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Twilio (NYSE:TWLO)
Q1 2021 Earnings Call
May 05, 2021, 5:00 p.m. ET

Contents:

  • Prepared Remarks
  • Questions and Answers
  • Call Participants

Prepared Remarks:


Operator

Good day, and thank you for standing by. Welcome to the Twilio Q1 2021 earnings conference call. [Operator instructions] Please be advised that today's conference is being recorded. [Operator instructions] I would now like to hand the conference over to Andrew Zilli, vice president of investor relations and treasury.

Sir, please go ahead.

Andrew Zilli -- Vice President of Investor Relations and Treasury

Thanks, Lea. Good afternoon, everyone. And thank you for joining us for Twilio's first-quarter 2021 earnings conference call. In an effort to make our call more efficient, we are using a new approach today by posting our prepared remarks on our IR website and using today's call for Q&A only.

In addition to our prepared remarks, our earnings press release, SEC filings and a replay of today's call can be found on our IR website at investors.twilio.com. Joining me today for Q&A are Jeff Lawson, co-founder and CEO; George Hu, COO; and Khozema Shipchandler, CFO. As a reminder, some of our commentary today may be in non-GAAP terms. Reconciliations between our GAAP and non-GAAP results and guidance can be found in our earnings press release.

Additionally, some of our discussions and responses may contain forward-looking statements, which are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions, in particular, our expected business benefits and financial impacts from the Segment and ValueFirst acquisitions and the Syniverse partnership, including the associated transactions, our expectations around the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our business, results of operations and financial condition and that of our customers and partners is subject to change. And our ability to manage changes in network service provider fees that we pay in connection with the delivery of communications on our platform and the impact of those fees on our gross margin are subject to change. Should any of these risks materialize or should our assumptions prove to be incorrect, actual financial results could differ materially from our projections or those implied by these forward-looking statements. A description of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions and other factors that could affect our financial results are included in our SEC filings, including our most recent report on Form 10-K and subsequent reports on Form 10-Q.

And our remarks during today's discussion should be considered to incorporate this information by reference. Forward-looking statements represent our beliefs and assumptions only as of the date such statements are made. We undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements made during this call to reflect events or circumstances after today or to reflect new information or the occurrence of unanticipated events, except as required by law. With that, I'll hand it over to Jeff for a brief statement, and then we'll open the call for Q&A.

Jeff Lawson -- Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Zilli. Before going into Q&A, I wanted to acknowledge that over the past year fighting COVID-19, each country and region has had good times and bad times. While many places are trending well and we feel like we hope we can see the light at the end of the tunnel, the response to COVID-19 is, of course, not over. And the tragedy of this pandemic remains an evolving situation and even on a global level.

So I want to take a moment to share my heartfelt sorrow in support for our colleagues, friends and families in India who we know are fighting a tremendous outbreak. Along with our colleagues, friends and family in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, it's a reminder that this pandemic is not over and will not be over until every country, every city, every community in the world is through it. We are truly in this pandemic together as a global community. Twilio has created several programs to help communities in the hardest-hit regions providing additional matching funds to organizations such as AID India COVID-19 Relief Program, Give2Asia and Direct Relief.

It is more important than ever to help every country combat this pandemic. And we hope that these efforts will help provide funds toward that cause. And I invite everybody listening today to pitch in your support as you can. Thank you.

Now let's open the call for questions.

Questions & Answers:


Operator

[Operator instructions] Your first question comes from the line of Meta Marshall from Morgan Stanley. Your line is now open.

Meta Marshall -- Morgan Stanley -- Analyst

Great. Thanks for the question, and congrats on the quarter. Maybe a higher-level question. I wanted to get a sense of what your customer conversations are like.

I imagine a year ago, it was, help me get through the next two weeks, to maybe six months ago, it was like, help me get through COVID, to now, people are really starting to embrace digital transformation and think longer term. But just -- is that something that we just hypothesize? Or you're actually seeing in customer conversations? And how does Segment change that conversation? Thanks.

George Hu -- Chief Operating Officer

Hi, this is George. Why don't I start? We absolutely are continuing to see the conversations around digital transformation, digital acceleration. What we've talked to, what I've talked to a lot of customers about is now that they see kind of the end of the pandemic insight, they're not foreseeing that digital is going away for them, that they see a lot of the transitions that have happened to digital, whether it's telemedicine or digital relationships and financial services, are going to continue. And so they're looking for us to be strategic partners to help them move to the new world and with technologies like conversations in Flex and other things that we've been working on.

In terms of Segment, the people are very excited about it. I've had it come up in probably more than two-thirds of the calls I've been on with customers in the last 90 days. We've talked about Segment and the opportunity there. I think people are very excited about the idea of delivering much more personalized engagement.

And the idea of Segment as a foundational component to that is very interesting for a lot of customers. So we're excited about that and the opportunity for us going forward on that front as well.

Meta Marshall -- Morgan Stanley -- Analyst

Great. Thanks.

Operator

Thank you. And your next question comes from the line of Samad Samana from Jefferies. Your line is now open.

Samad Samana -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Hi. Great. Thanks for taking my questions, and congrats on the strong quarter. Maybe the first on the enterprise sales hiring side.

I saw in the prepared remarks that the company has caught up. But maybe how should we think about the hiring from here and how the productivity ramp looks for those new direct -- those enterprise sales rep hires?

George Hu -- Chief Operating Officer

Yeah. We're absolutely on track with our sales hiring. We continue to invest in capacity to match the -- frankly, the incredible opportunity that we see in front of us. And in terms of the productivity, that has continued to be strong.

And the ramp times are consistent. So we haven't really seen a significant shift as we added capacity, which is -- I think this really speaks to the demand out there and the size of the opportunity.

Samad Samana -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Great. And then, maybe just a follow-up on the decision to split the R&D organization that was discussed then and how we should think about that impacting the innovation cycle going forward.

Jeff Lawson -- Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, thanks for the question, Samad. This is Jeff. I'll take that one. So we've got a very broad set of products and a very broad customer base all around the world.

And so we thought the way to best serve the broad set of customers, the broad set of products was to break it out to three units: so by our Twilio core communications platform, our data platform and our core platform. And we've got great leaders for a lot of these things. And you can see a lot of synergies between like all the things we're doing in communications, which is the core business. Lots of things we're doing with data, and Peter from Segment is gonna lead the data team.

And then, a core platform is sort of how we build internally and all the platforms to support the growth of all of our engineering units. And so by dividing and conquering, we think we can actually tackle more to continue our track record of innovation and continue to serve our customers at scale. And so I'm really appreciative of Chee and everything he's brought to the company. And looking forward to building the next great set of products with the great set of leaders we have and the ones we're gonna hire.

Samad Samana -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Great. And just as an aside, we love the new reporting structure. It allows us to spend more quality time with the management team rather than listen to you guys read the script to us. So really appreciate that, and appreciate the additional time with you all.

Jeff Lawson -- Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Fantastic.

Operator

Thank you. Your next question comes from the line of Fred Havemeyer from Macquarie. Your line is now open.

Fred Havemeyer -- Macquarie Group -- Analyst

Hey, thank you very much for the time here. I'm interested in some of the acquisitions and investments that you've recently been making, including Syniverse and ValueFirst. Can you help us understand how these acquisitions, investments and partnerships could help your overall cost structure, both domestically and internationally? And secondly, on this topic, could you tell us about how these investments could benefit your customers across areas such as pricing and also reliability of services?

Khozema Shipchandler -- Chief Financial Officer -- Analyst

Yeah. Those are good questions. This is Khozema. I'll start.

So I think from a cost-structure perspective, obviously, having local presence in markets and being able to do some consolidation within our supply chain is always going to yield some cost synergies. And so, we definitely have an eye on that in terms of some of the ways that we're looking at it. I think beyond that, if you look at some of the more recent things, like whether it's in Mexico or whether it's India, that also gives us enhanced geographic footprint. So it allows us to better see consumer demand in some of those markets as well.

And then, from a pricing perspective, I mean, I wouldn't say there's a big change in pricing relative to M&A. I mean, it, obviously, remains a competitive pricing landscape. But I think, we feel good about the way that we're positioned, and I think this allows us to continue to geographically expand.

Fred Havemeyer -- Macquarie Group -- Analyst

Great, thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Your next question comes from the line of Brent Bracelin from Piper Sandler. Your line is now open.

Brent Bracelin -- Piper Sandler -- Analyst

Hey, I'll echo comments of appreciation here on the new format. Super efficient and super helpful. Maybe, Jeff, I'll start with you. We're six months now into the Twilio-Segment kind of combination here.

My question for you: what are you most excited about and most pleased with during the first six months of the integration here? And then, I know it's early, but we're seeing some interesting personalized messages come out, some interesting Flex-Segment integrations. And then, secondly, what are you most excited about now that you know what you own here, looking out over the next couple of years?

Jeff Lawson -- Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, thank you for the question. Well, first of all, the nuts and bolts of integration are hard, but they're going really well, been really pleased by just a great culture overlap. Teams working really well together, and teams that see the opportunity and see the way we approach customers in the markets that we're serving, like see those things really well aligned. And so super happy with Peter, the leadership team at Segment and all of the folks who joined Twilio by acquisition.

But talking about the opportunity ahead, look, I think we are seeing this come up in so many conversations with customers that maybe in the past before we had Segment as part of our portfolio wouldn't have organically come up. But now that Segment is here, really seeing that become a major part of the conversation. We're happy with customers because every company that I talk to seems to be struggling with, like, how do I build this one picture of my customer based on data that is spread across all these different -- not just systems they have, and they have that problem. They've got a separate system for marketing and a separate system for the contact center and a separate system for commerce but also across business units, like, oh, we did an acquisition here.

We got to integrate their view of the customer. And oh, we've got these different structures inside the company. And they all use different systems. And so this question of how do you actually build that profile of your customer? How do you understand your customer? The story that is being told by all the data that customers are giving off by how they use your website, how they use your mobile app, what things they bought, what things they've returned, et cetera, that story is resonating with customers because they all see that problem.

But then, not just how do you make sense of that data, how do you act on it? And that's where Twilio comes in. How do you actually build really engaging communications, whether it's marketing during your sales process, during your support or in-product, how do you tailor and make all that stuff dynamically personalized to every single customer to optimize their chances of becoming a repeat buyer, becoming a loyal customer of yours. And that's something you see so many companies wanting to do, struggling to do and looking to us to help them to do. And so when I look forward to what we're going to build with Segment, I see a tremendous surface area across pretty much every industry to help them solve this problem.

Brent Bracelin -- Piper Sandler -- Analyst

Interesting. Big problem but certainly a big opportunity. Khozema, one quick one for you. AT&T and T-Mobile joined the price increase party that I think Verizon kicked off last year.

How should we kind of think about the framework around what type of growth rate that could have an influence here on Q2? It looked like the guide did not include any sort of impact on that price increase. You have two carriers instead of one raising price. So just trying to think through how should we think about that impact in Q2. Or should we just kind of wait a quarter and wait until we see actually what happens? But just curious to hear your thoughts and guidance here on that price increase.

Khozema Shipchandler -- Chief Financial Officer -- Analyst

Yeah. I mean, we left it out of the guidance just so that it wouldn't be that confusing, and we wouldn't have to deal with all the kind of puts and takes. So you should look at the guide as being clean and excluding those impacts. I would say, you should largely expect them to be kind of in the ballpark as what we saw previously with Verizon.

But we'll provide a lot more detail on that when we do the Q2 call. And we'll give you the exact numbers at that time.

Brent Bracelin -- Piper Sandler -- Analyst

Got it. Makes sense. Thank you.

Khozema Shipchandler -- Chief Financial Officer -- Analyst

Yup.

Operator

Thank you. Your next question comes from the line of Alex Zukin from Wolfe. Your line is now open.

Alex Zukin -- Wolfe Research -- Analyst

Yeah. I'm going to -- instead of asking my typical dollar-based net expansion question because then I'll do just two very big-picture product questions. Jeff, maybe just for you first is if we take a step back and just now when we look at the components of your business, you're now getting into a point where you're able to do potentially intelligent messaging solutions where you can effectively have a customer send a message when a certain action takes place like a cart is left abandoned. And that -- the value-added component of that message for that customer is a lot higher than potentially some others.

So I guess, the question is, are you able to now start thinking about different pricing or different unit economics depending on the type of message that you're helping a customer deliver?

Jeff Lawson -- Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Alex. I think there's like two ways of thinking about that. One is our role as a platform. And as a platform, you support many different use cases.

And even within things like messaging, there's different use cases for messaging, and in fact, different messages may have different performance characteristics. Some customers might value speed of delivery although others might value things like bulk delivery. And so there's ways of thinking about how do you segment in the product itself at the platform layer. And then, there's ways of saying like, OK, but in order to actually do a specific use case, you often have software that's powering that use case or integrations.

To use the example you had, integration into shopping carts. And the business logic of that integration and the business logic of that intelligence is, in many ways, a different value proposition from the platform itself. And so as you see what we're doing with, for example, Flex, that's what we're building because we're building that -- the value proposition of a contact center on top of the perimeters. And you see that with our marketing campaigns product as well.

And so I think when you think about our core communications platform, you get the sense of the economics are tied to the underlying capabilities of the platform. And then, when you look at the engagement platform that sits above it, the economics are more closely tied to the value proposition that we're creating with the software. But I also think that part of Twilio's unique value proposition is to build a product and a go to market that really closely aligns how our customers use our products with what they pay. And I think that's a key competitive differentiation, which is a little different than traditional solution selling, which is you're trying to extract full value.

I think as a platform play, you still leave white space for customers to go paint in to make it theirs. And that's what they value. They want to build on top of their platform. And as a result of that, we give them that flexibility.

And that enables them to get outcomes that they can't get with any other vendor, that also enables developers to continue to be our biggest champions inside of these accounts. And I think those are important things for us to continue to consider.

Alex Zukin -- Wolfe Research -- Analyst

That makes perfect sense. And then, another, again, kind of big-picture question. If you think about the rise of IDFA, the demise of -- potential demise of third-party cookies, it's our thesis that we're entering the world where the notion of CDP for first-party data is going to rapidly accelerate in strategic performance. You guys mentioned -- I think, George, you mentioned that Segment is now in two-thirds or was in two-thirds of your customer conversations.

I guess, a couple of angles around this question. Is this something -- is this future world something you contemplated when making that acquisition? Are you just now reaping an even greater amount of strategic benefit? Just talk to us about how you think about segments in this new world, both integrated with the rest of your solutions as part of the platform but also on a stand-alone basis with respect to strategic [Inaudible] in front all these things.

Jeff Lawson -- Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer

This is Jeff. I'll answer unless, George, you want to.

George Hu -- Chief Operating Officer

Go ahead, Jeff. I'll chime in.

Jeff Lawson -- Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer

All right. Well, I'll get my point of view, and I'll let George give his point of view. Collaboration of who's going to answer is harder in this virtual world. My point of view is yes, we did think about the importance of first-party data and how every company is having to become great digital marketers and great digital executors.

And you can't necessarily rely on some of the, let's say, sloppier ways of acquiring and reengaging your customers when you've got a lot of third-party data floating around out there. So we did believe -- we do believe that the CDP market in and of itself as a stand-alone becomes ever more important to companies not just because of the plurality of systems you have to figure out how to make sense of but also because outside their walls, it's getting more complex to actually target and reach your own customers. So it becomes even more important that once you meet a customer, so there's your marketing or they buy something or whatever it is, that you do a really good job of continually engaging them because going back out to try to reacquire that customer is getting harder and harder and harder. And so companies have to treat their existing customers incredibly well, and those relationships are getting even more valuable.

And then, you add in all the value of -- and then, integrating that and creating that journey that's gonna achieve that using Twilio's customer engagement cloud that is the next level of benefit on top of the core CDP.

George Hu -- Chief Operating Officer

Yeah, I think Jeff said it really, really well. And I would say, we're having -- certainly, a lot of these conversations that I'm talking about are largely customers -- a lot of customers are learning about our acquisition, interested in our strategy and were having the broad conversation. But we're definitely seeing interest on both fronts of both the stand-alone CDP conversation as well as the potential for intelligent engagement that's built when you have the customer data and all the engagement channels together. So I think there is potential both stand-alone and integrated.

And I think that's one of the things that we're excited to continue to build on going forward.

Alex Zukin -- Wolfe Research -- Analyst

Congrats, and amazing execution going forward.

Jeff Lawson -- Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Your next question comes from the line of Derrick Wood from Cowen. Your line is now open.

Derrick Wood -- Cowen and Company -- Analyst

Hi, thanks for taking my questions, and congrats on a great quarter. We get a lot of questions from investors on how to think about consumption growth trends across various use cases as the economy opens up. So Jeff, it'd be great to hear what you're seeing from the COVID impact of use cases and travel, hospitality, ridesharing, and then get a sense of with the opening of the economy, how that impacts some of the use cases that got catalyzed from COVID. So really just trying to get an understanding of how those net out as we navigate through the opening of the economy and maybe put that in context with how you guys guided for Q2, which assumes flat to up $10 million in sequential revenue.

Jeff Lawson -- Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Absolutely, Derrick, I'll answer that. So the -- what I would say is like you got this usage pattern. And so you've got two categories like roll the clock back to a year ago. You had a category of digitization of lots of interactions.

That was really the path that society was on and every industry was on because of digital transformation like the big sector we're trading. And those got accelerated. And so a lot of the things that we're seeing like on the workflows between ordering online and picking up in the store and things like that, are getting far more use now than they would have before; or telemedicine, saw a huge acceleration of adoption of telemedicine. And those workflows have provided consumers, in a lot of cases, like a much more convenient path.

And these are things that these organizations, whether it was healthcare doing telemedicine or retailers doing really good online order pickup-type workflows, these are things that were on their path anyway, just got accelerated. And so I think we're seeing is a retraining like of consumers to expect new types of experiences. And those are gonna continue. And the competitive dynamics of keeping those features and making them better, make them ever easier, I think those are going to continue.

Then you've got the category of industries that were negatively impacted by COVID. So think travel, hospitality, things like that. And those, obviously, saw a decline in their usage in 2020. And now, I think we're starting to see the early signs of the recovery of those industries.

You probably read all the headlines talking about people returning to travel. They're getting vaccinated and how hard it is to get rental car and how airplanes are not full. And so as we see the return of those industries, I think that we will continue to see both a return of volume and usage but also of new use cases because many of those industries have to now go build trust with their consumers and say, hey, it's safe to do these things again. And hey, you trust us as the brand you're going to return to, as you start doing things like traveling or even out or whatever it is.

And so we're seeing not just the return of the old use cases, but I think also new engagement strategies that these companies have in order to build trust and loyalty in their customer bases that in many ways, they have to kind of reengage with and reacquire.

Derrick Wood -- Cowen and Company -- Analyst

And I guess, maybe I'd throw it to Khozema on the revenue guidance. Got some questions on -- just if you look at the sequentials, it's flat to slightly up. Historically, it's -- you've seen some good sequential seasonality in Q2. I know you may have conservatism in there.

But any other puts and takes to call out for Q2?

Khozema Shipchandler -- Chief Financial Officer -- Analyst

Yeah, I mean, let me just add to what Jeff said, and then I'll directly take your question. So I would say, in general, what our guidance contemplates is sort of a world without COVID, in a way. I mean, notwithstanding what Jeff said at the outset of the call, I mean, obviously, there is a lot going on globally. And I certainly don't want to take anything away from that and the impact that that's having on people.

But generally speaking, the way that we're looking at things is as if COVID is starting to wane, and we see durability in some of the positively impacted industries. We see recovery in some of the negatively impacted industries. And so in general, I think as we start to think about a world post-COVID, we just see a lot of general strength in the business, very kind of broadly diversified across industries and geos and company shapes and sizes. As it relates to Q2 specifically, I mean, we feel good about the guide.

I mean, obviously, we're still up in the quarter based on the guide, 47% to 50%. The world is a very, very complicated place right now. There's a lot of moving pieces. And so I think we'll wait and see how things exactly play out.

But we feel good about the way that we guided, the way that things are positioned. And we feel great about the long-term prospects of the business and certainly in the short and medium term.

Derrick Wood -- Cowen and Company -- Analyst

Right. Yes, 50% growth, pretty amazing. So congrats again. Thanks again.

Khozema Shipchandler -- Chief Financial Officer -- Analyst

Thanks, Derrick.

Operator

Thank you. Moving on, your next question comes from Ryan MacWilliams. Your line is now open.

Ryan MacWilliams -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Thank you. I'd ask the question about [Inaudible] normal dollar-based net expansion question. But knowing that this metric can fluctuate, especially with the SendGrid compare year over year, but anything to comment on here, why this gonna be low in the quarter? And maybe any read-throughs to the following quarters ahead? Thanks.

Khozema Shipchandler -- Chief Financial Officer -- Analyst

Yeah, you certainly hit one of the nails on the head. I mean, I would say, in general, like 133%, like DB&E is still really, really strong. So whether you look at it on a year-over-year basis or you look at it on a sequential basis, maybe I'll start with the latter. So on a sequential basis, you, obviously, don't have like the political dynamic, right, in a nonelection year.

And so that's going to drift it down a little bit. And then, we've also lapped Verizon carrier fees. And so one year away from that, that's going to have a little bit of an impact as well. And then, really, the third dynamic is what you said a moment ago in terms of SendGrid.

So I would say on kind of a normalized basis, you might think about 130s. But I mean, we feel great about the printed number, 133%. And we're really, really happy with the way that our expansion rate has been going.

Ryan MacWilliams -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Thanks. And just from my perspective, it was great to see how Twilio helped support global vaccine distribution. From a financial perspective, I was just been wondering, did vaccine distribution delivery materially impact results on the quarter?

Khozema Shipchandler -- Chief Financial Officer -- Analyst

I wouldn't say it impacted our financials materially. As I said a moment ago, like I think we're really looking at the world both in terms of our Q1 print as well as the way that we guided into Q2 based on a world in which COVID is sort of a thing that's starting to wane a little bit, and we just see broad-based things across the business. And any one use case is relatively di minimis.

Ryan MacWilliams -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Interesting. Thanks, guys.

Khozema Shipchandler -- Chief Financial Officer -- Analyst

Thanks.

Operator

Thank you. We have a follow-up question -- or your next question comes from Michael Turrin from Wells Fargo Securities. Your line is now open.

Michael Turrin -- Wells Fargo Securities -- Analyst

Hey, there. Thanks, everyone. Appreciate you taking the questions. George, the Deloitte hackathon you mentioned in the materials stood out as interesting.

I'm wondering if you can talk more about what events like that could maybe open up and how that can help with the push into targeted verticals. Specifically, healthcare seems interesting there, but anything you can add around context is helpful.

George Hu -- Chief Operating Officer

Yeah, thanks for the question. We've had a hackathon program now that we've used successfully in the enterprise area directly with customers, and now we're starting to do that with our partners. Obviously, when you're building momentum with a large system integrator, a lot of the -- a lot of what you needed to do is, first of all, get people internally just aware. There are -- these are not simple entities or complex entities.

They have lots of groups and just kind of evangelizing internally the power of Twilio, and the Twilio message is really important. So bringing these hackathons we find is, generally speaking, a really good way to extend our reach, especially among the developers and the thought leaders within an organization, whether it's a customer or an [Inaudible]. So we're excited about that. But also, the -- a lot of the times, these hackathons also yield really interesting IP or the beginnings of an interesting IP and whether that's at the customer side or on a partner side.

And with an entity like Deloitte, the opportunity to create vertical IP, I think, is very, very interesting, especially around Flex, which is a big focal point for a lot of our SI discussion. So it remains to be seen, obviously, how all these things play out. There's usually a pretty significant path between a hackathon and obviously, real IP. But we're excited about the opportunity, whether it's with Deloitte or with others, to go down this path, repeat that, continue to evangelize, get the flywheel going and continuously do more work with them.

I mean, we're really excited about the potential of this partnership. We're seeing some traction already, and this is just another kind of another brick on the path to -- on the pathway to building a really successful long-term enterprise playbook.

Michael Turrin -- Wells Fargo Securities -- Analyst

Yeah, makes a lot of sense. Just quick for Khozema. Can we go back to ValueFirst for just a moment? I'd just be curious if there's more you can add on what that adds internationally. I know that's been one of a few focus areas.

And then anything you can add on any contribution? I don't know what the timing specifically looks like, but any contribution you saw or would expect to see is helpful.

Khozema Shipchandler -- Chief Financial Officer -- Analyst

Yeah, just to take the latter part of the question first. Very de minimis contribution in the current quarter, and it'll be relatively de minimis contribution going forward as well. So we're not necessarily calling it out. I mean, I would say, ValueFirst kind of fits into one of the questions that was asked earlier in terms of just broader trends that we're seeing in supply chain.

I mean, when we see a unique asset that we think, on the one hand, gives us a particularly interesting entry into a geo, and it's not limited to India, obviously, although India is, obviously, a huge consumer market, but I'd throw Mexico into the same category, which is why we did a deal there, too. But India, Mexico, large consumer markets, opportunity for some cost capabilities. And then, with these acquisitions, we always get awesome, awesome local teams. And so it's really just a combination of those things.

But from a financial perspective, I think this is like an add to the portfolio but nothing that you should really think about in terms of having an outsized impact on our financials at all.

Michael Turrin -- Wells Fargo Securities -- Analyst

Helpful. Keep up the pace. Thanks. Thanks, everyone.

Khozema Shipchandler -- Chief Financial Officer -- Analyst

Thanks.

Operator

Thank you. Your next question is from Mark Murphy from J.P. Morgan. Your line is open.

Pinjalim Bora -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

Oh, hey, this is Pinjalim on behalf of Mark. Congrats on the quarter, guys. Jeff, a high-level question again for you. So on a product strategy point of view, how do you think about kind of accelerating the usage of Twilio core communications by developers, just the usage of that? Do you think like serverless or functions is an important strategy to drive speed to market for developers or maybe the Studio's way to go to democratize the usage beyond developers? Or now that you have Segment, maybe you can actually tap into a broader and good customer engagement solution? Would love to hear your thoughts around that.

Jeff Lawson -- Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Absolutely. So first of all, I'd say we're really pleased with the adoption of Twilio and all of our products by developers, and I think that's going very well. Developers continue to pull us into the wide variety of opportunities at every kind of company that you see us posting up as new customers. As far as smoothing out, I don't necessarily draw a straight line between like low-code/no-code and like getting more developers or more accounts on the platform.

I think low-code/no-code are tools. And when the problem we have fits well into -- [Technical difficulty]

George Hu -- Chief Operating Officer

Hey, guys, it seems like -- this is George. Seems like there might be a problem with Jeff's line. So obviously, I can't completely anticipate his train of thought there. But certainly --

Jeff Lawson -- Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Can you hear me? Can you hear me now?

George Hu -- Chief Operating Officer

Oh, you're back. Perfect. Thanks.

Jeff Lawson -- Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. Zilli says my phone connected to my car, and that is exactly what happened because someone just thought to go pick up my kids and turn on the car. So fantastic. Good to know that that's a way earnings calls can fail.

So back to what I was saying. I don't know where I lost you. But essentially, low-code/no-code is a tool that if that tool allows you to build your use case faster, more reliably because it's hosted for you and an active provision on infrastructure, then developers love to use it as do [Inaudible] called system developers. But it's the right tool for the right job.

And we've seen a lot of uptake in Studio for certain types of workflows and other things that are more client side and more deeply embedded, may not be the right tool, but we are definitely committed to this road map of using low-code/no-code and what I call yellow code, each from the right thing that enables the developers and the various participants of the company to do the task that they need to do. And by the way, that includes taking things like Flex, which really accelerate our customers' time to deploy these solutions, but then still give them the flexibility to go invoke functions or use Studio to build that IVR or build that chatbot flow and plug it into this the right spot. And so I would say, I think we're using low-code/no-code effectively today. And we've got a matching road map for how we can continue to unlock more and more use cases and more and more customers to be using that.

But we are very happy with the adoption that the developers are already doing on Twilio across those solutions, including a lot of them who aren't using no-code because they're writing code the old way.

Pinjalim Bora -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

Understood. Thank you.

Andrew Zilli -- Vice President of Investor Relations and Treasury

Great. And that will do it for today's call. So really appreciate everybody joining today, and look forward to catching up with you throughout the rest of the quarter.

Operator

[Operator signoff]

Duration: 35 minutes

Call participants:

Andrew Zilli -- Vice President of Investor Relations and Treasury

Jeff Lawson -- Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer

Meta Marshall -- Morgan Stanley -- Analyst

George Hu -- Chief Operating Officer

Samad Samana -- Jefferies -- Analyst

Fred Havemeyer -- Macquarie Group -- Analyst

Khozema Shipchandler -- Chief Financial Officer -- Analyst

Brent Bracelin -- Piper Sandler -- Analyst

Alex Zukin -- Wolfe Research -- Analyst

Derrick Wood -- Cowen and Company -- Analyst

Ryan MacWilliams -- Stephens Inc. -- Analyst

Michael Turrin -- Wells Fargo Securities -- Analyst

Pinjalim Bora -- J.P. Morgan -- Analyst

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