity, less merchandising, less consumer promotion. So we did feel like we invested at the right level.

But importantly, invested behind the right priorities and we're going to continue to do that going forward. As far as -- are there further legs for fuel? Certainly, the answer to that is yes. And not so much because of the Fuel program which technically has another year left in it. But just by the way we are running this business and the push that we have on productivity and efficiency. That is in the DNA of the organization. That is not about a named program. And so we are going to continue to run this business with the same level of focus and effort on fuel like savings, irrespective of that program.

We're confident there is continued runway there in terms of productivity gains and efficiency gains for the business.

Faiza Alwy -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Okay, that's helpful. But do you think sort of longer term, do you think that you need to further increase your A&P spending or just general investment spending overall?

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

We do. And in fact, if you remember that was -- that was embedded in our outlook for 2020 when we began the year. We were leaning in on A&P spend and R&D spend to the tune of plus $20 million or so year-over-year. That's what we had anticipated, and we are on that path, pre-COVID. We've made the necessary adjustments, given the pressures in the quarter, but we still maintain a leaning in stance when it comes to investments behind the right strategic priorities.

Faiza Alwy -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Okay. Thank you.

Chris Gough -- Vice President, Investor Relations

Thank you. Operator, next question please.

Operator

Our next question comes from Olivia Tong. You may proceed.

Olivia Tong -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Great. Thanks. Good morning. First I want to ask you about Wet Shave and just the competitive environment, whether you're seeing more from main branded competitor or is it more coming from the newer disruptor brands? And then assuming that the COVID impacts sort of turn into recession challenges over time, can you talk about your expectations of your business in terms of the branded versus the private label performance and then mix? Thanks.

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. Thank you, Olivia. Good morning. On Wet Shave, the competitive environment is really high, right? It remains a highly competitive segment. There is no doubt. And Procter is very good at what they do. We have a lot of respect for them. And, they're operating well in the category as the leader. We know the Harry's business pretty well by spending time with them, they're a talented group and have brought innovation, and new thinking to the category. And you've got Dollar Shave there with Unilever, right, backing that, that when you put that all together, it's a highly competitive environment.

And despite the competition and where it sits, if you look at the consumer, and you look at the totality of the portfolio that each of us have, we have a very interesting portfolio that has a right to win and exist with consumers in segments where we play. We've got -- we've got great technology and quality. We -- for the US market we grind blades in the US, like there is a lot of things we can play with as we move forward to be successful in these categories.

And I think we're increasingly confident we can be despite the competitive environment, OK? So that's what I would say on Wet Shave and the competitive environment. Again increasingly confident given what we have line of sight to.

On the recession, it's a great question, because I think this is what we're all facing, and this is likely to come out of this, again, I think our portfolio sets up well in a recessionary environment. We're not in many cases the price leader. We play more in mid-tier and value segments and then we have the big private label piece of the business. And if you look back to past recessions, you've seen trade down to private label.

And so, I would expect that to happen again. As you have more value offerings and better disposable, you know, options, I think, those -- those segments are also potentially net winners in this. So it's not just about private label. But again, I think we feel good about our portfolio, and our price points, not just in Shave by the way, but in Sun Care, Hawaiian Tropic and Banana Boats are both right in the mid tier pricing zone.

We think that's part of why they're winning today versus some of the higher priced alternatives. And so again from a recession proof portfolio, I think we've got one that is recession proof as any other out there in the categories where we play.

Olivia Tong -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

All right, thanks. And then just one follow up. You mentioned your thoughts on the COVID impact to sales, but how much do you think COVID related costs impacted SG&A in particular? Because the costs saves were pretty solid in fuel savings, but assuming the quarter was relatively in line on both a year over year and sequential basis, despite the sales shortfall. So just wondering, you know, if you could talk a little bit about that. Thank you.

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Sure. Yeah. I would say that the COVID impact outside of sales first of all hit us most significantly in gross margin. We talked about that. Both the one time costs and the channel shifting, segment shifting that occurred which was negative to our margin profile. In terms of SG&A, we feel really good about our ability to pull back on non-discretionary spend and discretionary spend, prioritize where we want to spend behind the business. We essentially didn't hire headcount during the quarter other than key talent that we needed to bring in to the organization. You heard Rod talk about that, for example, with Eric O'Toole. So we made conscious choices to both pull back where we thought it was smart and thoughtful to do so, but also invest in talent and capabilities, both in our North America leadership structure, and also in our eCommerce and R&D organizations.

And those are partial offsets for the savings that you're seeing as a result of COVID.

Olivia Tong -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Thank you.

Chris Gough -- Vice President, Investor Relations

Thanks, Olivia. Operator next question, please.

Operator

Next question from Nik Modi, RBC Capital Market. You may proceed.

Nik Modi -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

Thanks. Good morning, everyone. Hey, Rod, I was hoping you can just talk a little bit about the share progress that you've made and maybe helping us understand some of the underlying dynamics there. I mean, is this velocity, is it distribution, is this based on, you know, perhaps some delays in product launches. And then I guess kind of dovetailing with that is, you know, distribution losses have been pretty common over the last several quarters, and I'm just curious like when you think the leaky bucket will -- will kind of get, you know, stop leaking?

Any perspective around that would be helpful.

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. Thanks, Nik. Good morning.The share position or the -- let's call it the share stabilization, we're seeing particularly in Wet Shave, has little to nothing to do with distribution gains, we've had none in Wet Shave. You know, we've had some improved positioning here and there at a couple of retailers. We've picked up a little incremental here and there behind some innovation. But largely, we've been donating shelf to the competitive set now for the last three or four years.

And so, what we're seeing is better execution and performance within the space we have. So it's around velocities outside of measured share. It's around better communication programs and better innovation, particularly on our women's portfolio in the Hydro line where we're -- we're growing share rapidly on Amazon, around some of the Hydro Silk and Intuition lines. And so, I think it's better execution, it's better messaging, and it's all around velocity.

In terms of the leaky bucket, the real chance to impact that, as you know is in here in the US is in the spring planogram reset timing, in the late winter, early spring. And as you might expect, we've been hard at work on building plans that are better and more interesting, and partnering with retailers to stop the leaky bucket, but not only stop the leaky bucket, get some additional space back that we've lost over the last couple of years.

And so, you know, we're -- we're working hard on that, that's the next real opportunity, in Wet Shave to stop the leaky bucket and move that forward. That applies to Fem Care as well. The single biggest drag in our Fem Care business over the last three or four years that perfectly correlates to the top line decline is lost shelf space and lost distribution. And we're cycling another one of those this year at Walmart in particular. Again, as we move forward off of the base that we have, I think we're increasingly confident that we can hold distribution and build some back as we move forward.

And that's just part of the confidence, I think we have that that the key driver of decline in this business has been around two things, engagement with the consumer, we're working very hard on that to have better engagement with consumers, and then having more real estate at shelf. It's that simple.

And again, I think as we look to next year, it'll be proven on where we land, but I think we're feeling increasingly confident across the portfolio that we can land better outcomes.

Nik Modi -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

Thank you very helpful.

Chris Gough -- Vice President, Investor Relations

Operator, next question, please.

Operator

Next question comes from Jonathan Feeney, Consumer Edge. You may proceed.

Jonathan Feeney -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

Good morning. Thanks very much. I just wanted to clarify a comment earlier, when you said your portfolio share was flat, is that flat ex-distribution losses, like across all of your brands and businesses in the US, you're saying your share was flat. Could you clarify that?

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, that's exactly what it is. So if you take the US portfolio in totality, the categories in which we compete, share was flat and that was obviously driven by robust gains in categories like Sun and Shave Preps, and then obviously share losses in areas like Sun Care as we've talked about.

Jonathan Feeney -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

And that ties to, I believe it was Rod's comment in the prepared remarks about 40 basis points of share gain for the Hydro franchise, excluding distribution losses is that right also?

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Same math, same figures, slightly different obviously because we excluded from that calculation, the known losses at Sam's on Hydro and said absent of that, we saw 40 basis points of gains, but same database and same math.

Jonathan Feeney -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

Got you. Okay. So I mean, it really seems like it'd be fair to say that when you lap these distribution losses, you're relatively happy or at least happy with the share progression within your businesses across the board. I mean, well, I guess maybe I'm not going to, I'm just asking if you're happy, but how is that compared to your plan coming into this quarter? Like, are you pleased with that relative to your plan?

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, maybe the way to think about it is if you look at the distribution losses that we saw on Sam's, on both Men's and Women's branded, you look at a heightened competitive environment that Rod talked about, obviously we're cycling through COVID, you look at the channel shifting that took place, which was not favorable to our business, moves into food for example and out of our mass and drug.

You put all of that together and you look on the men's side of the business at a share picture that's largely in line with our 52-week trend. So while facing those headwinds, and the known distribution losses from Sam's, our share position was largely in line with longer-term trend. That's an encouraging sign for us as we think about the quarter.

As Rod said, obviously a lot of work remains, but I think an important point of context.

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, John, [Speech Overlap] yeah, John, if I could just build on that one point, I think, are we happy about where we are versus plan ex-COVID around share? Yes, we are. Are we happy with much else relative to where we are overall? No. We are very dissatisfied particularly in Wet Shave and in the US men's business on where we are. And we're very hungry to change that, and not only get to a place where we're growing market share across the portfolio, but we're creating a lot of value for shareholders. We're very cognizant. Today, we are not doing that. But that's what we're working to do.

Jonathan Feeney -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

And one unrelated question, if I might. These -- when you think about Jack Black, Bullfrog and now your latest acquisition, longer term, I mean how does -- how does the broadly speaking, how does the manufacturing and fulfillment overlap look? Is this a question of, you can utilize existing capacity, which may be utilization isn't where you want it to be, or are these just -- do you have to just keep these businesses completely separate forever and try to maintain the quality niche, whatever it is that just the nature of the business? Thanks.

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. So Jonathan, I am going to correct one thing you said, because our brand team would not be happy. It's Jack Black, CREMO and Bulldog -- we're not sort of a frog.

Jonathan Feeney -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

Oh, sorry about that.

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

We have respect for Bull frog too, but... [Speech Overlap]

Jonathan Feeney -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

It's pouring rain outside, so that's probably what made me say that. I'm sorry.

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, that's OK. We've had our own technical issues this morning.

No, today these brands largely as we've acquired them, manufacture via third party outside manufacturing relationships, all formula cards owned, all the R&D product development in-house owned, but executed via third-party manufacturing, of typically a finished product. And so as we look at that across the three brands, there is obviously opportunity to leverage scale across that.

In fact, in some cases, the third-party manufacturers are the same. And so as we look at that, becoming highly efficient, but not losing anything around the formulation or the efficacy of the product. That frankly is the magic here beyond the brand positioning where consumers love the brands and the experience they have.

We're not going to lose any of that, and that will be very unique, very distinct, different teams working on that, but there will be some back-end efficiency we think we can drive.

Jonathan Feeney -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

Thank you very much.

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Chris Gough -- Vice President, Investor Relations

Thank you. Operator, next question please.

Operator

No more questions. I would like to turn the conference back over to the speaker for any closing remarks.

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

All right. Thank you everybody. Appreciate your time and running a little longer today. And thanks for the interest in Edgewell. Again, I think dynamic times here, and I hope everyone stays safe and healthy as we move forward hopefully to a better times in not too distant future. Thank you.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks].

Duration: 76 minutes

Call participants:

Chris Gough -- Vice President, Investor Relations

Rod R. Little -- President and Chief Executive Officer

Daniel Sullivan -- Chief Financial Officer

William Chappell -- SunTrust -- Analyst

Kevin Grundy -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Jason English -- Goldman Sachs -- Analyst

Faiza Alwy -- Deutsche Bank -- Analyst

Olivia Tong -- Bank of America Merrill Lynch -- Analyst

Nik Modi -- RBC Capital Markets -- Analyst

Jonathan Feeney -- Consumer Edge Research -- Analyst

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